All Things Considered

  • Hosted by Pat Blank, Hosted by Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish

Weekdays at 4 p.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One
 

Every weekday, "All Things Considered" hosts Michele Norris, Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features.

The Latest On The Wildfires In California

Dec 6, 2017

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Where I am standing on an overlook near NPR West, I can see a lot of Los Angeles from here. The city now has four major wildfires burning nearby. Just to describe it, it looks like there's a massive layer of smoke over the city that we can see.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Two women - one white, one black - are vying to be the next mayor of Atlanta. And one of them, Keisha Lance Bottoms, declared victory this morning.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

A chair is just a chair, unless it's designed as a sound-insulated "isolation sphere": a space-age, egg-shaped pod that was created by a French architect in 1971. It's the kind of unique object you can find at this year's Design Miami.

The fair features everything from vintage furniture to contemporary ceramics to handcrafted jewelry — all collectible objects from the 20th and 21st century. Rodman Primack is chief creative officer of the marketplace, where potential buyers can find unique, limited edition pieces and prototypes commissioned by 34 galleries from around the world.

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When you're facing a major life change, it helps to talk to someone who has already been through it. All Things Considered is connecting people on either side of a shared experience, and they're letting us eavesdrop on their conversations in our series Been There.

This summer, everything was going according to plan for Audrey Degraaf and her wife.

Beautiful. Pure. Natural. Medicine at its pinnacle.

Those were the words of Dr. Giuliano Testa this week — the principal investigator of a clinical trial with ten women underway at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas.

He was talking about the birth of a baby boy to a mother who underwent a uterus transplant last year. It's a first in the U.S., but in Sweden, eight babies have been born to mothers with uterus transplants.

Two major network news divisions are addressing problems at the organizations after unrelated incidents. ABC News President James Goldston denounced his own journalists on Monday for a botched story about the federal investigation of President Trump's inner circle. NBC News is facing skepticism from staff as the organization addresses the backlash over the Matt Lauer sexual harassment scandal.

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All eyes were on Justice Anthony Kennedy Tuesday at a riveting Supreme Court argument where the issue was whether a baker may refuse to create a wedding cake for a same-sex couple.

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For reaction to the decision to ban Russia from the Olympics let's bring in Travis Tygart. As CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, he has long argued for a tougher stance on doping. Mr. Tygart, welcome.

Republicans say the tax-cutting overhaul being debated in Congress will jump-start the U.S. economy, leading to a lot more investment and hiring by companies.

But some economists say the tax plans — which would sharply cut corporate and business taxes and eliminate numerous deductions for individuals — come at precisely the wrong time. Lower taxes could also be undercut by Federal Reserve policymakers, who are gradually raising interest rates, they say.

Updated at 8:10 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court will allow the Trump administration to fully enforce its revised ban on allowing entry to the United States by residents of eight countries while legal challenges are heard by a federal appeals court.

Six of the countries — Syria, Libya, Iran, Yemen, Chad and Somalia — are majority-Muslim nations. The other two are North Korea and Venezuela.

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Now a story about people using coding to find a way through political polarization. This is in Brazil, where civic hackathons have become popular. Reporter Catherine Osborn went to a hackathon in Rio de Janeiro.

The Metropolitan Opera has suspended its longtime conductor and former music director, James Levine, following allegations of sexual abuse reported by The New York Post and The New York Times. The three sets of allegations span from the 1960s to the '80s.

In a moment when the country is grappling with issues of sexual misconduct and the abusive treatment of women and girls, a murder case involving a then-teenager who says she was forced into prostitution is back in the national spotlight more than a decade after the key events took place.

A number of A-list celebrities, including Rihanna, LeBron James and Kim Kardashian West, have taken an interest in the case of Cyntoia Brown, a 29-year-old serving a life sentence for the murder of a Nashville man in 2004.

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Earlier this year, the Trump administration rolled back the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, an Obama-era government program that would shield people from deportation if they arrived in the United States as children without the proper documents. The program will end, unless Congress decides to act.

NPR's Moments With 2018 Grammy Nominees

Dec 2, 2017

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

To Alabama - we're in the midst of the scandal surrounding Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore. Alabama's Republican governor, Kay Ivey, has largely ducked out of public view. Kyle Gassiott of Troy Public Radio went looking for her.

My friend Teana Boston is kind of a big deal. She's 16 years old. And she's already been invited to sing "The Star-Spangled Banner" at professional sports games. But recently, she wrote her own remix:

For the land of the free ...

Watching this TV, the news feels like a movie.

How can this be?

But I'm not surprised ... it happens every day, lives are taken away.

One of the largest credit rating agencies in the country is warning U.S. cities and states to prepare for the effects of climate change or risk being downgraded.

For more than a century, corn has been the most widely planted crop in the country and a symbol of small-town America. Think of the musical Oklahoma, where the corn is as tall as an elephant's eye, or the film Field of Dreams, in which old-time baseball players silently emerge from a field of corn.

Even farmers are partial to corn, says Brent Gloy, who grows some himself, on a farm in Nebraska. (He also graduated from the University of Nebraska. You know, the Cornhuskers.)

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Empire State building, pizza and Broadway are just a few things synonymous with New York City — and then there's the rats.

Like many other major metropolitan areas, New York City has a rat problem. But that doesn't mean that all the rats are the same.

The case triggered national headlines last year when Donald Trump used it during his presidential campaign to argue that the country needs tougher immigration laws.

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