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Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

During a White House press briefing Tuesday, Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders used a familiar tactic when she criticized the news media for producing a “constant barrage of fake news.” The criticism prompted Brian Karem, executive editor of the Montgomery County Sentinel, to interrupt Huckabee Sanders and accuse her of continually trying to undermine the media.

When hair falls on the floor during a haircut, it’s typically swept up and thrown into the trash. But a couple of salons in Nashville are seeking a more useful afterlife for hair clippings.

Amy Eskind of Here & Now contributor Nashville Public Radio reports on the unlikely recycling effort.

Living With Zika: One Mother's Story

Jun 27, 2017

Summer is here and with the heat comes the threat of mosquitoes and the diseases they can spread, like the Zika virus. There are currently 80 infants in the mainland U.S. with birth defects caused by Zika, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The U.S. health system is at the very beginning of learning how to care for those babies.

It’s an intriguing tale of secrets, class and motherhood. “Leaving Lucy Pear” tells the story of a baby who is abandoned under a pear tree in Gloucester, Massachusetts, by her Jewish 18-year-old mother. Bea hopes that an Irish family who steals the fruit in the dark of night will take the infant and raise her as their own.

A Pentagon memo obtained by The Washington Post suggests that some foreign-born U.S. military recruits, who are not yet citizens, could face deportation. The memo describes “potential security threats” of the immigrants who were recruited under a program that fast-tracks citizenship.

'Pharma Bro' Martin Shkreli's Trial Begins

Jun 26, 2017

Former pharmaceutical CEO Martin Shkreli goes on trial starting Monday for federal securities fraud. Shkreli, who became known as “pharma bro,” came under widespread criticism for upping the price of the lifesaving drug Daraprim 5,000 percent. He is going on trial for something unrelated — prosecutors say that he operated a Ponzi-like scheme at two companies he ran.

This week, President Trump will combine his three roles — president, businessman and politician — into one event at the Trump Hotel in Washington. At an expensive fundraiser for his 2020 re-election, he not only will rake in cash for his campaign, but also run up a huge pile of revenues for his business. His latest financial disclosure suggests that it is lucrative for him to spend time at his own properties.

The U.S. took in more than 96,000 refugees last year, and many were children. Some of those children are finishing their first year in American schools.

Diane Orson from Here & Now contributor WNPR reports on an after-school arts program that’s partnered with a local resettlement agency to create a special violin class for some of the 270 young refugees living in New Haven, Connecticut.

A Slow And Steady Approach To Chemotherapy

Jun 22, 2017

When doctors treat cancer with chemotherapy, they usually attack the tumor as aggressively as the patient can bear. Then, after a break, they do it again. And again.

But that hard-hitting chemo tactic can have a downside: a few resistant cancer cells may survive, and the cancer can come back.

The shipping containers that come through the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach every year would wrap around the Earth two times if you laid them out end-to-end. Those containers are filled with electronics and clothing that are manufactured in places like Asia and then shipped to U.S. retailers.

Senate Republicans have spent weeks crafting their latest health care plan to replace the Affordable Care Act in secret

But according to historians Nathan Connolly (@ndbconnolly) and Joanne Freeman (@jbf1755), it’s hardly the first time American politics have been shaped behind closed doors.

Inside The College Meme Craze

Jun 21, 2017

Memes made headlines after Harvard University rescinded acceptances from 10 potential students for discovering offensive images circulated in a private chat. But the college meme craze is much bigger than that.

Saudi Arabia’s stock market closed up more than 5 percent on Wednesday after King Salman announced the person next in line to the throne: his 31-year-old son, Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Middle East analyst F. Gregory Gause of the Bush School at Texas A&M University about the significance of the announcement.

There are dual hearings in Washington on Wednesday related to the ongoing investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets the latest on the House and Senate hearings from NPR’s Greg Myre (@gregmyre1).

World leaders have called President Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accord “regrettable” and “disappointing.” But for Honduran farmers, climate change is personal.

More than a dozen flights have been canceled out of Phoenix on Tuesday because of extreme heat. American Airlines canceled a number of regional flights using the Bombardier CRJ aircraft, which can’t operate above 118 degrees.

Tuesday’s high is expected to reach 120 degrees. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with MSNBC’s Ali Velshi (@AliVelshi) about how planes are impacted by heat.

Nearly 40 percent of universities in a recent national survey reported drops in applications they are getting from overseas. And officials say they know why: concerns about President Trump’s campaign rhetoric and policy proposals.

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear a partisan gerrymandering case out of Wisconsin. It’s the first case of its kind to make it to the high court.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Emily Bazelon (@emilybazelon), staff writer at the New York Times Magazine and a fellow at Yale Law School, about the case’s significance.

On Friday, six members of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS resigned. In an op-ed published in Newsweek, council member Scott Schoettes wrote he and other members could no longer be effective serving a “president who simply does not care.”

Penn State is considering reforms to the school’s fraternities, after video tapes and an investigation showed that Beta Theta Pi pledge Timothy Piazza died after being forced to drink excessively.

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Every year we commemorate the graduation season with folk singer Tom Rush’s performance of Murray McLauchlan’s “Child’s Song.” As Rush tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young, it’s a song that continues to resonate as children grow up and leave home.

A woman who sent her boyfriend a barrage of text messages urging him to kill himself when they were both teenagers was convicted Friday of involuntary manslaughter.

Juvenile Court Judge Lawrence Moniz found that Michelle Carter caused the death of Conrad Roy III. Carter cried as the judge explained his reasoning but remained stoic when the verdict was read.

The Pentagon is expected to send nearly 4,000 additional troops to Afghanistan to help train Afghan forces, according to a U.S. official, who said there’s no word yet on when Secretary of Defense James Mattis will make that announcement.

The Navajo band I Dont Konform sings about oppression and the struggles of life on the reservation. The group recently got the attention of Grammy-winning Metallica producer Flemming Rasmussen, who produced its first album.

A shooting Wednesday at a sprawling UPS warehouse and customer service center in San Francisco sent multiple victims to a hospital, officials said.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young checks in with John Sepulvado (@johnlgc), host of KQED’s California Report.

With reporting from The Associated Press

Hawaii is defying President Trump yet again. This time, by passing legislation that commits the state to follow goals outlined in the Paris climate accord. This comes after Trump withdrew the U.S. from the agreement.

The Mall of America has 520 stores, 18,000 parking spaces, shark tanks and amusement park rides. Starting this week, it also has a poet.

Twenty-seven-year-old Brian Sonia-Wallace beat out 4,000 others for a shot at the Mall of America writer in residence position, celebrating the Bloomington, Minnesota, mall’s 25th birthday.

The gun violence prevention nonprofit Sandy Hook Promise has dropped NBC’s Megyn Kelly as host of its annual gala, over Kelly’s plans to air an interview with conspiracy theorist and Infowars host Alex Jones on her show on Sunday.

Macron's Party Poised For Big Win In France

Jun 12, 2017

The Republic on the Move party is a little more than a year old, but its leader Emmanuel Macron is now the French president, and the party did well in Sunday’s first round of parliamentary elections. It could have a huge majority in the French Parliament after this Sunday’s runoff.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with Florence Villeminot (@flovilleminot) of France 24.

Uber’s board is reportedly weighing a leave of absence for CEO and co-founder Travis Kalanick as part of a broader shake-up to try to improve company culture. The board voted unanimously over the weekend to adopt a range of recommendations from former Attorney General Eric Holder.

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