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Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

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NPR Story
2:44 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

'Whitey' Bulger Guilty Of 11 Killings

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:29 pm

James “Whitey” Bulger, the feared Boston mob boss who became one of the nation’s most-wanted fugitives, was convicted Monday in a string of 11 killings and other gangland crimes, many of them committed while he was said to be an FBI informant. (Read the full verdict here)

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NPR Story
2:44 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Will E-Books Be Passed Down Through Generations?

(mcbridejc/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:29 pm

After his aunt Eunice recently died, columnist Danny Heitman inherited many of her books — from Plutarch to coffee table books of her favorite artist, Andrew Wyeth.

But with the proliferation of e-books, Heitman wonders whether books will be passed on from one generation to the next.

In a recent column called “Can you inherit an e-book?,” Heitman writes:

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NPR Story
2:44 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Sarah Siskind's Music, Rediscovered

Sarah Siskind has re-released her album, "Covered," under the record label of Justin Vernon, better known as Bon Iver. (Facebook)

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:29 pm

NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson brings us new music each week to listen to.

This week, we’re reaching back into the archive, sort of.

In 2003, Sarah Siskind released an album called “Covered.” But as a result of severe sinus problems that required surgery, Siskind wasn’t able to tour and the album never really got off the ground.

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NPR Story
2:10 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Expert Says To Get Russia, Read The Great Russian Authors

Saint Basil's Cathedral in Moscow. (Kwong Yee Cheng/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 4:11 pm

With U.S.-Russia relations at a new low, we revisit our conversation with Tom de Waal, who says that when it comes to understanding Russia and Vladimir Putin, stop listening to the political scientists.

Instead, de Waal says reading Nikolai Gogol, Anton Chekhov and Fyodor Dostoyevsky will help you understand not just Russia, but key neighboring states like Ukraine and Georgia.

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NPR Story
2:09 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

U.S. Military Revives Blimp Technology

(Courtesy of U.S. Army)

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 4:11 pm

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NPR Story
2:09 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Priceline's Stock Climbs, Despite Europe Crisis

Actor William Shatner, the "Priceline negotiator," is the face of Priceline. (Priceline)

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 4:11 pm

Priceline.com, the U.S. online travel agency, has seen its stocks rise to near $1,000 — a record it set during the dot-com bubble of the 1990s.

Priceline purchased the Amsterdam-based Booking.com in 2005, and has relied on European hotel reservations for its growth.

This comes despite the tanking economies of some of the biggest European tourist destinations: Portugal, Greece, Ireland and Spain.

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NPR Story
2:47 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Veteran Documents His Unit In Tintype Photographs

"Lieutenant/Co-pilot," a tintype made by Ed Drew in Afghanistan. (Ed Drew, Courtesy of the Robert Koch Gallery)

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 7:29 am

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NPR Story
2:47 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Debate Over End Of Ramadan Complicates Doing Business

Today marks the end of Ramadan — or does it?

For 30 days, more than 1.5 billion Muslims fast during daylight hours, commemorating the month in which Allah is said to have revealed the first verses of the Koran.

But now, a theological debate surrounding the end of the holiday is making diplomacy and business in the Muslim world a bit more complicated.

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NPR Story
2:47 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

A Family's Painful Wait For Verdict In Bulger Trial

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 5:39 pm

The jury in the Boston trial of reputed mobster James “Whitey” Bulger is deliberating for the third day in his murder and racketeering trial.

For the families of his 19 alleged murder victims, the wait for the verdict to come down is just part of a long, painful journey.

From the the Here & Now Contributors Network, David Boeri of WBUR reports.

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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

The Summer Of Ethan Hawke

Ethan Hawke at the premiere of the film "Before Midnight," at the 63rd annual Berlin Film Festival in February 2013 (Siebbi/commons.wikimedia.org)

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 3:39 pm

It’s been a great summer for actor Ethan Hawke.

Before Midnight,” the third installment in the series of films he made with actress Julie Delpy and filmmaker Richard Linklater, opened to wide critical acclaim, giving him undeniable indie credentials. (See trailers for all three films below.)

He also had had a number one hit at the box office with the horror film “The Purge.”

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Bird Flu Researchers Push To Make Virus More Contagious

Flu vaccine production - Before incubation, the eggs are inoculated with the seed virus Val de Reuil - France - March 2009. (Sanofi Pasteur/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:05 pm

In a letter published today in the nation’s two most prestigious scientific journals — Science and Nature — bird flu researchers say they need to perform research on the H7N9 virus that would make it more dangerous.

The researchers say that’s necessary in order to prepare for its possible spread between humans, perhaps as early as this winter.

The paper comes on the heels of a new study in the British Medical Journal that shows the first probable transmission between humans of the H7N9 virus.

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Bird Flu Strain May Be Transmissible Between Humans

Health workers take a blood sample from a chicken in Hong Kong Thursday, April 11, 2013. The Hong Kong government started enhanced measures to prevent a new strain of bird flu from entering the city. Starting from Thursday, the authority is taking samples of live poultry from mainland China to test for the H7N9 virus. Thirty samples are taken in every 1,000 chickens. (Vincent Yu/AP)

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:05 pm

new study in the British Medical Journal shows the first probable transmission between humans of a new strain of avian flu — the H7N9 virus.

A 32-year-old woman in China became sick and died after caring for her father who had the H7N9 virus. The father also died.

However, the authors of the study stress this does not mean the virus has evolved to be easily transmissible between humans.

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Bezos Could Give Washington Post The Gift Of Time

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:05 pm

Earlier this week, online shopping pioneer Jeff Bezos said he would buy The Washington Post.

Given the sorry state of newspaper finances, some saw his move as an act of civic charity.

Others believe Bezos is a shrewd businessman who hopes to make the Post very profitable again. Maybe both views are right.

Marilyn Geewax, a senior business editor with NPR, joins us to discuss how the new philanthropy may involve giving the gift of time — time to figure out a new business model that works.

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Japan Tries To Stop Radioactive Water Leaks

A construction worker walks beside the underground water tank and water tanks at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant at Okuma in Fukushima prefecture, Japan, June 12, 2013. (Toshifumi Kitamura/AP)

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:05 pm

The Japanese government announced today that the leaks of radioactive cooling water from the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant are worse than it thought.

Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has ordered the government to step in to help TEPCO, the Tokyo Electric Power Company, come up with a solution.

TEPCO only recently acknowledged that the groundwater, used to cool the three reactors damaged in the tsunami of 2011, has been seeping into the ocean.

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Pot Liquor: A Southern Tradition To Salvage Nutritious Broth From Greens

"Pot likker and cornbread" at Mary Mac's Tea Room in Atlanta, Georgia. (wallyg/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 1:55 pm

Pot liquor — not what the name implies — is the leftover water of boiled greens.

It’s a Louisiana tradition to save the nutrient and vitamin-rich water that leaches out during cooking.

NPR food and health correspondent Allison Aubrey tastes some of the greens water and shares tips on how to use it.

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

In An Autocorrect Generation, Does Spelling Still Matter?

Thomas Hurley is pictured in a screen shot from his appearance on Jeopardy. (YouTube)

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 6:57 am

Connecticut eighth-grader Thomas Hurley has serious beef with Alex Trebek.

The “Kids Jeopardy” contestant made it all the way to the Final Jeopardy round and even got the right answer. The only problem? He spelled it wrong.

We’ve decided in current society that spelling is important — that there’s only one single correct way to spell every word.
–Simon Horobin

Hurley told his local newspaper that he was “cheated” out of the question and that “it was just a spelling error.”

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

LA Commuters Brace Themselves For 'Obama Jam'

President Barack Obama smiles towards the audience during his appearance for taping of NBC’s The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Oct. 24, 2012, in Burbank, Calif. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)

President Obama is in California today for a short visit that includes an appearance on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.”

His visits cause a bit of panic, with drivers concerned about major traffic headaches, but some say it’s much ado about nothing.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Denver School Gets Blind Students Into Chemistry

Quinita Thomas (left), who is blind, works with her partner in a Metro State University chemistry lab. (CPR)

Mixing chemicals in a high school lab is challenging enough. Imagine doing it if you were blind.

A group of visually impaired students from all over the country had that chance at Metro State University in Denver recently.

It’s part of an effort to get more blind people interested in science, technology and math — fields in which they are severely underrepresented in the workforce.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Jenny Brundin of Colorado Public Radio has more.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

New IVF Technique Raises Ethical Questions

Connor Levy is the first baby born using a new in vitro fertilization technique. (Courtesy of Main Line Fertility)

A Philadelphia baby, born in May, is the first child in the world conceived using a new in vitro fertilization (IVF) technique, which screens embryos for chromosomal disorders and abnormalities before implantation.

People who use this technique will avoid implanting chromosomally abnormal embryos that would result in either not becoming pregnant, or in miscarriage.

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NPR Story
2:32 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

State Department Urges U.S. Citizens To Leave Yemen

Police stop cars at a checkpoint near the U.S. embassy in Sanaa, Yemen. The State Department today ordered non-essential personnel at the U.S. Embassy in Yemen to leave the country. (Hani Mohammed/AP)

The State Department is urging all U.S. citizens to leave Yemen today citing “continued potential for terrorist attacks” and an “extremely high” security threat level.

The department has ordered its non-essential personnel at the U.S. Embassy in Yemen to leave the country.

This follows days of embassy lockdowns across the Middle East and Africa.

This morning, the U.S. Air Force transported State Department personnel out of Yemen’s capital, leaving only the most essential employees on the ground to monitor the security situation there.

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NPR Story
2:01 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion Make Music Onstage And Off

Johnny Irion and Sarah Lee Guthrie. (Joanna Chattman)

Sarah Lee Guthrie grew up in a musical household — she’s the daughter of Arlo Guthrie and the granddaughter of Woody.

But as she tells Here & Now, growing up, music was something she avoided. With musicians coming in and out and staying for weeks, “I always felt like we were the Addams family, we were so weird!”

Then she met musician Johnny Irion. The two fell in love and began playing together, as well as well as marrying and having a family.

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NPR Story
2:01 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

One Scientist's Quest: Improving The Flavor Of Commercial Tomatoes

Professor Harry Klee. (Tyler Jones/University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences)

Grocery store tomatoes are bred for yield and firmness, not for flavor.

And even though taste is relative, researchers at the University of Florida, Gainesville, believe they can come up with varieties of delicious tomatoes that will also appeal to commercial growers.

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NPR Story
2:01 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

George W. Bush Undergoes Heart Procedure

Former President George W. Bush is pictured July 10, 2013. (LM Otero/AP)

Former President George W. Bush underwent a successful heart procedure earlier today at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, to clear an blockage discovered yesterday during a routine physical.

The former president had a stent was inserted.

Cardiologist James Willerson, who is president and medical director of the Texas Heart Institute in Houston, joins us to explain the procedure, the symptoms of a blocked artery and what could have happened if doctors hadn’t discovered it.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Sounds Of Africa In St. Louis

Fred Onovwerosuoke founded the St. Louis African Chorus 20 years ago. (Courtesy of the artist)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:32 pm

As part of NPR’s Ecstatic Voices series, reporter Neda Ulaby visited the St. Louis choral group Sounds Of Africa.

The group explores the music of contemporary South African composers, including the African sacred music of composer Ikoli Harcourt Whyte.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

The Polyphonic Spree Makes A Joyful Noise

The Polyphonic Spree, a band based in Dallas, Texas, is on tour with the new album, "Yes, It's True." (Paul Kim/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:32 pm

As he does every week, NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson recommends a new song for us.

This week he shares with us The Polyphonic Spree‘s new track “What Would You Do?” from their album “Yes, It’s True.

Thompson says the song is indicative of the bold, beautiful anthems that populate the album.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Pirates Shift Focus From Somalia To West Africa

A crew of U.S. sailors and Nigerian special forces fighters engages in training exercise off the Nigerian coast in 2010. The U.S. Navy offered training to the Nigerian navy as worries mount of increasingly violent pirate attacks along the West African coast. (Jon Gambrell/AP)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:32 pm

West African leaders have called for the deployment of an international naval force to curb the growing threat of piracy off the Gulf of Guinea.

Piracy in the region needed to be tackled with “firmness,” Ivory Coast’s President Alassane Ouattara said at a meeting of regional leaders.

There are now more pirate attacks off West Africa than off Somalia, maritime groups said last week. Patrols by foreign warships are credited with reducing attacks by Somali pirates.

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NPR Story
1:09 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Doctor Who? The Answer Is Peter Capaldi

Peter Capaldi is pictured at the World Premiere of World War Z at a central London cinema, June 2, 2013. (Joel Ryan/Invision via AP)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:32 pm

Fans of the BBC show “Doctor Who” got the news they’ve been waiting for last night.

During a half-hour special, the BBC announced the name of the actor who will be playing the role of the Doctor in season 8: Scottish actor Peter Capaldi.

The 55-year-old will step into the role in January 2014.

“Doctor Who” has been running on and off since 1963. The show ran from 1963 to 1989 and was revived in 2005.

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NPR Story
1:09 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Bipartisan Bill Aims To Protect NCAA Athletes

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:32 pm

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the organization that regulates college sports, is taking some heat from members of Congress.

The House is considering legislation, called the NCAA Accountability Act, that would require member colleges to guarantee that players’ multi-year scholarships aren’t dropped if they get injured.

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NPR Story
1:09 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

First Lab-Grown Burger Has 'Quite Some Intense Taste'

The world's first lab-grown hamburger is eaten in London. (BBC video screenshot)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:32 pm

The world’s first lab-grown hamburger was cooked and eaten in London today. The burger was grown from stem cells taken from a dead cow.

It cost $325,000 to grow, but researchers believe the technology will eventually reduce the cost of meat production and meet growing demand.

The BBC’s science correspondent, Pallab Ghosh, has had exclusive access to the laboratory in the Netherlands where the meat was grown, and spoke to the researchers involved.

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NPR Story
1:54 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Chef Kathy Gunst Brings Recipes From Alaska

Kathy paddles out onto Tutka Bay in Alaska. (Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 9:09 am

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