Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Pope Francis, in an address to a joint meeting of Congress, encouraged lawmakers to work together to solve the problems of ordinary Americans and to show compassion for people across the globe who are suffering from war and hunger.

Secretary of State John Kerry is pledging that the United States will significantly increase the number of migrants it accepts over the next two years, ratcheting up to 100,000 annually by 2017.

Two U.S. citizens held in Yemen have been released, according to the White House. Although the names of the individuals were not immediately released by the administration, they are reportedly two businessmen from New Orleans and Michigan.

A spokesman for New Orleans-based logistics company Transoceanic Development said an employee, 45-year-old Scott Darden, was one of them. The other was identified as Sam Farran, 54, a security consultant from Michigan, according to The Washington Post. The Transoceanic spokesman said Darden had been held since March.

At least 13 migrants, including children, were killed when the dinghy they were using to cross the Aegean Sea collided with a ferry off the coast of Turkey. Another 24 refugees were missing after their boat sank off the Greek island of Lesbos.

The first incident occurred near the port of Canakkale on the Turkish coast.

The BBC reports:

"Turkey's coastguard said it had raised the alarm after being told that a commercial vessel and a migrant boat had collided off Canakkale.

Despite George Stephanopoulos' best effort to press Donald Trump on the Republican front-runner's true thoughts about President Obama's birth and religion, the answers came off more as political dodges than the famous straight talk for which the GOP front-runner is famous.

On ABC's This Week today, Stephanopoulos asked Trump: "You've raised these questions so often in the past, why can't you just say definitively yes or no?"

Updated at 11:45 p.m. ET

Thousands of Cubans packed Havana's Revolution Square to celebrate Mass with Pope Francis, history's first Latin American pope, erupting in cheers as the pontiff approached in his open-sided popemobile.

Believers and non-believers waved Cuban and Vatican flags as they thronged the square, overlooked by a huge portrait of Argentine Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara. The pope in his homily steered clear of politics, but focused on the need for Christians and others to help their fellow man.

Update at 12:30 a.m. ET, Sept. 21

Supporters of former Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras' Syriza party cheered and waved flags in the capital after the leftist party won a convincing victory over the conservative New Democracy party in snap elections.

With more than 99 percent of the ballots counted, Syriza had 35.5 percent of the vote, compared to just 28 percent for New Democracy. A Nazi-inspired party, Golden Dawn, trailed with just under 7 percent.

Pro-democracy activists in Bangkok have defied the military government's ban on protests, staging a march through the Thai capital to commemorate the ninth anniversary of a coup against former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra that triggered an era of political instability and resulted in a second army takeover last year.

Updated at 4:35 p.m. ET

Pope Francis arrived in Havana to enthusiastic crowds, beginning a 10-day papal visit first to Cuba and then to the United States, where he will meet with President Obama, address a joint meeting of Congress in Washington and speak before the United Nations General Assembly in New York.

North Korea is getting pressure from its one and only ally, China, to tone down its latest blustery rhetoric and not to conduct a planned space launch or possible nuclear test.

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET

Within a day of becoming the latest focus of Europe's migrant crisis, Croatia has attracted some 20,000 refugees, while hundreds more are starting to trickle into neighboring Slovenia as they make their way toward the northern EU states.

The influx of so many people into the Balkan nation of just over 4 million people has strained relations with Hungary, which closed its border with Serbia earlier this week by stepping up patrols and stringing razor wire, causing desperate refugees to choose alternate crossing points.

Pope Francis arrives in Cuba on Saturday, where he will hold Mass and visit with President Raul Castro ahead of a six-day tour of several U.S. cities, a meeting with President Obama and a speech to a joint meeting of Congress.

Japan's upper house of parliament has approved unprecedented measures that clear the way for the country to deploy troops abroad for the first time since World War II, a move pushed hard by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

The ruling party faced three days of intense debate over the measures to circumvent Japan's post-war pacifist constitution, allowing its Self-Defense Forces (SDF) to operate overseas.

NPR has learned that four Russian attack aircraft have landed in Syria as part of an effort by Moscow to support the regime of Bashar al-Assad against Islamic State militants.

Pentagon Correspondent Tom Bowman says the Sukhoi jets, known by the NATO designation "Flanker" have been deployed at a forward operating base at Latakia, on the Mediterranean coast, along with four attack helicopters and four transport planes. Moscow plans to dispatch more aircraft, Tom says.

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

Taliban militiamen attacked an air force base in northwest Pakistan, killing at least 29 people, including more than a dozen attending Friday prayers at a mosque inside the military compound, but there are reports that the death toll could be higher.

More than 20 students missed a day of classes in rural Virginia after they were suspended for violating their high school's dress code that bans wearing Confederate flag emblems.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

This tweet from American Airlines:

Our original post is here:

American Airlines flights have been temporarily grounded across the country because of an apparent glitch in one of the carrier's computer systems.

CNBC first reported the delays.

Numerous customers tweeted complaints about delays and the airline responded:

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

Army Sgt. Robert "Bowe" Bergdahl appears Thursday before a military hearing at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, to determine whether he will face a full court-martial for allegedly deserting his post in Afghanistan. The soldier was captured by Taliban militiamen and held for five years before being released last year in a prisoner swap arranged by the White House.

The Archbishop of Canterbury has called for a meeting of Anglican leaders early next year to discuss the future of the faith amid a growing split with its African churches over female priests and same-sex relationships.

In a letter to church leaders, Justin Welby also said that it is time to abandon that notion that Anglicans across the world share precisely the same vision.

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

With Hungary sealing its southern border with Serbia, thousands of migrants are turning west instead, pouring into Croatia, making the Balkan nation the latest intermediate stop for a surge of humanity trying to reach the European Union.

By Thursday morning, Croatian police said more than 6,000 people — mainly refugees fleeing the fighting in Syria — had entered that country since the first of them began arriving a day earlier.

Ringo Starr seems to be on a bit of a cleaning binge.

And that can be a chore when you own an estate in London, one in Beverly Hills and another in Monaco.

Updated at 3:35 p.m. ET

Mount Aso — a volcano on Japan's southern main island of Kyushu — has erupted, spewing black smoke and ash more than a mile into the air, the Japanese Meteorological Agency says.

So far, there have been no reports of injuries or damage, but ash fell as far as 2.5 miles from the crater.

Mount Aso, which stands 5,222 feet high, is the country's largest active volcano.

Taliban militiamen have stormed a prison in Afghanistan, freeing more than 350 inmates, nearly half of whom have been deemed especially dangerous. Four policemen were killed in the assault in the country's eastern Ghazni province.

The BBC quotes Ghazni's deputy governor, Mohammad Ali Ahmadi, as saying that one of the militants blew himself up to breach the prison gates, allowing the others to get in and force open cells.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

Here are the latest developments in the ongoing migrant crisis in Europe:

-- Lauren Frayer, reporting for NPR from Hungary's southern border with Serbia, says: "Hundreds of Hungarian police and soldiers have just moved in to make a human chain along the border. Trucks have moved in, Humvees, and they are quickly unfurling a chain-linked fence topped with barbed wire to seal off this border."

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

Kim Davis, the county clerk in Kentucky who was jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, is back to work today — saying she will neither authorize such licenses nor stand in the way of her deputies if they wish to do so.

And, the first couple to apply for a license at the county clerk's office Monday — Shannon Wampler and Carmen Collins — walked out the door with one.

Texas Rep. Michael McCaul, the chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, says he's "concerned" about security for Pope Francis' visit to the U.S. next week after Washington "disrupted" one threat and continues to monitor others.

Asked about the pope's upcoming visit, McCaul, appearing on ABC's This Week, said: "I'm concerned. I was briefed by the Secret Service in a classified setting. The pope is a very — I'm Catholic, by the way — he is a very passionate man. He likes to get out with the people. And with that comes a large security risk."

Boxing champion Floyd Mayweather Jr. has fought his 49th and, he insists, final bout, remaining undefeated at age 38.

Mayweather easily outboxed Andre Berto, winning their welterweight match in a unanimous decision Saturday night at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.

"My career is over. It's official," said Mayweather, who spent 17 years of his 19-year career as a world champion, according to ESPN.

Two weeks after a cease-fire that appears to have held in eastern Ukraine, Germany's foreign minister says the warring sides are "very close" to a broader agreement to remove heavy weapons from the front lines.

Frank-Walter Steinmeier, who met in Berlin with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius and their Ukrainian counterpart, Pavlo Klimkin, said the brief cease-fire had paved the way for moving toward a resolution of the crisis, set in motion by Russia's annexation of Crimea last year and its ongoing support for Ukrainian separatists.

Updated at 3:25 p.m. ET

Israeli police clashed briefly with Palestinians near the religiously sensitive al-Aqsa mosque complex in East Jerusalem, but there were no reports of arrests.

Police said they entered the site to prevent riots after they received reports that protesters planned to "disrupt visits to the area by Jewish worshipers and tourists," The Associated Press reports. The BBC says police reportedly used tear gas and flash-bang grenades as Palestinians threw rocks and fireworks.