Classical Music in the Afternoon

Weekdays at 1 p.m. on IPR Classical

Could ours be a golden age of classical music? Around the world and around our state, people are writing music that goes straight to the heart, and performing older masterworks with the fluency of people speaking a native tongue. Barney's mission is to make it easy for you to connect to this new era of classical excellence, while providing you with musical companionship you can count on every afternoon.

NOTE: When searching for a particular date's playlist, please set your date parameters one date newer than the day you want to review. For example, if you would like to view a playlist from the 12th, set your search date as the 13th.

Ways To Connect

Tonight at the University of Iowa College of Public Health, the award-winning composer Laura Kaminsky, painter Rebecca Allen, physicist Robert Davies, and The Fry Street Quartet will join forces for an interdisciplinary exploration of climate change called The Crossroads Project. It's part of a

Just an ordinary weekend in Iowa: Sure, if you were in London you could hear the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra's Beethoven and Bruckner, and next weekend, see Sadler's Wells dance a Stravinsky double-bill. But think of the traffic and the cost of living! Meanwhile, here in Iowa? This month's Iowa Arts Showcase, which you can hear Saturday at 11 or 5, gives some in-depth background, but meanwhile  - check it out:

It's Bach's Birthday! - or is it? The calendars in Eisenach on the day of his birth read March 21st, but back in 1685 Thuringians were  still using the Julian calendar, so our equivalent date is "March 31st," ("equivalent" in being about ten days after the vernal equinox). But old habits die hard, especially addictive ones, and Bach is by far my primary addiction. How about if we just party for ten days?

Iowa's orchestras are commissioning works about Iowa; but how can music without words convey anything about a place? Some examples:

Sean Henri from Wikipedia

I’ve put it off all week, but the public clamor is getting overwhelming…um, would you believe a single email?... so: On to the follow-up! In my last post, I explained why my trusty ideas about “what makes music classical” now seem confused, and I promised to follow up with a more viable approach. Here's a start. I don’t want to oversell it; at best, it’s only part of the answer. But for me, it helps clear at least some of the fog. 

Barney Sherman

If you missed the in-studio live set of Renaissance music by Fathom, not to worry - Fortune has smiled on you! You can listen to the mp3 with the widget below or to a WAV file at this link.  The group performed music written from the 1400s through February, 2014 (by Mary Larew, a native of Iowa and member of Fathom), all of it focused on the theme of Lady Luck. The six members of Fathom each have distinguished careers in early music (and in some cases, new music as well). They are:

Tune in at 3pm for a live in-studio concert of Renaissance music by the NY-based group Fathom.  Its six members, including two Iowans, have distinguished careers in early music (and in some cases, new music as well). They are:

Quick: define “classical music.”  It may sound easy, but most of my attempts have been dead ends. They don't get you to much of the music. Later I’ll discuss a definition that I think works - it covers everything, and helps explain why classical music matters to us. But first let me give you a tour of some of the blind alleys.

Photo by Ciuin Ferrin; used with permission

With all eyes on Sochi, here's a little IPR extra for the ears: two masters of the Russian 7-string guitar, Oleg Timofeyev and Vadim Kolpakov, who came into our studios last November to play original and traditional music. They told me about composing Roma music in Moscow, performing with Eugene Hutz at Madonna's birthday party, and reading a scene in Dostoevsky that connects Roma and Klezmer musicians. And they demonstrated the special sound and style of their instruments.

Andy Doe, properdiscord.com

Last month on Talk of Iowa, IPR’s Charity Nebbe hosted four Iowa music directors–

Orchestra Iowa

When Barney Sherman started planning his career in classical music, his supervisor told him, “Don’t even think about it, classical music is dying…the stations are closing, everyone’s looking for another career, it’s over.” But, 23 years later, Sherman is a Senior Music Producer at Iowa Public Radio, and Iowa’s classical industry is thriving.

Not that Iowa’s symphonies have not gone through some evolution.

When I spoke with Charity Nebbe about favorite classical CDs of 2013, time was short, so I cut my list to 10 that I thought might appeal to the widest range of listeners. But my actual list is much longer.

Join host Jacqueline Halbloom during the 2 o'clock for an exclusive in-studio preview performance of Robert Lindsey-Nassif's new opera, Frankenboy: A Monsteropera. Composed for the Cedar Rapids Opera Theatre, Frankenboy is a one-act opera that presents an anti-bullying message aimed at young audiences.

Join Iowa Public Radio’s senior music producer Jacqueline Halbloom during the 3 o’clock hour for an interview with the Artistic Director of the Des Moines Metro Opera, Michael Egel. Mr. Egel will discuss details about the DMMO’s Fortieth Anniversary Season running between June 22nd to July 15th.

Join host Jacqueline Halbloom during the 3 o'clock hour as she interviews pianist Barry Douglas regarding his upcoming performance with the Des Moines Symphony. A Tchaikovsky Gold Medalist, Douglas will be featured on Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 3 as part of the DMSO's Season Finale concert, scheduled for May 12 and 13, 2012.

University of Northern Iowa faculty artist Hunter Capoccioni, double bass, joins Jacqueline during the 3 o'clock hour to discuss his upcoming involvement in Music to Commemorate the Passover Season and the Holocaust.

During the 2 o’clock hour, Jacqueline will be speaking by phone with cellist Emanuel Wehse, a member of the Morgenstern Trio. The Morgenstern Trio is appearing in concert on Thursday evening at 7:30 in the Great Hall of the University of Northern Iowa’s Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center. The Trio will perform Debussy’s Piano Trio in G, Mozart’s Trio for Piano, Violin, Cello, K. 564, and Smetana’s Piano Trio in g minor, Op. 15.

The University of Northern Iowa’s Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education, Dr. Stephen Gaies will join Jacqueline during the 2 o’clock hour to talk about his collaboration with the Jewish

Music Director of the Waterloo-Cedar Falls Symphony Jason Weinberger stops by the studio during the 2 p.m. hour to discuss the WCFSO's performance of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring on Saturday, April 14, 2012.

Lynne Rossetto Kasper, acclaimed author and host of American Public Media's The Splendid Table, joins Jacqueline during the 3 o'clock hour to discuss her role in the upcoming The Art of Chocolate by the Cedar Rapids Opera Theatre.

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