Here and Now on IPR News and News/Studio One

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Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

When the Trump administration threatened to take away federal money from “sanctuary cities” earlier this year, many of those jurisdictions doubled down, saying they had no intention of becoming an arm of the federal government by turning people over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has emerged as a fierce critic of President Trump. He’s blasted the president over immigration, health care and climate change. In doing so, Inslee has developed something of a national profile, and soon he’ll likely attract even more attention.

Although Islam is the fastest-growing religion in the world, not all people born Muslim remain Muslim. But for many, it’s not easy to leave a religion that is a major part of their lives and communities.

Author Ben H. Winters‘ best-selling 2016 novel “Underground Airlines” is set in present day, but in an America where Abraham Lincoln never took office and slavery is legal in four states.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti revisits a conversation with Winters from last July about the novel, which is out in paperback on July 18, and the difficulties that he had as a white author dealing with such a racially charged topic.

Lessons Learned From Ancient Toilets

Jul 13, 2017

Though it may sound distasteful, the ruins of toilets and sewer systems can be a treasure trove for researchers who want to know how early Romans lived and ate.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti spoke with Brandeis classics professor Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow about her work in archaic sanitation last summer, and today we revisit that conversation.

What's At Stake As Trump Visits France?

Jul 13, 2017

NPR’s Domenico Montanaro (@DomenicoNPR) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss the politics around President Trump’s visit to France today.

Two former directors of Medicaid — one who served under a Democrat, the other under a Republican — are asking Congress not to change Medicaid right now.

The avant-garde classical composer Molly Herron doesn't make easy music. It's work that asks the listener to engage, and open up to new ways of hearing sound. At Dartmouth College recently, Herron unveiled a new piece played entirely on homemade instruments.

Todd Bookman (@toddbookman) from Here & Now contributor New Hampshire Public Radio reports.

Godsmack frontman, singer-songwriter Sully Erna, is known for his hard rock sound. Now, he’s out with a different kind of album.

“Hometown Life” is a mix of country, rock and blues, and the song “Different Kind of Tears” is part of an awareness campaign to fight opioid addiction. The song and accompanying video were created in partnership with the Recovery Centers of America and the Mark Wahlberg Youth Foundation.

In Gayle Forman‘s novel “Leave Me,” a heart attack prompts an overcommitted mother of twins to leave her family and start a new life.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young revisits a conversation about the book with Forman (@gayleforman) from last September.

Forty years ago, President Jimmy Carter awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The civil rights icon was assassinated about a decade earlier.

Sean Powers (@SeanPowersGPB) of Georgia Public Broadcasting revisits that day at the White House with an audio postcard.

From a stock market milestone to a low unemployment rate, there have been a number of important economic indicators to follow in the first half of 2017.

During National Lake Appreciation Month, we asked for your favorite lakes and you responded. Check out the second part in our summer series on lakes.


This summer, we’re going to spend some time cooling off with lakes. If you have some time to get away this summer, even if it’s only for the day, where should you go?

A Pakistani family is one of the last group of refugees to be resettled in the U.S., ahead of new federal guidelines restricting refugee arrivals, expected to go into effect next week.

Carmel Delshad (@cdelshad) of Here & Now contributor WAMU was at Dulles Airport in Virginia, when they arrived and has this report.

Tens of thousands have taken to the streets of Hamburg, Germany, to protest the G-20 Summit there. Meanwhile, President Trump sat down for his first face-to-face meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, as concerns about Russia’s interference in the 2016 election mount at home.

Mosquito biologist Andy Lima sometimes goes by another name. As MC Bugg-Z, he raps about mosquitoes and the illnesses they can spread. It is all part of a campaign to educate the public on disease prevention.

Jacob Fenston (@JacobFenston) of Here & Now contributor WAMU reports on the scientist/rapper who figured out that “Zika” rhymes with “mosquita.”

Francis Scott Key is most famous for writing “The Star-Spangled Banner” after the Battle of Baltimore during the War of 1812. But after he penned the now-famous lyrics, he hardly mentioned them during his life.

Circus sideshow displays of “freaks” were very popular in the United States up until the 20th century. In 1899, George and Willie Muse, the African-American children of sharecroppers, were lured from their home to become part of one such sideshow.

The Wimbledon Tennis Championships gets underway Monday. This year marks the 90th anniversary of the first radio commentary of the historic competition, which was broadcast by the BBC.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Robert Seatter, head of BBC History, about the championship and its impact on sports broadcasting over the years.

In the 1960s, the American bald eagle was nearly extinct due to the pesticide DDT and habitat destruction. DDT was banned in 1972, and the eagle population eventually came back. But now, there’s another threat to the American bald eagle: lead ammunition.

Angelica Morrison (@amorrisonWBFO) of Here & Now contributor Great Lakes Today reports.

MSNBC hosts Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough on Friday wrote a Washington Post opinion piece in response to President Trump’s tweets Thursday, saying that Brzezinski was “bleeding badly from a face-lift” when she recently visited his Florida resort Mar-a-Lago.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo declared a state of emergency Thursday for the New York City subway system, which is in serious need of repairs. The announcement comes days after a train derailment in Manhattan that injured dozens.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Michael Regan (@Reganonymous), senior editor for Bloomberg News, about the improvements needed.

The Anchorage Petroleum Wives Club has been around longer than Alaska has been a state. The club was founded in 1957 after the first big oil discovery in Alaska.

The United Nations declared 2017 the International Year of Sustainable Tourism — just in time for the Adventure Junky travel app. Part environmental guide, part social planner, the app offers sustainability-minded adventurers the tools to find off-the-beaten-path travel experiences, or to revel in those experienced by others.

During a White House press briefing Tuesday, Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders used a familiar tactic when she criticized the news media for producing a “constant barrage of fake news.” The criticism prompted Brian Karem, executive editor of the Montgomery County Sentinel, to interrupt Huckabee Sanders and accuse her of continually trying to undermine the media.

When hair falls on the floor during a haircut, it’s typically swept up and thrown into the trash. But a couple of salons in Nashville are seeking a more useful afterlife for hair clippings.

Amy Eskind of Here & Now contributor Nashville Public Radio reports on the unlikely recycling effort.

Living With Zika: One Mother's Story

Jun 27, 2017

Summer is here and with the heat comes the threat of mosquitoes and the diseases they can spread, like the Zika virus. There are currently 80 infants in the mainland U.S. with birth defects caused by Zika, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The U.S. health system is at the very beginning of learning how to care for those babies.

It’s an intriguing tale of secrets, class and motherhood. “Leaving Lucy Pear” tells the story of a baby who is abandoned under a pear tree in Gloucester, Massachusetts, by her Jewish 18-year-old mother. Bea hopes that an Irish family who steals the fruit in the dark of night will take the infant and raise her as their own.

A Pentagon memo obtained by The Washington Post suggests that some foreign-born U.S. military recruits, who are not yet citizens, could face deportation. The memo describes “potential security threats” of the immigrants who were recruited under a program that fast-tracks citizenship.

'Pharma Bro' Martin Shkreli's Trial Begins

Jun 26, 2017

Former pharmaceutical CEO Martin Shkreli goes on trial starting Monday for federal securities fraud. Shkreli, who became known as “pharma bro,” came under widespread criticism for upping the price of the lifesaving drug Daraprim 5,000 percent. He is going on trial for something unrelated — prosecutors say that he operated a Ponzi-like scheme at two companies he ran.

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