All Things Considered on IPR News and News/Studio One

Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block, Pat Blank

Weekdays at 4 p.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One
 

Every weekday, "All Things Considered" hosts Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features.

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U.S.
3:22 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Red Cross For Rover: Inside America's Canine Blood Banks

At Blue Ridge Veterinary Blood Bank in Purcellville, Va., dog holder Diane Garcia snuggles with one-year-old Doberman Leon as phlebotomist Rebecca Pearce taps his jugular vein to start the blood draw. Leon's "mom," Carrie Smalser, feeds him peanut butter, to keep him happily distracted and calm.
Christopher Connelly NPR

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 8:55 pm

America is facing a blood shortage — a shortage of dog blood. Whether Fido tangles with a car and loses, or Barky contracts a blood-damaging disease, dogs — like their people — sometimes need transfusions. And while there's no centralized Red Cross for Rover, there are a few commercial canine blood banks across the country, and many veterinary schools do their own blood banking.

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Ecstatic Voices
3:06 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Life As Prayer: The Singing Nuns Of Ann Arbor

Sister Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz (right), vicaress general and music director for Dominican Sisters of Mary. On the group's new album, she plays organ and composed three selections.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:31 pm

In the cloistered world of classical music recordings, there is great interest in choral music by Catholic nuns these days. In the past year, two separate albums by a group of monastic nuns shot to the top of the classical charts.

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Book Reviews
4:27 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Heading West: The Gritty, Luminous 'Son Of A Gun'

Justin St. Germain teaches at the University of New Mexico.
William Bledsoe

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:17 pm

My parents married young — both were still undergraduates — and so by the time my father started graduate school in mathematics, he and my mother were the harried parents of three small children. They wanted us to see America. And so my father chose the University of Arizona — about as far as you could go from our West Virginia home without falling off the country's opposite edge. On our way, we stopped in Tombstone.

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Education
4:27 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Ala. School District Cancels Bus Service, Igniting Controversy

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel.

For many communities around the country, the yellow school bus is the quintessential sign that school is in session. Well, one school district is taking its buses off the roads. Citing the need to cut costs, district officials in Hoover, Alabama are canceling school bus service starting one year from now.

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Music Reviews
4:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Shine And The Moonbeams: R&B For The Kids

Shawana Kemp, lead singer for Shine and the Moonbeams.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:03 pm

Family music comes in a broad range of styles – folk, rock, punk and even polka. But, compared with its popularity among adults, there have been very few R&B and soul music albums for kids. Enter Shine and the Moonbeams.

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Law
4:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

NYPD's 'Stop-And-Frisk' Deemed Unconstitutional

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:03 pm

A federal judge in New York City ruled that the police department has been violating the civil rights of tens of thousands of minority New Yorkers with its practice of warrantless searches, better known as "stop-and-frisk." It's a rebuke for city officials have defended the tactic as an important crime-fighting tool. Judge Shira Scheindlin is appointing a federal monitor to oversee reforms at the department.

World
4:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Haiti's Cholera Outbreak Tied To Nepalese U.N. Peacekeepers

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:03 pm

More than 100 years after the eradication of cholera in the island nation of Haiti, the disease has reemerged with a vengeance. A new study out of Yale University traces the outbreak back to an infected Nepalese disaster response team, dispatched by the UN in the aftermath of Haiti's massive 2010 earthquake. Robert Siegel speaks with the study supervisor, Muneer Ahmad.

Code Switch
3:26 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Medgar Evers' Son Honors Civil Rights Icon In His Own Way

After Medgar Evers was murdered, his wife, Myrlie Evers, carried on his work. This photo shows Myrlie Evers and her children, Van, 9; Darrell, 16; and Rena, 14, in June 1969 in their Claremont, Calif., home.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:06 pm

James Van Dyke Evers was only 3 when his father, Medgar, was assassinated in the driveway of the family's home in Jackson, Miss., in June 1963.

A sniper shot Medgar Evers in the back as he returned from a meeting late at night. Tensions had been running high because Evers, the first field secretary for the NAACP, was making headway in pushing the state's black citizens to register to vote. White Mississippians who had lived comfortably under segregation could feel the ground shifting beneath them — and they didn't like it.

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Shots - Health News
2:03 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Brains Of Dying Rats Yield Clues About Near-Death Experiences

Could the images common in accounts of near-death experiences be explained by a rush of electrical activity in the brain?
Odina iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 6:57 am

A burst of brain activity just after the heart stops may be the cause of so-called near-death experiences, scientists say.

The insight comes from research involving nine lab rats whose brains were analyzed as they were being euthanized. Researchers discovered what appears to be a momentary increase in electrical activity in the brain associated with consciousness.

Although the experiment relied on animals, the results could apply to humans, too, the researchers say.

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Parallels
10:35 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Italy's First Black Minister Finds Herself A Target Of Slurs

Cecile Kyenge's appointment in April as integration minister was hailed as a landmark for diversity in Italy. But since then, she's been the target of death threats and vicious racial slurs.
Alberto Pizzoli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:31 pm

When Cecile Kyenge became the first black government minister in Italian history, the appointment was hailed as a landmark for diversity. But since Kyenge became integration minister, she has been the target of death threats and vicious racial slurs.

The debate highlights growing intolerance and what Prime Minister Enrico Letta has called a shameful chapter for Italy.

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Environment
4:23 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

The Algae Is Coming, But Its Impact Is Felt Far From Water

Chinese beachgoers walk by an algae-covered public beach in Qingdao, China, in July. The seas off China have been hit by their largest-ever growth of algae, ocean officials say, with waves of green growth washing onto the shores.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 4:49 pm

Algae blooms are green or red or brown, slimy, smelly and you don't want it coming soon to a waterfront near you.

Most of us don't give a lot of thought to algae until the furry-like monstrosity is spreading over beaches, rivers, lakes and bays, but gigantic algae blooms have become an increasing problem around the world.

The danger algae blooms pose is that they sap the body of water where they are growing of nutrients and oxygen; they then die, decompose and rot.

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Music
3:51 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Trumpeters And Troubadours: New And Old Music From Italy

The band Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino is leading the revival of an old Italian folk style called taranta, which has hypnotic rhythms meant to have restorative powers.
Daniela Cardone Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 4:53 pm

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Author Interviews
2:39 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

'Dressing Constitutionally': When Fashion And Laws Collide

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 9:19 am

How short is too short, according to the law? Wardrobe choices, or lack thereof, raise all sorts of issues — from First Amendment concerns to questions of equality, sexuality and control.

Ruthann Robson's new book, Dressing Constitutionally Hierarchy, Sexuality, and Democracy from Our Hairstyles to Our Shoes, examines anecdotes throughout history demonstrating the ways fashion and laws can conflict or influence one another. Robinson talks with Jacki Lyden, host of weekends on All Things Considered, about some of those examples.

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Around the Nation
2:05 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

How A Massive Power Outage Sent People Out In The Street

The New York City skyline is mostly dark in this photo of the 2003 blackout that hit U.S. and Canadian cities.
Frank Franklin II AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 11:38 am

On Aug. 14, 2003, a series of cascading power failures led to a blackout that spread across the Northeast and as far west as Ohio. Some 50 million people were affected, and the power outages lasted up to 31 hours.

New York City was especially hard hit as the skyline went dark, and its 8 million residents coped without traffic lights or subways. We'll be exploring the lessons learned in the week ahead, but reporter Beth Fertig of member station WNYC reminds us what happened in her city.

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Media
4:50 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

The Tricky Business Of Predicting Where Media Will Go Next

On Monday, the Washington Post Co. announced the sale of its newspaper to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, a move that comes as the paper struggles to keep up revenue.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:26 pm

What's next for The Washington Post? With a new owner, the paper is stepping into a new era. Its path may lead to the ever-evolving future of journalism.

"There is no map, and charting a path ahead will not be easy," said Amazon founder Jeff Bezos with the announcement of his purchase Monday. "We will need to invent, which means we will need to experiment."

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Movie Interviews
4:50 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

'Lovelace': A Sex Superstar's Struggle To Show Herself

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:26 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Coming up, we have a remembrance of actress Karen Black who made a name for herself in Hollywood during the 1960s and '70s. First, though, we turn to the silver screen for a look at another actress of the 1970s, Linda Lovelace.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Arts & Life
4:10 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Audio As Art At New York Exhibit

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:26 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF ARPEGGIO)

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Arpeggios ricochet through three speakers and envelop us. We're on the modernist Bauhaus staircase at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, listening to techno-inspired electronica. This piece is part of a new exhibit, "Soundings: A Contemporary Score," that opens today.

BARBARA LONDON: I wanted work that pushed limits, pushed boundaries.

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Technology
4:10 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Technology's Role In Romance Dates To The Telegraph

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:26 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "CATFISH")

NEV: A couple of years ago, I fell in love online. Turns out my crush wasn't who I thought she was. I was heartbroken.

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

The MTV show "Catfish" looks into the anonymous world of online dating. It's a phenomenon in the news this year.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS SHOW)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Straight ahead, navigating the world of online dating. How to avoid getting hooked through a hoax.

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History
4:10 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Florida's Highwaymen Painted Idealized Landscapes In Jim Crow South

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:26 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

In the winter of 2012, I came across a story on a drive through central coastal Florida in the town of Fort Pierce. Route 1 is now dominated by strip malls and fading condos, but the Florida of the 1950s and '60s was a candy-colored Eisenhower, Kennedy space-age dream of flaming red Poinciana trees and untamed beaches.

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Book Reviews
5:59 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Party Like It's 2009: Life And Friendship In The Great Recession

Choire Sicha co-runs the website The Awl. Very Recent History is his first book.
Jonathan Snyder

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 4:23 pm

In Choire Sicha's Very Recent History: An Entirely Factual Account of a Year (c. AD 2009) in a Large City, a voice from our future looks back at events taking place in a "massive" East Coast metropolis, its citizens perpetually gripped with "a quiet panic" while living in a gritty landscape of iron and excess. Throw in a mysterious virus, a rich, blind governor, a sketchy mayor campaigning for a third term, and this novel gets even more curious.

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The Salt
4:45 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Did Tyson Ban Doping Cows With Zilmax To Boost Foreign Sales?

A pen at a feedlot in central Kansas that houses 30,000 cattle. Feedlots are where cattle are "finished" before slaughter, often with the use of growth-promoting drugs like zilpaterol.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 5:36 pm

Tyson Foods Inc. announced this week that it would soon suspend purchases of cattle that had been treated with a controversial drug, citing animal welfare concerns.

But many in the industry wonder if the real reason is the battle for sales in other countries, where certain drugs that make livestock grow faster are banned.

"I really do think this is more of a marketing ploy from Tyson to raise some awareness so they can garner some export business from our overseas export partners," says Dan Norcini, an independent commodities broker.

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Politics
3:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Susan Rice's First Month On The Job Has Been A Doozy

Rice talks with Yousef Al Otaiba, the United Arab Emirates' ambassador to the United States, before the start of a dinner celebrating Ramadan at the White House last month.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 4:45 pm

People have been talking a lot lately about the National Security Agency. But there's another important "NSA" in the federal government — the president's national security adviser.

That person is a sort of funnel — gathering information from the military, the intelligence community, the State Department — and channeling it all to the president.

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Iraq
3:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

July Was Iraq's Deadliest Month In Five Years

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 4:45 pm

Melissa Block talks to Tim Arango, Baghdad bureau chief for The New York Times, about increasing violence in Iraq.

Africa
3:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

As Ramadan Winds Down, Tensions Ramp Up In Egypt

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 4:45 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. In Egypt, the country's Muslims are marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan, celebrating with family and friends. But not everyone is home enjoying the holiday. Tens of thousands of protesters are still in the streets mainly camped out in two locations in Cairo.

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Remembrances
3:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Jack Clement Worked With Some Of Country Music's Best

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 4:45 pm

We remember recording producer Cowboy Jack Clements, who died Thursday in Nashville at the age of 82. In the 1950s, he helped record Elvis, Carl Perkins and Roy Orbison when he worked at Sun Records in Memphis. He also discovered Jerry Lee Lewis and began a life-long friendship with Johnny Cash. Clement later provided the signature sound to one of Cash's biggest hits, "Ring of Fire."

Planet Money
1:42 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

The Raisin Outlaw Of Kerman, Calif.

Raisin farmer Marvin Horne stands in a field of grapevines planted next to his home.
Gary Kazanjian AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 8:39 pm

Meet Marvin Horne, raisin farmer. Horne has been farming raisins on a vineyard in Kerman, Calif., for decades. But a couple of years ago, he did something that made a lot of the other raisin farmers out here in California really angry. So angry that they hired a private investigator to spy on Horne and his wife, Laura. Agents from a detective agency spent hours sitting outside the Hornes' farm recording video of trucks entering and leaving the property.

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Parallels
11:36 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Rome's New Mayor Wants The Monuments Pedestrian Friendly

Tightrope walker Andrea Loreni performs in front of the Coliseum in Rome on Saturday. Rome's new mayor is on a crusade to make the ancient monuments more pedestrian friendly, and the city held an all-night street party as it permanently blocked off part of the main road running past the Coliseum.
Gabriel Bouys AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 8:38 pm

On the first Saturday of August, a funny thing happened to 150,000 people on their way to the Roman Forum.

While a pianist and sax player set the mood, people looked upward and watched anxiously as acrobat Andrea Loreni made his way slowly on a tightrope stretched across Via dei Fori Imperiali, the wide avenue flanking the Forum and leading to the Coliseum.

The acrobat's walk was meant as a metaphor, a bridge reuniting ancient squares.

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Shots - Health News
6:04 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Test

A red blood cell infected with malaria parasites (blue) sits next to normal cells (red).
NIAID Flickr.com

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 10:02 am

A viable, effective vaccine against malaria has long eluded scientists. Results from a preliminary study have ignited hope that a new type of vaccine could change that.

The experimental vaccine offered strong protection against malaria when given at high doses, scientists report Thursday in the journal Science.

The study was extremely small and short-term. And the candidate vaccine still has a long way to go before it could be used in the developing world.

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Politics
4:28 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Can Congress Figure Out How To Rescue The Post Office?

U.S. Postal Service letter carrier Jamesa Euler delivers mail in the rain in Atlanta in February.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 5:56 pm

The U.S. Postal Service lost some $16 billion last year and continues to bleed red ink. Congress has been unable to agree on a rescue plan.

The latest proposal would allow the post office to end Saturday delivery in a year and enable it to ship wine and beer.

The Postal Service's woes are familiar: People don't really send letters anymore, so first-class mail is down, and Congress makes the post office prepay future retiree benefits to the tune of $5.5 billion a year.

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Education
4:20 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Common Core Curriculum Brings Big Shifts To Math Instruction

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 5:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

To big changes now in the classroom. Most states have adopted new math and literacy guidelines for students from kindergarten through 12th grade. They're called the Common Core standards, and they rewrite the rules of what students should know grade by grade. When it comes to math, not only are the standards changing, some of the work kids will be doing and bringing home will actually look different.

To explain, here's NPR's Cory Turner.

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