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Monday through Thursday at 1 p.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One
 

Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

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NPR Story
2:56 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Why This Gaza Ceasefire Is Holding

Palestinians wave Hamas flags as they celebrate in Gaza City on August 27, 2014, during a rally following a deal hailed by Israel and the Islamist movement as 'victory' in the 50-day war. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

The latest ceasefire between the militant group Hamas and Israel appears to be holding, allowing thousands of Palestinians to return home and Israelis to send children back to school without worrying about rocket fire.

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NPR Story
1:56 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

'Exoskeleton' Lets Some Paraplegics Walk Again

Gene Laureano, a 51-year-old Army veteran from the Bronx, uses the ReWalk exoskeleton. (Sacha Pfeiffer/WBUR)

One of the great dreams of the medical research world is to help paralyzed people who are unable to use their legs, to be able to walk again.

Implanting electrode stimulators into injured spinal cords has shown some promise. Stem cell spinal cord regeneration has been elusive so far. But one Massachusetts tech company is taking a completely different approach.

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NPR Story
1:56 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Snapchat Reportedly Valued At $10 Billion

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the Silicon Valley venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers has agreed to invest in Snapchat at a valuation of around $10 billion.

Derek Thompson of The Atlantic joins Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer to take a look at why the photo messaging app is valued so high, even though it has very little revenue.

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NPR Story
4:12 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

35 Years Later, Kate Bush's Stage Return Has Fans Buzzing

British singer-songwriter Kate Bush is returning to the stage after a 35-year absence. (katebush.com)

When British singer-songwriter Kate Bush announced that she would return to the stage after a 35-year absence, her devoted fans immediately began snapping up tickets.

All 77,000 seats for her series of London concerts sold out in 15 minutes, with fans planning to fly in from around the world. Tonight is the first show.

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NPR Story
4:12 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

Senate Tracker: Colorado, The New Swing State

In Colorado's Senate race, Democratic U.S. Senator Mark Udall (left) is being challenged by Colorado Congressman Cory Gardner (right). (U.S. Senate, U.S. House)

In the latest installment of Senate Tracker, our weekly look at Senate races across the country, Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer turns to Megan Verlee of Colorado Public Radio for a look at the race there.

Republican Congressman Cory Gardner is trying to unseat Democratic incumbent Senator Mark Udall, in a race that is very close and is bringing issues of women’s rights and the president’s health care law into play.

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NPR Story
4:12 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

Volvo Rolls Out First New SUV Under Chinese Ownership

The XC90 is the first Volvo in about a decade to be without Ford Motor parts. (volvocars.com)

The Volvo XC90 makes it debut today. It’s the first Volvo model to be released by Zheijiang Geely Holding Co., the Chinese company that took over the Swedish brand from Ford in 2010.

The XC90 is the first Volvo in about a decade to be made without Ford Motor parts. As Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal tells Here & Now’s Robin Young, Volvo hopes this SUV will be a game-changer for the company, as it pursues the international market.

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NPR Story
2:34 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

Burger King... Of Canada?

Burger King is looking to buy Canada’s coffee and doughnut chain Tim Hortons. (Mike Mozart/Flickr)

Burger King, the American fast-food restaurant operator, is looking to buy Canada’s coffee and doughnut chain Tim Hortons.

Burger King announced yesterday the two companies are in talks to form a deal that it says would help it compete with similar companies.

Skeptics say it would allow Burger King to move its headquarters to Canada, lowering its tax bill. NPR’s Marilyn Geewax talks to Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer about what a deal could mean.

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NPR Story
2:34 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

What Sound Can Tell You About Dangerous Places

A sign warns of high radiation levels in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. (Trey Ratcliff/Flickr)

Sound artist Peter Cusack travels the world recording sounds from dangerous places. The places are not particularly dangerous to the short-term visitor, like war zones, but places where there are dangers to the environment, and to the people who live there, such as Chernobyl and the old oil fields of Azerbaijan.

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NPR Story
2:34 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

Pediatricians Group: Delay School Start Times So Teens Can Sleep

The American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending middle schools and high schools start later so teenagers can get more sleep. (JF Sebastian/Flickr)

Many studies have shown that the average adolescent doesn’t get enough sleep, and that can cause physical and mental health issues. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is now recommending middle and high schools delay their class start times to 8:30 a.m. or later.

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NPR Story
2:52 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

Legal Battle Could Prevent Opening Of Popular Utah Ski Mountain

The ski season at Park City Mountain Resort is now up in the air because of a protracted fight over the rights to the slopes. (Kimberly Brown-Azzarello/Flickr)

Park City, Utah, is best known for the famous Sundance Film Festival that it hosts every winter, as well as being home to one of the most popular ski resorts in the country: Park City Mountain Resort.

But the future of that mountain, and the 2014-2015 ski season, is now up in the air because of a protracted and very public fight over the rights to the slopes.

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NPR Story
2:52 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

As Kurdish Troops Fight Islamic Militants, Kurdish Media Goes Global

The United States has been drawn back into Iraq, and the pull this time is the Kurdish region.

There might be strategic, economic and humanitarian reasons for it, but one Iraqi Kurdish journalist says the media should take some credit for the world turning its attention to a once-ignored people.

Yerevan Saeed of the Irbil-based news outlet Rudaw, joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to explain why.

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NPR Story
2:52 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

Yellen's Signals On Interest Rates Still Unclear

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen arrives for a dinner during the Jackson Hole Economic Policy Symposium at the Jackson Lake Lodge in Grand Teton National Park near Jackson, Wyo. Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. (John Locher/AP)

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen spoke at an annual Fed conference in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, today and offered no clear sign the Fed would raise interest rates this year.

Yellen’s remarks were highly anticipated, as the economy and labor market improves. But disagreement among Fed officials is growing over fears the U.S. isn’t getting a handle on inflation before it becomes a problem.

Yellen said Friday that while unemployment has gone down, other economic indicators have been harder to evaluate.

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NPR Story
1:35 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

The Challenges Of Recruiting An All-Volunteer Army

New recruits swear in during the Army Reserve Mega Event in Whitehall, Ohio, June 22, 2013. (Andrew Baba/U.S. Army)

The U.S. Army has been an all-volunteer force for more than 40 years because there is no military draft anymore. That means the service has to attract young men and women to sign up.

And according to the Army’s numbers they’re pretty good at it. The Army has met or exceeded its recruiting goals for each of the last nine years.

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Recipes To Make The Most Of Summer Tomatoes

The tomato bounty from Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst's garden in Maine. (Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 3:30 pm

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst joins hosts Jeremy Hobson and Meghna Chakrabarti with the summer’s bounties from her garden — tomatoes of all shapes and sizes. She has all sorts of ideas for how to cook with them, and shares these recipes:

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

CDC Director On Release Of American Ebola Patients

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Dr. Tom Frieden testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, before the House subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations hearing on "Combating the Ebola Threat." (Molly Riley/AP)

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 3:48 pm

As both American Ebola patients who were brought from Liberia to Atlanta for treatment are released, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks to Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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NPR Story
2:13 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Modern-Day Dust Bowl Isn't Easy, But It Beats The 1930s

Farmer John Schweiser, 80, has had to take shelter from recent dust storms. He also lived through the Dust Bowl in the 1930s. (Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media)

The historic drought that continues to hammer the West shows no signs off abating. Most of California remains in severe drought conditions, with its groundwater aquifers in danger of being depleted. Officials in Los Angeles have beefed up their use of “water cops” to make sure people aren’t wasting water.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Bumper U.S. Corn Yield Could Top Records

Early rains, cooler temperatures and hardier seeds have led to projections of a record harvest of corn this year. Most of that corn is used for livestock feed and ethanol.

Because of the predicted glut, corn prices have dropped by 13 percent this year.

Bryce Knorr of Farm Futures magazine tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that consumers can expect to see prices drop at the gas pump, but not at the grocery store.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

In Liberia, Ebola Quarantine Sparks Riots

Members of Liberia's Ebola Task Force enforce a quarantine on the West Point slum on August 20, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. (John Moore/Getty Images)

In Liberia this morning, security forces attempted to quarantine the West Point neighborhood in the capital Monrovia, but residents broke out in a riot.

The Ebola holding center in West Point has been keeping residents on edge. On Saturday, an angry mob attacked the center, chasing and carrying out patients.

NPR photographer David Gilkey talks to Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabari about what he saw this morning as the riots began.

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Man Dead After Officer-Involved Shooting In St. Louis

Authorities in St. Louis say a man has been shot dead by police after brandishing a knife at officers. The shooting took place in the north St. Louis area, a few miles from the suburb of Ferguson, where there have been protests for more than a week following the shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a police officer.

The Wall Street Journal’s Ben Kesling tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that it’s not clear if the shooting today has any connection to the protests in Ferguson.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

How Flight Changed The World - And What Might Be Next

First flight of the Wright Flyer I, December 17, 1903, Orville piloting, Wilbur running at wingtip. (John T. Daniels/Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 2:53 pm

Today is National Aviation Day, the date chosen in part because it’s the birthday of Orville Wright, who flew the very first airplane in 1903, with his brother Wilbur Wright.

Astronaut Neil Armstrong carried at piece of wood and some fabric from the Wright brothers’ 1903 flyer to the moon, connecting the first airplane flight to space exploration.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

California Tries To Lure Film Industry Back Home

California has watched its dominance over the film and TV industry wane as other states, and even other countries, offer producers lucrative tax incentives. This has cost the state thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in lost economic output.

Now California is fighting back. A bill is moving through the state legislature that would quadruple the amount of tax incentives available to TV and movie makers each year.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Home Construction Jumps, Even As Housing Market Cools

New data from the Commerce Department on home construction shows new construction climbed more than 15 percent in July from the previous month, and applications for building permits jumped 8 percent.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Dollar General Makes $9.7 Billion Bid For Family Dollar

A Family Dollar store is seen on July 28, 2014, in Hallandale, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Today, Dollar General said it wants to buy Family Dollar in an all-cash deal worth $9.7 billion. That proposal tops an earlier bid from another dollar store, Dollar Tree, for the same company last month.

NPR’s Marilyn Geewax talks to Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about what the deal means in the larger context of the American economy, and why there’s so much competition for the dollar store.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Revisiting Tom Hardy's Solo Performance In 'Locke'

“Locke,” a film about a construction manager whose life unravels as he drives from Birmingham to London, was one of the top DVD rentals of the weekend, according to Redbox.

The film’s star, Tom Hardy, is the sole actor to appear onscreen. Through the course of the film, his character makes phone calls revealing how his trip has managed to put both his job and his marriage in jeopardy.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

One Key To Getting A Green Card: Luck

An example of the "Green Card" issued by the Immigration and Naturalization Service is seen in an undated handout photo. (Khue Bui/AP)

Last year, while the president and Congress were arguing over the future of comprehensive immigration reform, nearly a million people got a green card — permission to live legally and permanently — in the United States.

A green card is the ultimate prize for would-be immigrants across the globe, but getting one is very difficult. In some cases, it’s a matter of sheer luck.

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NPR Story
6:14 pm
Fri August 15, 2014

Malls On The Decline Find New Ways To Stay Relevant

In addition to traditional shopping mall attractions like shops, restaurants, and movie theaters, the largest U.S. mall -- the Mall of America -- also includes an amusement park, an aquarium, and several museum exhibit spaces. (Jeremy Noble/Flickr)

Shopping malls are a part of American culture — people go to malls to socialize, eat and, of course, buy. But as purchases are increasingly just a click away online, malls have been losing money.

NPR’s Sonari Glinton has been reporting a series on shopping malls across America, and he joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss why some malls are doing better than others, and the creative new ideas that some malls are adopting to attract customers.

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NPR Story
6:14 pm
Fri August 15, 2014

Phoenix Public Schools Compete For Students

Public schools like South Mountain in Phoenix, Ariz. are trying all kinds of ways to market themselves, from old-school fliers to radio and TV spots. (Stina Sieg/KJZZ)

It’s still August, but school has already started up in some parts of the country. And even though classes may be underway, the effort to get more students enrolled continues at full speed.

It’s not only private schools that are marketing themselves to prospective students and their parents. Public schools are also fighting for their attention.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, KJZZ’s Stina Sieg reports from Phoenix.

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NPR Story
6:14 pm
Fri August 15, 2014

Panama Canal Turns 100

Tourists take pictures of Pedro Miguel Locks during a boat trip through the Panama Canal, on August 12. August 15 marks the 100th anniversary of the Panama Canal, considered to be one of the 20th century's marvels of engineering and through which goes five percent of the maritime world trade.(Rodrigo Arangua/AFP/Getty Images)

The Panama Canal opened 100 years ago today. As it celebrates its centennial, the canal is also undergoing an expansion. And it faces potential competition from a planned expansion of the Suez Canal in Egypt, and plans to construct a canal in Nicaragua.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Bill Faries of Bloomberg News about the work being done on the canal and what we can expect from all this construction.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Self Portraits, Nashville Style

Bryce McCloud (right) and his assistant Elizabeth Williams, who run a mobile self-portrait project called Our Town in Nashville, TN, pose with their own portraits. (Nina Cardona/WPLN)

Most people aren't in the habit of making self portraits, especially not with rubber stamps and an ink pad. But that's exactly the challenge a year-long, roaming art project called “Our Town” is posing to citizens of Nashville, Tenn.

From the Here and Now Contributors Network, Nina Cardona WPLN has the story.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Eventful Summer For Women In Male Sports

WNBA star Becky Hammon takes questions from the media at the San Antonio Spurs practice facility after being introduced as an assistant coach with the team on Tuesday, Aug. 5 in San Antonio. Hammon became the first woman to be a full-time, paid assistant on an NBA staff. (Bahram Mark Sobhani/AP)

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 1:25 pm

It’s been an eventful summer so far for women in male sports.

The San Antonio Spurs just hired Becky Hammon as a full-time assistant coach. She’s the first woman to hold that job in the NBA.

She was hired just a few weeks after the Clippers made a historic hire of their own, naming Natalie Nakase as the first woman assistant coach in the NBA’s Summer League.

Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca, joins host Jeremy Hobson to discuss whether these changes indicate a shift in the league.

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