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Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

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NPR Story
3:40 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

Should You Tell Your Partner About Past Loves?

(Grant/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 4:43 pm

Vermont couple Leon Marasco and Kate Harper were friends for 17 years before they became romantically involved.

Because of that friendship, they knew all about each other’s former partners and felt that that knowledge deepened the bond between them.

Harper and Marasco wondered if other couples had had similar experiences.

After doing interviews and collecting hundreds of stories, they found the answer seems to be yes.

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NPR Story
3:40 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

'Hump Day' Disrupts Class

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 4:43 pm

The Geico commercial “Hump Day,” has gone viral.

Students at Vernon Center Middle School in Connecticut made news when they used the phrase “hump day” so much it became disruptive.

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NPR Story
3:39 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

Government Shutdown Threatens Mortgages, Housing Recovery

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 4:43 pm

Borrowers hoping to get mortgages backed by a government agency will probably see delays, as much of the staff is furloughed due to the government shutdown.

The shutdown comes as the housing market has climbed back from the financial crisis. If the shutdown lasts more than a week, economists predict it will threaten the housing and economic recovery.

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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

FBI Seeks Answers Following DC Car Rampage

Authorities say Miriam Carey, 34, of Stamford, Conn. was shot and killed by police after a high-speed chase. (Advanced Periodontics)

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 4:43 pm

FBI agents in Stamford, Conn., are searching for clues about why an unarmed 34-year-old mother who lived there went on a driving rampage in Washington, D.C. yesterday.

The incident resulted in her shooting death by Capitol police.

Miriam Carey was traveling with her 1-year-old daughter when she tried to breach a barrier at the White House, and then veered her car down Constitution Avenue, driving up to 80-miles-per-hour, toward the Capitol buildings. She eventually crashed into a barrier.

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NPR Story
3:19 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Negotiation Expert Weighs In On Washington Stalemate

With the negotiations between Democrats and Republicans stalled in Washington, D.C., Here & Now turns to a negotiation expert.

We ask, what would get both parties to agree?

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NPR Story
3:19 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

September Jobs Report Expected To Be Delayed

Every month, investors turn to the jobs report to assess the state of the U.S. job market.

But due to the partial government shutdown that began on Tuesday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics is not expected to meet its Friday deadline for the September jobs report.

NPR business reporter Jim Zarroli joins us to talk about what that could mean for investors.

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NPR Story
3:19 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Andre Dubus III's Tales Of 'Dirty Love'

The latest book by Andre Dubus III is "Dirty Love." (Kevin Harkins)

Note: This segment contains content that may not be appropriate for younger listeners.

Andre Dubus III is the author of the critically-acclaimed novel “House of Sand And Fog” and memoir “Townie.”

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NPR Story
6:23 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Marc Jacobs Leaves Louis Vuitton

Fashion designer Marc Jacobs, at the end of his Louis Vuitton ready to wear Spring-Summer 2013 collection, presented in Paris, Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012. (Jacques Brinon/AP)

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 3:19 pm

After months of speculation American fashion designer Marc Jacobs has announced that he is leaving Louis Vuitton.

After 16 years as the creative director for the the French fashion house best known for their LV monogrammed canvas bags, Jacobs is turning his attention to preparing the Marc Jacobs brand for an eventual public offering.

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NPR Story
6:23 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Marine Veteran Struggles To Start His Own Business

Logo for Intrepid Life Coffee and Spirits in Durham, NC. (http://intrepidlifecoffeeandspirits.com/)

Matt Victoriano served two tours of duty as a Marine sniper team leader in Iraq.

Since he came home in 2004, he has battled post-traumatic stress disorder.

He has also struggled to find meaningful work.

We met Victoriano a year ago, when we were covering the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte.

He told us about his business plan to open a microbrewery. This brewery would also serve as an incubator for fellow veterans, to help them open their own businesses.

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NPR Story
6:22 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Writer Tom Clancy Dies At 66

Tom Clancy pictured at Boston College in 1989. (Wikimedia)

Best selling author Tom Clancy died today; he was 66.

His top-selling novels helped forge a new genre of military fiction that gave readers detailed knowledge of the Pentagon and the Soviet war machine.

Best-sellers included “A Clear and Present Danger,” “Patriot Games” and “The Hunt For Red October,” which inspired the 1990 film of the same name.

Joseph Finder writes thrillers, and joins Here & Now to discuss Clancy’s legacy.

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NPR Story
3:35 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

'Eat, Pray, Love' Author Dives Into 19th Century Science

"Eat, Pray, Love" author Elizabeth Gilbert's latest book is "The Signature of All Things: A Novel."

Elizabeth Gilbert is known for her memoirs “Eat, Pray, Love” and “Committed.” But she dives into the world of late 18th and 19th century science to write her first novel in 13 years, “The Signature of All Things.”

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NPR Story
3:35 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Farm Equipment Makers Worry Over Commodity Prices

(Bill Wheelhouse/Harvest Public Media)

While the country’s economy was slumping over the last five years, the American farm economy was booming.

Companies that manufacture tractors and other farm implements have done exceptionally well, as many farmers have been replacing their pricey equipment every year.

But with commodity prices dropping and a major tax break in jeopardy in Congress, there are fears that business will start to stall.

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NPR Story
3:35 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

ADM To Move Its Headquarters Out Of Decatur

Archer Daniels Midlands' headquarters in Decatur, Illinois. (Archer Daniels Midland)

The city of Decatur, Illinois, will no longer be home to the headquarters of global food giant Archer Daniels Midland. ADM is moving its headquarters to a new, as yet unannounced, location.

About 4,400 ADM employees will continue to work in Decatur, some in a new ADM logistics facility.

But the departure of the ADM headquarters leaves Decatur — informally known as the soybean capital of the world — in an even more precarious position economically.

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NPR Story
3:28 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Fans Mourn As 'Breaking Bad' Comes To A Close

A scene from the last episode of Breaking Bad. (Ursula Coyote/AMC)

AMC’s critically-acclaimed series, Breaking Bad came to an end last night.

Joanna Robinson, editor for the media website Pajiba, joined Here & Now to talk about the show and its ending, which she called “somewhat satisfying.”

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NPR Story
3:26 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Obamacare 101: More Questions Answered

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 3:28 pm

Key parts of the Affordable Care Act go into effect tomorrow, with heath insurance exchanges opening for enrollment.

Jay Hancock of Kaiser Health News returns to Here & Now to answer more of your questions.

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NPR Story
3:26 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Airlines Offer New Services — For A Fee

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 3:28 pm

Airlines are introducing a new bevy of fees, but this time passengers might actually like them.

Unlike the first generation of charges which dinged fliers for once-free services like checking a bag, these new fees promise a taste of the good life, or at least a more civil flight.

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NPR Story
3:26 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Esteemed Art Collection Appraised For Bankrupt Detroit

Michigan Radio tackles three rumors about what could happen to the Detroit Institute of Arts. (Flickr)

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 3:28 pm

Detroit is leaving no stone unturned as it works to climb out of bankruptcy. And that includes considering selling some of the city’s esteemed art collection.

The city’s emergency manager has hired the auction house Christie’s to appraise some 3,500 pieces at the Detroit Institute of Art.

But what will the city do once the art is priced?

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NPR Story
4:20 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Exhibit Illuminates Three Generations Of Wyeths

Jamie Wyeth, The Headlands of Monhegan Island, Maine, 2007, Oil on canvas, 40 x 60 inches. Wyeth Collection, ©Jamie Wyeth
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NPR Story
4:20 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

The Economic Impact Of A Government Shutdown

We’ve been hearing this week about the federal budget crisis in Washington. So far, the focus has been on members of Congress and their political battles.

But if Congress can’t agree on a way to fund government when the new fiscal year begins on Tuesday, then the spotlight could shift over to the economic bystanders.

Those are the innocent workers and business owners who stand to lose from any disruption in government.

NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax joins us to talk about the potential economic impact of a government shutdown.

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NPR Story
4:20 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Senate OKs Budget Bill, But Fight Not Over

Update 2:08 p.m.: The Democratic-run Senate has approved legislation aimed at preventing a Tuesday federal shutdown.

Friday’s vote was 54-44.

But it remains unclear whether the Senate and the Republican-run House will be able to complete a compromise bill in time to get it to President Barack Obama for his signature before the government has to close.

That is because House GOP leaders are still struggling to figure out how they can win enough votes from conservatives to push a new version of the legislation through their chamber.

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NPR Story
3:46 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Panera CEO Takes The Food Stamps Challenge

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 5:03 pm

Ron Shaich, the CEO and founder of Panera Bread lived on a food and beverage budget of $4.50 per day for a week.

That figure is about the same amount someone receiving food assistance would get per day.

He joins Here & Now to share what he’s learned from the experience.

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NPR Story
3:46 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

A Look At Parkinson's As Michael J. Fox Returns To TV

Michael J. Fox returns to television tonight with the debut of "The Michael J. Fox Show." (NBC)

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 5:03 pm

It’s been 22 years since Michael J. Fox was first diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease — and 15 years since he famously told Barbara Walters that he would be cured of Parkinson’s before his 50th birthday.

That didn’t happen, but neither did his doctor’s stated expectation that he would have only about 10 more years to work in television.

Fox makes his return to television tonight — no longer trying hide his Parkinson’s symptoms, as he did during his six years on “Spin City.”

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NPR Story
3:45 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Popular Science Disables Online Comments

(ccarlstead/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 5:03 pm

The magazine Popular Science is turning off its user comments, citing a study from the University of Wisconsin that shows readers exposed to rude or insulting comments reported a skewed view of the information they read in the article.

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NPR Story
3:34 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Author Karen Russell Awarded MacArthur 'Genius Grant'

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 4:39 pm

Karen Russell’s debut novel “Swamplandia!” got critical raves, as did her follow-up short story collection “Vampires in the Lemon Grove.”

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NPR Story
3:34 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Kenyans Mourn, Come To Grips With Mall Attack

Zachary Yach and four others in the popular ArtCaffe survived the attack. (BBC)

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 4:41 pm

Kenya has begun three days of national mourning today, after the siege of a Nairobi shopping mall ended on Tuesday.

Now, the stories of what happened inside the mall are emerging, and people affected by the siege are still coming to terms with what’s happened.

The BBC’s Will Ross is in Nairobi and has been meeting those who were there, and the people trying to help them.

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NPR Story
3:34 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Upswing In China's Economy May Be Temporary

In this May 30, 2013: Volvo car at an assembly line of a Volvo factory in Chengdu, southwestern China's Sichuan province released by Volvo Cars. (AP Photo/Volvo Cars)

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 3:46 pm

Manufacturing in China is at a six-month high, but many economists think this growth could be driven by government policy rather than by real demand.

“Modest growth is what you’re seeing,” NPR’s Shanghai correspondent Frank Langfitt told Here & Now.

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NPR Story
3:42 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Remembering Nirvana's Final Album 'In Utero'

Cover art for "In Utero," Nirvana's third and final album. The album is being reissued to mark its 20th anniversary. (Nirvana)

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 3:46 pm

To commemorate the 20th anniversary of Nirvana’s third and final record, “In Utero,” Here & Now speaks with pop culture critic Renee Graham, and Here & Now producer and director Alex Ashlock shares these thoughts:

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NPR Story
3:42 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Ted Cruz Embraces 'Wacko Bird' Label

Freshman U.S. Senator Ted Cruz of Texas began an old-fashioned talking filibuster this afternoon, to try to get the rest of the Senate to go along with his plan to defund Obamacare.

He will probably not be at a loss for words.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

After 21-Year Dry Streak, Pirates Make The Playoffs

Pittsburgh Pirates center fielder Andrew McCutchen, left, Starling Marte, center and Marlon Byrd celebrate the Pirates' 2-1 win over the Chicago Cubs after a baseball game Monday, Sept. 23, 2013, in Chicago. (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 3:46 pm

The Pittsburgh Pirates finally snapped out of their 21-year losing streak and have clinched a spot in the playoffs.

In their game against the Chicago Cubs on Monday, the Pirates won 2-1, allowing them to advance to the playoffs, something the team hasn’t done since 1992.

Lanny Frattare experienced that day all those years ago. Frattare was the play-by-play announcer for the Pirates for 33 years.

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NPR Story
3:53 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Elections In Germany May Shift Economic Tone In Eurozone

German chancellor Angela Merkel smiles behind German flags at the party headquarters in Berlin, Sunday, Sept. 22, 2013. (Michael Sohn/AP)

Chancellor Angela Merkel has won her third term as Germany’s top leader.

But Merkel’s center-right Christian Democrats party fell five seats short of an absolute majority in the German Bundestag — the national parliament.

This may change some economic policies in the eurozone’s largest economy, including a softening towards bailed-out nations like Greece.

Financial Times reporter Cardiff Garcia joins Here & Now to explain.

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