Sizing up Hillary Clinton and Marco Rubio

Apr 15, 2015

Two more candidates have entered the 2016 race for president. Hillary Clinton announced her candidacy on Sunday in an online video, and Marco Rubio, a one-term senator from Florida, announced his candidacy Monday at a rally in Miami. 

During this River to River program, host Ben Kieffer talks with Iowa Public Radio’s Dean Borg about Clinton’s first campaign stop yesterday in Monticello, Iowa.

In 2007, she had a video as well announcing her intentions to start a campaign, but it was a very different approach. There weren't any other people pictured. It was her sitting on her couch talking about a long list of issues. - Kelly Winfrey

Tim Hagle, political scientist at the University of Iowa and Kelley Winfrey, a lecturer of Communication Studies at the Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics at Iowa State University also join the conversation.

Winfrey has studied Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign and says that things are different for her this time around.

“In 2007, she had a video as well announcing her intentions to start a campaign, but it was a very different approach. There weren’t any other people pictured. It was her sitting on her couch talking about a long list of issues. In this one, we’re starting to see what her theme will be, which is more of a focus on the average American, the middle class and the economy. It went a long way to make her more a little bit more relatable to a lot of different types of Americans.”

Rubio is known for his work on a failed immigration bill from 2013. Hagle says that his personal story, and his stance on immigration could make him an appealing candidate for some voters.

“For a candidate to be successful, you have to try to find a crossover kind of appeal. Some are suggesting that Rubio has that appeal as a tea party candidate who is now seen as drifting into that establishment kind of category, not unlike Scott Walker.”