Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

North Carolina's Outer Banks has been without electricity for days – and that could last for weeks, according to estimates of how long it will take to repair transmission lines that were inadvertently severed by a bridge construction crew.

Pakistan's parliament has selected Shahid Khaqan Abbasi to replace ousted Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, who was dismissed last week on corruption charges.

NPR's Diaa Hadid reports from Islamabad that there were cheers, boos and demands for order in Pakistan's National Assembly as Abbasi was chosen with about two-thirds of the vote.

Updated 8:40 p.m. ET

Venezuelan security agents arrested two key opposition leaders in a midnight raid on their homes, making good on President Nicolas Maduro's promise to crack down on dissent following a vote that gave him broad authoritarian powers.

Tropical Storm Emily, the fifth named system of the Atlantic season, has formed near Tampa. It is expected to move from Florida's Gulf Coast across the state, dumping lots of rain along the way.

Emily, which is not expected to strengthen significantly, is producing sustained winds of 45 mph and is moving east at 9 mph, according to the 11 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center. The system's center was located about 15 miles due west of Tampa and a tropical storm warning has been issued for the coast from an area north of Tampa to south of Fort Myers.

Maybe New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie should just stay away from ballparks and beaches, not to mention bridges.

Attackers in the Afghan capital attempted to storm the Iraqi Embassy on Monday, setting off a bomb before gunmen rushed the compound's gate. The Islamic State has claimed responsibility.

NPR's Diaa Hadid, reporting from Islamabad, says the attack is likely in retaliation for Iraqi security forces routing ISIS fighters from their stronghold in Mosul, Iraq.

"The group is trying to assert itself – through violent attacks – to show its followers that it still has power, despite losing important battles in Iraq and Syria," she says.

President Trump is now faced with a decision on whether to sign into law new sanctions meant to punish Russia for interfering in last year's presidential election, after the Senate overwhelmingly approved the measure Thursday.

The bill, the first major foreign policy legislation to emerge from Congress since the president took office, also includes sanctions on North Korea and Iran. It easily passed the Senate in a 98-2 vote after sailing through the House by a similarly veto-proof 419-3 margin.

President Trump is keeping up relentless pressure on his attorney general, telling reporters "time will tell" whether Jeff Sessions stays or goes.

Six months after Republicans gained control of the White House and both houses of Congress, Democrats have outlined a plan to improve their chances of methodically taking it all back.

They are leaning heavily on a rebranding of their greatest hits — more and better-paying jobs, lowering health care costs and cracking down on the what are seen as the abuses of big business.

An al-Qaida-linked suspect who prosecutors say conspired to murder a Swedish cartoonist has been charged in federal court in Philadelphia, despite the Trump administration's vow that alleged terrorists would be tried in military courts.

Prosecutors say Ali Charaf Damache, 52, an Algerian-born Irish citizen also known as "Black Flag," was allegedly part of an Ireland-based cell that included Colleen R. LaRose, a Pennsylvania woman known as "Jihad Jane." LaRose pled guilty in a U.S. court in 2011 to conspiracy and terrorism-related crimes. She is serving a 10-year sentence.

Harry Obst, who worked as a German interpreter for seven U.S. presidents through Bill Clinton, says he can only remember one who ever dispensed with an interpreter during discussions with a foreign leader: Richard Nixon.

It was a bad idea for lots of reasons, the author of White House Interpreter: The Art of Interpretation tells NPR.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

In addition to a formal meeting between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, earlier this month, the two leaders held a separate, private conversation that has not been previously disclosed, a White House official confirmed on Tuesday.

On July 7, the two leaders held a formal two-hour meeting in which Trump later said that his Russian counterpart had denied any interference in the 2016 election.

A Soviet-born American businessman was the eighth person present at a June 2016 meeting that included President Trump's son, son-in-law, campaign manager and a Russian lawyer who allegedly had promised to provide dirt on Hillary Clinton.

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Hours after a replacement for the Affordable Care Act was all but scuttled by a clutch of Senate Republicans, three lawmakers appear to have doomed Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's Plan B: Repeal the Affordable Care Act without replacing it.

In the age of the Internet, does simply livestreaming a government meeting make it "open to the public"?

That question is at the heart of a slew of lawsuits filed by rights groups who claim that President Trump's voter fraud commission — known officially as the Presidential Commission on Election Integrity but colloquially as the Pence-Kobach Commission — has failed to open its proceedings to the public.

The presidential commission investigating alleged election fraud has released 112 pages of unredacted emails of public comment, raising further privacy concerns amid a legal challenge to the panel's request for sensitive voter data.

Authorities say that a second 20-year-old male has been charged with multiple counts of homicide in connection with the deaths of three of four men who disappeared in rural Pennsylvania last weekend.

Hong Kong's high-court has ruled in favor of expelling four opposition lawmakers from the city's legislature in a case that critics say calls the territory's independence into question.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET

Assailants riding a moped carried out a series of acid attacks in London overnight leaving several people with facial burns, including one victim with what police described as "life-changing" injuries. Authorities announced two arrests in the case.

Metropolitan Police said there were five attacks late Thursday across a large section of east London over about a 90-minute period. The assailants are also suspects in the theft of at least one motorbike, linked to one of the attacks.

According to Reuters:

The American Civil Liberties Union is suing President Trump's vote fraud commission, charging that the body isn't following federal law requiring it to be open to the public. The lawsuit joins a growing number concerning the commission that have been filed by civil liberties groups in recent days.

It also comes as an email was sent by Vice President Mike Pence's office to states telling them to hold off on sending voter data requested last month.

A federal consumer watchdog agency has issued a new rule that will prevent credit card companies and banks from requiring customers to agree to settle disputes by arbitration rather than going to court.

In a statement released Monday, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau explained:

The British government has released a four-minute video advising the public to "run, hide, tell" in case of a terrorist attack.

The short film, which officials compare to an airline safety video, depicts a firearms attack at a hotel and describes what individuals should do to increase their chance of survival.

Ukraine is set to begin talks with NATO about eventual membership in the western alliance – a move that has long raised the ire of Russia.

Petro Poroshenko, Ukraine's president, met with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg in Kiev on Monday.

After their meeting, Poroshenko said he had "clearly stated that we would begin discussion about a membership action plan and our proposals for such a discussion were accepted with pleasure."

If you think you've heard this story before – you have. Friday's announcement that the U.S. and Russia reached an agreement to halt the fighting in Syria isn't exactly new. If you've been paying attention, you've heard it all before – in fact four times before.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, speaking to reporters in Hamburg, Germany, tacitly acknowledged that it was difficult to put a fresh spin on the latest cease-fire deal.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has confirmed that the United States and Russia have agreed to a cease-fire in southwestern Syria.

Tillerson — speaking to the press following a much-anticipated 2 1/2 hour meeting between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin — said the agreement was set to take effect on Sunday. Jordan and Israel are also part of the deal, the Associated Press reports, quoting an unnamed U.S. official.

China's only operational aircraft carrier is making its first port call at Hong Kong – a symbol of Beijing's growing naval prowess that follows recent tensions with U.S. forces in the region.

The Liaoning, which carries a complement of Chinese-built J-15 fighter jets, steamed into Hong Kong harbor in the company of a pair of destroyers on Friday, news agencies reported.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

Smoke and flames rose from the streets of Hamburg for a second day Friday amid the start of the Group of 20 summit of the world's leading economic powers.

Police battled protesters, including some who threw gasoline bombs, set vehicles on fire and tried to storm the convention center where world leaders were meeting. Many other demonstrators were peaceful.

The Associated Press reports that police ordered nearly 1,000 additional officers to add to the 20,000 already reportedly on duty in the northern German city.

If you're one of those rare individuals defined as a "top performer" in your field, you might do well to watch your back. That's according to new research highlighted in Scientific American.

Coworkers of top performers – think Bill Gates or LeBron James, researchers say – pay a "social penalty" for their excellence. Colleagues are more likely to try to damage the reputations of stars and otherwise undermine their efforts.

A German manufacturer of deep freezers has won a trademark battle with Swedish neo-Nazis over the group's name — which the company says is too easily confused with its own.

The extremist group, known as the Nordic Resistance Movement (NRM), or "Nordfront" for short, is too similar to Nordfrost, the firm that claims to be the world's sixth-largest maker of deep freezers.

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