All Things Considered

Hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Pat Blank

Weekdays at 4 p.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One
 

Every weekday, "All Things Considered" hosts Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features.

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Around the Nation
3:30 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

A Damned Dam On The Penobscot River

Next week, the Great Works Dam on the Penobscot River in Maine will be removed.
John Clarke Russ Bangor Daily News

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 6:41 pm

Like most members of the Penobscot Nation, Scott Phillips grew up near the Penobscot River and learned to paddle and fish as a young boy. He took to it like a duck to water. He became a competitive racer and eventually opened his own business selling canoes, kayaks and other outdoor gear.

Next week, the first of two dams on the river will be removed, altering the way it's used recreationally. The change could also be a boon to Phillip's business.

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Author Interviews
3:13 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

Steve Guttenberg Writes His Own 'Bible'

Steve Guttenberg (left), Michael Winslow (center) and G.W. Bailey star in 1987's Police Academy 4: Citizens On Patrol, part of the film franchise launched by 1984's Police Academy.
Warner Bros./Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 6:41 pm

When Steve Guttenberg was 16, he went to see an agent about starting his acting career.

That agent told him: "You are the last guy I would pick to be a movie star."

Guttenberg decided to become an actor anyway.

The summer before he was supposed to start the University of Albany, he moved from Long Island to Los Angeles to try his luck. Once there, he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, he snuck onto the Paramount Studios lot, set up his own office, and started making phone calls to agents and producers.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
12:31 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

The Movie Jared Harris Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Dustin Hoffman in Sydney Pollack's 1982 film, Tootsie.
Columbia / The Kobal Collection Columbia

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 12:28 pm

The Weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actor Jared Harris, whose credits include The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, and AMC's TV drama Mad Men, the movie he can't get enough of is Sydney Pollack's Tootsie. "It's just so brilliant," says Harris.

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Music Interviews
11:03 am
Sat June 9, 2012

'Call Me Maybe': Behind The Song Of The Summer

Carly Rae Jepsen is the 26-year-old singer behind the inescapable pop hit "Call Me Maybe."
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 10:57 am

"It's happened a few times, yes," Carly Rae Jepsen says. "And they usually think that they're the first person to do it."

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Middle East
5:37 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

In A Syrian Village, Evidence Of A Slaughter

Anti-government protesters in the northern Syrian village of Hass protest on Thursday following the deaths of dozens of civilians a day earlier in the village of Mazraat al-Qubair. The banner reads, "The al-Qubair massacre challenges the world's humanity."
Edlib News Network AP

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 9:03 pm

NPR correspondent Deborah Amos joined U.N. monitors and a small group of journalists Friday who were able to enter the Syrian village of Mazraat al-Qubair, where 78 people, including women and children, were killed on Wednesday by pro-government forces, according to opposition activists.

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Around the Nation
4:09 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Disastrous S.D. Flood Caused National Wake Up Call

The 1972 flood in Rapid City, S.D., killed 238 people and destroyed more than 1,300 homes. The city responded by establishing a no-build zone in the flood plain. Other cities across the country adopted similar policies after the disaster.
Courtesy of Minnelusa Historical Association, Journey Museum

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 8:57 pm

Survivors say the wall of water was like a tsunami that destroyed nearly everything in its path as it roared through a Black Hills canyon and into town. The flash flood that hit Rapid City, S.D., on June 9, 1972, was one of the worst floods in U.S. history. It killed 238 people and damaged or washed away more than 1,300 homes.

On Saturday, the city will read the names of those who died and reflect on how the flood changed the way the city and others towns across the country built themselves.

'It Was Hell'

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Latin America
2:47 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Mexicans Want New Approach To Bloody Drug War

A Mexican federal policeman guards the area where dozens of bodies, some of them mutilated, were found on a highway outside the northern Mexican city of Monterrey on May 13. The murders were one of the latest episodes in Mexico's brutal and unrelenting drug war.
Christian Palma AP

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 5:59 pm

Second of two parts

Mexicans select a new president on July 1, and they want a leader who can reduce the rampant violence in their country. Warring drug cartels have killed more than 50,000 people in the past 5 1/2 years, while thousands have disappeared and some cities have been turned into lawless zones.

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The Salt
2:30 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Food Truck Cookbook Tracks Best Meals Served On Wheels

The crew of Shindigs sets up shop in a parking lot in Birmingham.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 5:59 pm

With recent news that even Paris has one, food trucks are certainly in vogue these days. In the U.S., they're now spreading from the hot scenes in Los Angeles and New York to smaller cities, like Milwaukee and Madison. Even school systems are jumping on the food truck bandwagon.

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Science
2:10 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Is Japanese Dock A Noah's Ark Or A Trojan Horse?

Among the creatures that survived the trans-Pacific trek aboard the Japanese dock was this sea star, which was found inside the float.
Jessica Miller flickr

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 5:59 pm

A bizarre event has drawn scientists to a beach in Oregon — a floating concrete dock from Japan has washed ashore. It had been ripped from its moorings by last year's tsunami and floated across the Pacific.

The dock is encrusted with mussels, barnacles and other marine life from Asia. Scientists are amazed these organisms survived the 14-month voyage, but they're also worried some of these organisms could become pests in U.S. waters.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Right On The Money: A 'Capital' Book For Our Times

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 5:59 pm

Lizzie Skurnick writes the "That Should Be a Word" column for the New York Times Magazine.

England has always reveled in its drawing-room dramas, from Jane Austen's social minefields to E.M. Forster's Howards End to Upstairs, Downstairs — and yes, the blockbuster Downton Abbey.

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Music Reviews
4:54 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Music Review: 'Can You Canoe'

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

For many kids, summer means no homework, playing outdoors and, of course, traveling. Our children's music reviewer, Stefan Shepherd, tells us about a new album inspired by a trip down America's original interstate highway.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CAN YOU CANOE?")

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It's All Politics
4:54 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

There's More Secret Money In Politics; Justice Kennedy Might Be Surprised

Justice Anthony Kennedy, who wrote the Citizens United opinion saying that corporations can pay for ads expressly promoting or attacking political candidates.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 5:39 pm

Federal election law has required the public disclosure of campaign donors for nearly 40 years.

But this year, outside groups are playing a powerful role in the presidential election. And some of them disclose nothing about their donors. That's despite what the Supreme Court said in its controversial Citizens United ruling two years ago.

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Poetry
4:09 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

New U.S. Poet Laureate: A Southerner To The Core

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 4:54 pm

The United States named its 19th poet laureate today: Natasha Trethewey, a professor of English and creative writing at Emory University in Atlanta. She is the nation's first poet laureate to hail from the South since the initial laureate — Robert Penn Warren — was named by the Library of Congress in 1986.

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Movie Interviews
3:18 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Damon Lindelof Risks The Wrath Of Loyal Fans Again

Damon Lindelof moderated a conversation with Charlize Theron, who stars in the new Ridley Scott thriller Prometheus, at the 2011 Comic-Con. Lindelof co-wrote the film.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 6:35 pm

Damon Lindelof was a producer on the 2009 reboot of Star Trek, which seemed to win over loyal Trekkies. And this weekend Lindelof will earn the devotion — or wrath — of Alien fans. He helped write the screenplay for the new film Prometheus, an origin story for Ridley Scott's 1979 sci-fi classic.

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Latin America
3:11 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Mexico's Once Dominant Party Poised For A Comeback

Mexican presidential front-runner Enrique Pena Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, waves to the crowds during a campaign stop in the northern border city of Tijuana, Mexico, on June 3. The once dominant PRI, out of power for the past 12 years, looks likely to make a comeback.
Alex Cossio AP

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 4:54 pm

First of two parts

As Mexico approaches its election day on July 1, polls indicate the candidate for the opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, is well ahead and appears likely to return his party to power.

The PRI governed Mexico for seven decades until 2000, when it was tossed out by an electorate tired of a corrupt political machine. Now, discontent with the current leadership and the rampant drug-related violence has created an opening for the PRI to come back. Still, some Mexicans are queasy about the prospect of the party's resurgence.

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The Two-Way
12:58 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Drink Up! Idaho OKs 'Five Wives' Vodka

Bottles of Ogden's Own Distillery Five Wives Vodka at a state liquor store in Salt Lake City.
Brian Skoloff AP

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 4:54 pm

The state of Idaho's Liquor Division has changed its mind about Five Wives vodka.

The vodka, which as we said last week had been banned from Idaho's liquor stores because its name and label might offend women and Mormons, is going to be allowed to be sold in the state.

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Asia
12:46 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Bankrupt At Home, Philly Orchestra Looks To China

The Philadelphia Orchestra, which declared bankruptcy last year, has been performing in China, where it is looking to develop new streams of revenue.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 7:17 pm

The Philadelphia Orchestra has just wrapped up a 10-day visit to China, its seventh trip to the country over the past four decades.

But this trip was different.

The orchestra is preparing to come out of bankruptcy, and this tour was about its survival. It hopes to balance its books by building new audiences and new revenues in the world's second-largest economy.

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Health
5:41 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Children Getting CT Scans At Higher Risk For Cancer

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 6:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

New research out today indicates that a popular medical test may increase the risk for some forms of cancer. A large international study found that CAT scans, which are also known as CT scans, can increase the risk for leukemia and brain cancer in children.

NPR's Rob Stein joins us now to talk about the new findings. And, Rob, I understand the concerns about these scans have been building for a long time. So what's the specific source of worry here?

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Election 2012
4:39 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Walker Moves Forward As The Right's Newest 'Hero'

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (center) is greeted by his Cabinet and staff Wednesday at the state Capitol in Madison, a day after defeating Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett in a recall election.
Andy Manis AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 6:29 pm

Republican Gov. Scott Walker triumphantly returned to the Wisconsin Capitol Wednesday, fresh off of his decisive victory in Tuesday's bitter recall election.

The governor appears to be emerging from the tough recall fight stronger, and with his national profile rising.

Read more
Business
4:03 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Good Times For Airlines, So Where Are The Deals?

A Delta Air Lines flight takes off from the Ronald Regan National Airport in Washington, D.C. As the price of oil trickles down, the airline industry is projected to have a historic good year.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 6:29 pm

The rest of the economy may not be doing great, but airlines are expecting a banner year. Profitability is up and fuel prices are declining, but that's not necessarily great news for consumers.

When Robert Herbst, a former pilot and industry consultant for many years, says the skies are blue, it sounds pretty convincing. And from Herbst's projections, this may be a historic year for the airline industry.

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Europe
3:50 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Spain Needs Cash, But Please Don't Call It A Bailout

A Spanish protester bangs on a pot outside the offices of Bankia in Madrid. Spain's banks are hurting and in need of an infusion of capital.
Pablo Blazquez Dominguez Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 6:29 pm

Spain's banks are struggling and the country's leaders are sending mixed signals about whether they can afford to rescue them, or whether they'll need to ask for outside help.

But one thing is clear: Spanish leaders are trying to avoid calling any potential rescue plan a bailout.

Spain's Economy Minister Luis de Guindos dismisses talk of a bailout for Spanish banks.

"We'll make whatever decisions we need in the future," De Guindos told reporters in Brussels. And that won't be for weeks, after audits of Spanish banks, he said.

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NPR Story
3:40 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Netanyahu Promises 300 New Homes In West Bank

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 7:56 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Israel's prime minister has promised to build 300 new homes in the occupied West Bank. The move is meant to appease settlers who are outraged by the defeat of a bill that would've essentially legalized Jewish settlements built on private Palestinian land.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia Navarro was in Jerusalem today where the settler community voiced its discontent with of the bill's failure.

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The Record
3:09 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

George Clinton Fights For His Right To Funk

A contemporary Clinton sans dreadlocks.
William Thoren

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:43 pm

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Election 2012
2:27 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

N.D. Senate Race Could Be Next National Battleground

Democratic Senate candidate Heidi Heitkamp greets a supporter before a town hall meeting in Minot, N.D., on May 3.
Dale Wetzel AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 6:29 pm

Republicans need a net pickup of four seats to win control of the U.S. Senate this November. One opportunity they see is in North Dakota, where longtime Democratic incumbent Kent Conrad has decided not to run for a sixth term.

Republican Rep. Rick Berg is expected to win the GOP nomination in next Tuesday's primary. If he does, he'll face Democrat Heidi Heitkamp.

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Music Reviews
1:44 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Japandroids: One Part Classic Rock, One Part Punk

Japandroids is guitarist Brian King (left) and drummer David Prowse.
Simone Cecchetti

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 11:39 am

The rock band Japandroids is two men, not from Tokyo but from Vancouver, British Columbia — guitarist Brian King and drummer David Prowse. Both of them sang and very often shouted on their 2009 LP Post-Nothing, which received a lot of praise from music blogs. Their second album is out now; it's called Celebration Rock, and I think it's the best rock record I've heard this year.

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The Two-Way
12:24 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Delta CEO Pushes For National Airline Policy That Lets 'Free Market Work'

A traveler walks by a Delta Airlines skycap kiosk at San Francisco International Airport.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 6:29 pm

"Airlines are expecting a banner year," NPR's Yuki Noguchi is due to report on All Things Considered later today.

More planes are flying with full passenger loads, as any frequent flier will tell you. Mergers have helped cut costs. Ticket prices are up. Airlines are charging fees for bags. Fuel costs have eased a bit.

In these relatively good times, what does an airline CEO want?

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Remembrances
11:22 am
Wed June 6, 2012

'Fahrenheit 451' Author Ray Bradbury Dies At 91

Ray Bradbury's career spanned more than 70 years — during which he transported readers to other dimensions with his futuristic and innovative stories. He died Tuesday at age 91.
Lennox McLendon AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:17 pm

Ray Bradbury, author of The Martian Chronicles and Fahrenheit 451, died Tuesday. He was 91. Bradbury was known for his futuristic tales — but he never used a computer, or even drove a car.

Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Ill., in 1920 and grew up during the Great Depression. He said it was a time when people couldn't imagine the future, and his active imagination made him stand out. He once told Fresh Air's Terry Gross about exaggerating basic childhood fears, like monsters at the top of the stairs.

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Politics
6:53 pm
Tue June 5, 2012

Walker, Barrett Await Results In Wis. Recall

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Politics
6:53 pm
Tue June 5, 2012

Wis. Voters Turn Out In Droves For Recall Election

Robert Siegel talks with Don Gonyea and David Schaper about the state's recall election.

All Tech Considered
6:02 pm
Tue June 5, 2012

Apple To Google Maps: We Have Our Own App For That

Apple's late CEO, Steve Jobs, discusses the Google Maps application for the iPhone during the Macworld Convention and Expo in San Francisco in 2008.
Robert Galbraith Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 7:25 pm

There's been speculation for months that Apple will try to elbow Google's popular Maps app aside on the iPhone and unveil its own map app, and some of the best evidence yet comes from Tuesday's Wall Street Journal.

The paper looked into the reasons for the impending switch and the broader implications it would have for the smartphone market.

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