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Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

In North Carolina, a project is converting pig waste into renewable natural gas for electricity. The system eliminates pig farms’ methane, a climate change gas, and is helping the state move away from fossil fuels.

James Morrison (@JCMorrisn) reports for WUNC.

It’s May: the start of graduation season. Speakers everywhere will try to live up to the wise words of what was rumored to be Kurt Vonnegut — then revealed to be a column from The Chicago Tribune’s Mary Schmich — which Baz Luhrmann made into a hit in the ’90s.

Two women, including a former NBC correspondent, have accused retired anchor Tom Brokaw of sexually harassing them in the 1990s.

It’s the season of art auctions. Every spring, charities gather donors in ballrooms and galleries across the country, and auction off a range of enticing items — from a weekend at a luxury resort to free yoga classes to fine art. For many nonprofits, it’s their most important fundraising event of the year.

The five black women kicked off the course at the Grandview Golf Club in York, Pennsylvania, last weekend are not sure what happens now.

The women, all middle-aged professionals, members of the club and a broader organization for black female golfers called Sisters in the Fairway, were on the second hole when the owner’s father, Steve Chronister, told them they were playing too slow and offered them a refund to leave.

Author Kirk Johnson‘s new book “The Feather Thief” explores the 2009 theft of rare Victorian-era bird feathers from a British museum by American music student Edwin Rist, who was obsessed with using the feathers for exotic fishing lures.

Inspired by a poem, an art exhibit on sexual assault titled “What Were You Wearing?” re-creates outfits survivors had on when they were assaulted, alongside personal stories.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Jen Brockman, one of the creators of the installation and director of the Sexual Assault Prevention and Education Center at the University of Kansas.

The leaders of North and South Korea meet for the first time since 2007 on Friday. The meeting will set the stage for an expected meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong Un, where the North’s nuclear weapons program will be the main topic.

It’s not easy for a professional musician to give up their own instrument and play with another. But in Nashville, members of the symphony are performing around the city using the “Violins of Hope” — a collection of string instruments that survived the Holocaust.

Emily Siner (@SinerSays) from WPLN has the story.

The Iran nuclear deal will be one of the big items on the agenda Tuesday during French President Emmanuel Macron’s visit with President Trump. Macron wants the U.S. to stick with the deal, but President Trump has been a harsh critic of the agreement.

Here & Now‘s Eric Westervelt (@Ericnpr) speaks with MSNBC’s Ali Velshi (@AliVelshi), co-host of “Velshi & Ruhle.”

President Trump hinted over the weekend that he might grant a posthumous pardon to boxer Jack Johnson. Johnson was the first African-American world heavyweight champion, but he also was the subject of a racially motivated arrest.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Jesse Washington (@jessewashington), senior writer for ESPN’s The Undefeated.

The toymaker Hasbro reported weaker-than-expected earnings Monday, and the company’s CEO pointed to the ongoing liquidation of Toys R Us stores in the U.S. as a cause. Toys R Us was one of Hasbro’s largest customers, and it filed for bankruptcy in September.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young learns more from USA Today’s Charisse Jones (@charissejones).

The Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger is known for his pioneering work describing the form of autism that now bears his name. But previously unexamined documents now show Asperger was also involved with a notorious euthanasia program run by Nazis in Austria.

U.S. troops are involved in combat, counterterrorism or combat support missions in Iraq, Africa, the Philippines and elsewhere. This year marks the American military’s 17th year in Afghanistan.

Editor’s Note: This segment discusses rape and sexual violence, and contains audio that some listeners may find disturbing or offensive.


There have been protests in northern India this week over the rape and murder of an 8-year-old Muslim girl in January. The case has taken a political turn, because two officials from Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s party protested in favor of the accused men, who are Hindus. Those officials resigned last week.

Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner once called himself “unelectable.” Yet the 57-year-old attorney, known for being as outspoken as he is progressive, was sworn into office in January after winning the November election in a landslide.

The list of aging rock ‘n’ roll musicians who have damaged their hearing after a long career on stage is growing.

Huey Lewis and the News canceled its 2018 tour last week after Lewis told fans that he “can’t hear music well enough to sing.”

Eric Clapton told the BBC this year that he is going deaf.

A video that has garnered more than 9 million views on Twitter shows two black men being arrested at a Starbucks in Philadelphia. There have been large protests at the store.

Here & Now‘s Eric Westervelt (@Ericnpr) speaks with WHYY’s Peter Crimmins (@petercrimmins) for the latest.

Inspectors with the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons say they were denied access to the Syrian town of Douma, where a suspected chemical weapons attack on April 7 killed dozens and prompted U.S.-led missile strikes over the weekend.

Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins speaks with NPR’s Michele Keleman (@michelekelemen).

A new report from the Congressional Budget Office predicts the federal deficit will balloon past $1 trillion in the next two years. That takes into account the Republicans 1.5 trillion dollar tax overhaul signed into law last year, and a $1.3 trillion bipartisan spending bill last month.

The Dow opened down 200 points today after the President Tweeted that Russia should “get ready” because missiles “will be coming” at Syria.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Michael Regan (@Reganonymous), senior editor at Bloomberg News.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is testifying before a joint Senate subcommittee hearing Tuesday, amid the ongoing controversy surrounding Facebook’s role in the Cambridge Analytica data leaks.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd discusses the latest with NPR’s Miles Parks (@MilesParks).

The federal deficit is expected to surpass $1 trillion in 2020, according to the Congressional Budget Office. The CBO also predicts that in 10 years the deficit will be about the same size as the country’s gross domestic product.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd looks at the implications of the deficit with MSNBC’s Ali Velshi (@AliVelshi), co-host of “Velshi & Ruhle.”

In his long career as a lawmaker and diplomat, George Mitchell dealt with many of the world’s thorniest problems. He helped broker the Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland, which is marking its 20th anniversary Tuesday.

In the first of two conversations, Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Mitchell about the Middle East, where he also served as an envoy.

A surprising number of animals in the animal kingdom take the idea of “repair” to the next level: They can actually regenerate an entirely new limb, or parts of their hearts and brains, after injury. Scientists around the world are studying this ability in hopes of someday harnessing it for humans.

Paige Pfleger (@PaigePfleger) from WHYY’s The Pulse reports.

With full military honors and an honorary flyover, Thomas Hudner Jr., who received the Medal of Honor in 1951 for bravery during the Korean War, was buried at Arlington National Cemetery on Wednesday.

Here & Now‘s Alex Ashlock (@aashlock) was there for the ceremony, and has this report.

Fifty years ago today, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated as he stood on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. He was 39 years old.

On the 50th anniversary of his death, new biographies of King reveal little-known facets of King’s connections to Boston, and to Robert Kennedy. Fred Thys (@fredthys) from member station WBUR begins with the civil rights leader’s ties to Boston University.

The country’s biggest owner of local television stations is under fire for making its news anchors read a scripted promo decrying “false news” and echoing conservative rhetoric about bias in the media. A compilation of anchors at stations owned or operated by the Sinclair Broadcast Group went viral over the weekend, and President Trump weighed in Monday morning on Twitter.

President Trump called Roseanne Barr to congratulate her on the reboot of her show, “Roseanne.” The revival addresses political issues, even as Barr herself has generated controversy for her sometimes extreme views.

IRS Audits Drop To Lowest Level Since 2002

Mar 29, 2018

If you’re worried about being audited by the IRS, the chances of that happening are increasingly slim. In 2017, the percentage of individual tax audits dropped to its lowest level since 2002, according to data being released Thursday. The decline comes as the IRS has faced budget cuts.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with USA Today’s Charisse Jones(@charissejones).

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