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Monday through Thursday at 1 p.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One
 

Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

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NPR Story
1:57 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Senate Dems Agree To GOP Plan To Fund Homeland Department

Senate Democrats on Wednesday signed onto a Republican plan to fund the Homeland Security Department without the immigration provisions opposed by President Barack Obama. The announcement by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid put the Senate on track to pass the bill as a partial agency shutdown looms Friday at midnight.

The House’s response was uncertain. Earlier Wednesday, House Republicans reacted tepidly at best to the plan from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who proposed decoupling the issue of DHS funding from immigration.

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NPR Story
1:57 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Will Elizabeth Warren's Populist Message Shape 2016?

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks during a hearing before Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee February 10, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 5:51 pm

Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren is an unusual rookie politician. The freshman senator has a seat at the leadership table and a loudspeaker many veteran politicians would envy. Her fans are hoping she’ll run for president in 2016, but Warren insists she’s not. So what is Senator Warren’s emerging role in the Democratic Party? From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Asma Khalid of WBUR reports.

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NPR Story
1:57 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Refinery Strike Continues Into Fourth Week

Members of the United Steelworkers Union and other supporting unions picket outside the BP refinery on February 10, 2015 in Whiting, Indiana. Workers at the BP refinery walked off the job Sunday morning after failing to reach an agreement on a new contract. They join workers at other oil refineries and plants in the first nationwide refinery strike since 1980. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

A nationwide oil refinery strike continued this week and expanded to 15 plants. The United Steelworkers union organized the walkout, after the union’s contract with oil companies expired.

One of the latest refineries to be impacted is the Motiva Enterprises refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, the largest of its kind in the country. CNN’s Maggie Lake joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Uber's New Turf: Mid-Sized Cities

Des Moines, Iowa, is one of the mid-sized cities where Uber is expanding. (Ron Reiring/Wikimedia Commons)

The car-for-hire service Uber has been elbowing its way into big cities across the country, sparking controversies with taxis and regulators.

Last month, the San Francisco-based company raised $1.6 billion in financing, which it is using to fund international expansion.

Closer to home, the company is setting its sights on mid-sized cities, looking to expand its market into areas where taxi service is not as much a part of the culture.

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Revisiting Ransom Riggs' Latest 'Peculiar Children' Book

Ransom Riggs‘ novel “Hollow City” comes out in paperback today. It’s the second of his “Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children” series about children with supernatural powers.

Like its predecessor, “Hollow City” is based on vintage black and white photographs that Riggs finds and writes stories around.

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

19 Manatees Rescued From Storm Drain In Florida

Early this morning, 19 manatees were rescued from a drain pipe in Satellite Beach, Florida, south of Cape Canaveral. Florida has been experiencing colder than average temperatures, and the endangered animals were probably seeking warmer waters in the drainpipe.

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NPR Story
1:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Oversight Of Home Caregivers Said To Be Lacking

Toni Giusto keeps a box within reach filled with the pens, paper and letters to keep her busy. (Heidi de Marco/KHN)

With the aging of the U.S. population, more elderly and disabled people than ever are receiving care in their own homes.

In California, the state pays for relatives and other caregivers for low-income residents. The program has a $7 billion budget and serves nearly half a million people.

But there’s concern that there’s not enough oversight to keep people safe. Anna Gorman of Kaiser Health News has the story.

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NPR Story
1:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Redesigning Houston's METRO System Without Breaking The Bank

Maps of the existing Houston transit system (left) and the new plan (right). (transitsystemreimagining.com)

While parts of the nation saw serious failures in public transit in the last few weeks, Houston was busy approving a new transit project that would overhaul the entire METRO bus network without increasing operating costs.

The plan seeks to broaden the system, allowing riders to get to most areas of the city without relying on infrequent buses. But that comes with a trade-off: by cutting low-rider routes, some may be left without public transportation.

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NPR Story
1:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

White House Pushes For Tougher Rules On Retirement Funds

Today, the Obama administration is expected to show its support of a Department of Labor proposal about Americans’ retirement savings.

The measure would require brokers to act in their client’s best interest, meaning that it would be harder for them to push people towards high-fee products and funds, but industry officials say it’s unnecessary and could be bad for investors.

Jill Schlesinger of CBS News joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the proposal and its implications.

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NPR Story
3:25 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

Greece And Eurozone Creditors Reach Deal, Official Says

Greece and its European creditors have reached a deal over the country’s request to extend its bailout.

An official close to discussions, who spoke only on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to comment publicly, says a deal was reached between the two sides at Friday’s meeting of finance ministers in Brussels.

The official said that, as part of the agreement, Greece could “present a first list of reform measures by Monday” for the country’s debt inspectors to assess.

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NPR Story
3:25 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

A Mother's Battle Against Medical Errors

Alyssa Hemmelgarn reading a book. Alyssa died shortly after being diagnosed with leukemia. (Courtesy of Hemmelgarn family)

Hundreds of thousands of people in the U.S. die from medical errors every year. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States.

Carole Hemmelgarn is on a mission to help medical professionals avoid errors. She says the healthcare system failed her family and her daughter.

“I had a 9-year-old daughter, named Alyssa, and she was diagnosed with leukemia on a Monday and she died 10 days later,” said Hemmelgarn.

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NPR Story
3:25 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

Home Sick? Try These Recipes

Kathy Gunst's avgolemono soup (Greek-style chicken-lemon-orzo soup) with Meyer lemon and dill is a delicious, soothing and healing winter soup. (Kathy Gunst)

What do you like to eat when you’re sick? Chicken soup? The comfort foods you grew up with? Something hot and spicy? Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst brings in some of her ideas, including her ginger tea, Greek lemon soup and her own chicken soup recipe.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Thu February 19, 2015

Trillions Of Dollars In Household Debt Dragging Americans Down

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 6:18 pm

Household debt is on the rise again. Economists at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York have released a new report showing our debts – including mortgages, credit cards, car loans and student loans – have been shooting up, even though the economy has been improving.

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NPR Story
1:35 pm
Thu February 19, 2015

Injecting Creativity Into Overscheduled Lives

Danny Gregory sketched this picture of himself sketching breakfast. (Danny Gregory)

Think you’re too busy to be creative? How about taking a few minutes to draw your breakfast? That’s just one of the suggestions from artist and author Danny Gregory in his new book “Art Before Breakfast: A Zillion Ways to be More Creative No Matter How Busy You Are” (excerpt below).

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NPR Story
1:35 pm
Thu February 19, 2015

Steve Inskeep's Reporter’s Notebook: The Opening Up Of Iran

On the anniversary of Iran’s 1979 revolution, young women pass by a banner proclaiming, “America Owes Humanity.” (Steve Inskeep and Molly Messick via NPR's On The Road Tumblr)

NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is recently back from Iran, where he visited three different cities and interviewed dozens of people in a matter of days.

He arrived amid celebrations marking the anniversary of the Iranian revolution, marked with clear anti-American sentiment. But as Iran, the U.S. and other countries continue to negotiate a possible nuclear deal, Inskeep met many people there who are open to changing the strained relationship with the United States.

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Wed February 18, 2015

Toymakers Face Shifting Market

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 6:22 pm

The International Toy Fair wrapped up in New York City this week, as the industry deals with shifting demand. Children have become interested in playing games on tablets and mobile phones.

CNN’s Maggie Lake interviewed a number of CEOs about how their companies are dealing with the new landscape. She joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

Guest

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NPR Story
1:23 pm
Wed February 18, 2015

Sampling Chinese Cuisines With Ming Tsai

Chinese New Year begins tomorrow. We celebrate by revisiting our conversation last year with James Beard Award-winning chef Ming Tsai. Ming came into our studios to share some New Year’s customs and take Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson on a taste tour of four different Chinese cuisines: Mandarin, Hunan, Szechwan and Cantonese.

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NPR Story
1:23 pm
Wed February 18, 2015

Jehovah's Witness Leaders Accused Of Covering Up Child Sexual Abuse

Jehovah's Witnesses have been using the 1st amendment to hide child sexual abuse claims, according to Reveal and the Center for Investigative Reporting. (Image via revealnews.org)

It’s been 13 years since the Catholic Church sexual abuse scandal broke. Now, a new investigation finds that the leaders of the Jehovah’s Witnesses have instructed elders to keep cases of child sexual abuse a secret, both from law enforcement and from their own congregations.

Memos from the religion’s parent organization, the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York, show this policy dates back at least 25 years.

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NPR Story
1:13 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

A Young Malcolm X, Through The Eyes Of His Daughter

American civil rights activist Malcolm X (1925 - 1965) speaks at a podium during a Black Muslim rally in Washington DC, circa 1963. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 5:33 pm

Ilyasah Shabazz is Malcolm X’s daughter and co-author of a new young adult novel based on her father’s teen years.

X: A Novel” focuses on when Malcolm X, then known as Malcolm Little, dropped out of school after the death of his father and started using drugs and breaking into houses.

That behavior eventually led to his imprisonment, which is where he came into contact with Islam.

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NPR Story
1:13 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

Aging HIV-Positive Population Faces Challenges

Michael Hawkins, 56, contracted HIV when he was in his late 20s. He now joins a growing number of older Americans living with the virus. (Aundrea Murray, WNPR)

America is growing older, and so is its population of HIV-positive adults. This year, for the first time ever, half of Americans living with HIV are 50 years old and older.

For many of them, life presents a unique set of challenges. Among those challenges is increased social isolation.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Lydia Brown of WNPR reports.

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NPR Story
1:11 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

Meet The New Top Dog Judge At Westminster

A Komondorok being groomed in the benching area at Pier 92 and 94 in New York City on the 2nd day of competition at the 139th Annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show February 17, 2015. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 3:08 pm

The Westminster Kennel Club 139th Annual Dog Show concludes tonight with the much-anticipated anointing of the Best in Show dog.

Taking to the ring to judge that dog will be David Merriam. Merriam is a retired judge, champion breeder of bull terriers and past chairman of board of the American Kennel Club, but this will be his first time judging the Best in Show dog at Westminster.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Mon February 16, 2015

Greece Rejects New Bailout Offer From Europe

The eurozone’s top official on Monday effectively gave Greece an ultimatum to request an extension to the country’s bailout program, a proposal Athens has so far rejected stridently.

Greece and its eurozone creditors have been at an impasse over how to lighten the country’s bailout loans.

Athens would like to scrap the existing bailout program and instead agree on a “bridging program” to support its finances. Greece’s new government blames the current bailout program for inflicting budget austerity on the country and has promised its electors it would get rid of it.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Mon February 16, 2015

6 Tips From An Online Dating Coach

Looking for love online? Dating coach Kimberly Koehler has some advice to share. (Ashley Bishop/Flickr)

Online dating is now a billion-dollar business. Singles have their choice of a number of Internet services through apps and websites that range from totally free to very costly.

There are also online dating coaches, like Kimberly Koehler. She charges $200 for her online class teaching dating strategies. She also offers one-on-one dating coaching for $495.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Mon February 16, 2015

Water Cooler: Social Media News From SNL To #BOSnow

Will Ferrell and Cheri Oteri play "Spartan Cheerleaders" in a skit on "Saturday Night Live." (Mary Ellen Matthews/NBC via AP)

Annie Colbert of Mashable joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to take a look at how the news is reverberating on social media, from meteorologist Jim Cantore’s celebration over “thundersnow” in Plymouth, Mass., to Saturday Night Live’s 40 year anniversary celebration.

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NPR Story
1:55 pm
Fri February 13, 2015

Love Lessons From WNYC's 'Death, Sex & Money'

Anna Sale is the host and managing editor of the WNYC podcast "Death, Sex & Money." (Amy Pearl/WNYC)

For nearly a year, Anna Sale has been talking to people about love and life – and not just the fun parts. She’s the host of “Death Sex & Money,” a podcast from WNYC about “the things we think about a lot, and need to talk about more.”

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NPR Story
1:55 pm
Fri February 13, 2015

Parents Of Slain Hostage Ask The U.S. To Do More

Diane and John Foley, parents of journalist James Foley, sit for a portrait at their home during an interview August 24, 2014, in Rochester, New Hampshire. (Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images)

Earlier this week, we spoke to the parents of Austin Tice, a former marine and freelance journalist kidnapped in Syria in 2012. Marc and Debra Tice said they’ve received little assistance from the Syrian and U.S. governments in securing the safe release of their son.

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NPR Story
1:55 pm
Fri February 13, 2015

Expedia And Orbitz To Merge In The Face Of Competition

Expedia has reached a deal to buy Orbitz in order to strengthen their enterprise against competition. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Expedia has reached a deal to buy Orbitz, as both travel companies try to defend their turf from the likes of Google and Airbnb.

The companies are also facing competition from hotels and airlines who are increasingly doing business through their own websites.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Michael Regan of Bloomberg News about the implications for the industry.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Thu February 12, 2015

Eavesdropping On The Ocean

(Graphic by Rachel Feierman via WHYY)

Originally published on Thu February 12, 2015 3:32 pm

There’s a layer in the ocean – in between the warm surface waters and the deep, high pressured waters – where sound waves move more slowly. The so-called SOFAR channel is a sweet spot of ocean acoustics.

American and Soviet researchers independently discovered the channel in the 1940s. The U.S. military deployed hydrophones in the underwater channel for surveillance purposes, and today still uses them for scientific research.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Thu February 12, 2015

DJ Sessions: Fusing Jazz, Classical And Roots

The Fretful Porcupine is Jake Armerding (strings) and Kevin Gosa (saxophones). (thefretfulporcupine.com)

Originally published on Thu February 12, 2015 2:41 pm

For this week’s DJ Session, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson sits down with Julie Lavender, a jazz musician and host of Dream Farm Radio in New Hampshire. She shares some of her favorite new eclectic jazz, from artist Mark Shilansky and the group The Fretful Porcupine.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Thu February 12, 2015

Oil Isn't The Only Commodity That's Taken a Nosedive

Oil prices have fallen nearly 60 percent since June, but it’s not the only commodity that’s dropping in value. Grains, metals and other bulk products have been plunging too.

Since February 2011, copper has fallen from $4.50 a pound to $2.53; corn fell from $7.50 a bushel to $3.88. The changes have a put a squeeze on farmers and miners, but so far they haven’t really trickled down to consumers.

NPR’s Marilyn Geewax joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

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