Sarah Boden

Reporter

Sarah Boden is a Des Moines-based reporter for Iowa Public Radio. Before coming to Iowa, she was a freelance reporter and producer in Minnesota.

In addition to IPR, Sarah's work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend All Things Considered and WBUR's Here and Now.

Her reporting has won multiple awards, including a regional Edward R. Murrow for her story on a legal challenge to Iowa's felon voting ban.

Sarah's favorite public radio program is On The Media. 

Ways to Connect

Gilad Rom / Flickr

Today we listen back to a conversation from November on Superman, Spiderman, the X-Men, and many other superheroes have been fighting for truth, justice and the American way for decades. Many of the men who created these characters were Jewish and, in his new book, philosopher Harry Brod explores how Jewish culture is reflected in the lives of our favorite superheroes. Then, comic book artist Phil Hester joins the conversation to talk about his work.

Ames Historical Society website

In this archive edition of Talk of Iowa, hear about the legacy of Maria Pearson and her contributions to the Native American repatriation movement. While Pearson was not directly involved with the writing of ​the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act  (NAGPRA), her work in Iowa and around the country was a catalyst for the passage of the law. 

elycefeliz / Flickr

With George Zimmerman recently acquitted of murder in the death Trayvon Martin host Ben Kieffer looks at the role juries play in the U.S. justice system.  What are the origins of the jury and how have juries evolved over the centuries.  Also, what does the recent flourish of media attention aimed at the jurors for the Zimmerman trial reveal and distort about jury duty?

Recidivism

Jul 29, 2013
Emily Woodbury / Iowa Public Radio

Iowa Public Radio concludes it's summer series on Iowa's corrections system with a look at recidivism. Host Ben Kieffer learns why offenders in rural areas may be at a disadvantage when they leave prison, and also, what factors influence an offender's likelihood to return to prison? 

Bart Vermeersch / flickr

Narcissism and envy, fear and panic…what do these pairs have to do with each other? And what can they tell us about human behavior?

Today, we listen back to two conversations from earlier this year. In the first half, host Ben Kieffer learns about new research on where fear originates in the brain. He talks with neuroscientist and psychiatrist Dr. John Wemme, of the University of Iowa.

INHERTIANCE magazine / Flickr

Even though slavery was outlawed almost 150 years ago, people are still imprisoned and exploited daily in the United States.

Human traffickers prey on the vulnerable and isolated. Often these individuals are children or teenagers hoping to escape a difficult home life, but instead are captured by predators who sell them for sex.

Today, we listen back to a conversation from November 2012. Host Ben Kieffer hosts a discussion on the prevalence of and how to stop human trafficking in Iowa and nationwide.

Emily Woodbury / Iowa Public Radio

Nationally the turnover rate for correctional officers is over 15%. Working in a prison is a stressful and dangerous job, but it can also be rewarding.  Today, Clay Masters speaks with a correctional officer from the Mitchellville Correctional Institute for Women joins the program to discuss what its like to work at a prison.

Also, the union AFSCME claims that the Department of Corrections has insufficient staff numbers running the state’s prison and as a result correctional officers are at risk.  Clay Masters looks into the validity of these claims

Photo submitted by outreachprogram.org

Floyd Hammer and Kathy Hamilton of Union Iowa were recently recognized for their work fighting global hunger.  Their work involves getting packaged meals to hungry children in Africa and many other places.  Floyd and Kathy talk with host Ben Kieffer about their work and what is ahead for them.

In the second half of the show, hear from Iowa author John Price about his new memoir "Daddy Long Legs."

Tom Hooyer / Univeristy of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Iowa is defined by fertile soil and gently rolling hills that were created millions of years ago during the Pleistocene epoch, though the forces that created Iowa's landscapes ages ago are still at work today in other parts of the world.  Host Charity Nebbe discusses the power of glaciers with Neal Iverson, an Iowa State University geologist who will spend part of August living and working near a glacier in Iceland.  Geologist Deborah Quade from the

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Bill Hrybyk / Flickr

The national unemployment rate is 7.6% and in Iowa the rate is at 4.6 %. Recent college graduates and seasoned workers alike are working hard to make a living wage. Host Ben Kieffer looks at how Iowans are getting their foot in the door via internships and working as temporary employees. 

marsmettn tallahassee / Flickr

Women who came of age in the 1960s and 1970s had educational opportunities and careers that their mothers and grandmothers never knew, but many barriers still stood in their way.

Emily Woodbury / Iowa Public Radio

Probation, parole, work release and other programs are designed to help offenders live as productive members of the community. Host Charity Nebbe continues Iowa Public Radio’s series exploring corrections in Iowa with a look at community corrections from the perspectives of offenders, parole and probation officers and volunteers.

Flickr

Cupcakes have taken the U.S.

DonTaylor50 / Flickr

The U.S.

The Farm Crisis

Jun 28, 2013
USDA / National Archives and Records Administration

The farm crisis of the 1980s meant high interest rates; it’s estimated that farmland values dropped nearly 60 percent in some areas of the Midwest during the early '80s.  But it was not just an economic disaster.  A new documentary also tries to capture the personal stories. Guest host Ben Stanton talks with the producer of "The Farm Crisis" Laurel Bower Burgmaier.  Later in the show is an update to the flood-related weather outlook for Iowa, and hear about NPR's programing changes now in effect and how they will affect Iowa Public Radio.

Credit MaST Charter Community School / mastcharter / Flickr

Children are very observant… they notice differences in skin colors, hair, clothes, ways of talking...  Host Charity Nebbe discusses how children learn about race and how parents can teach their children about race and ethnicity with Erin Winkler, associate professor of Africology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and Madeleine Rogin, a kindergarten teacher and

Jvstin / Flickr

Why do we have prisons?  Are they for retribution or rehabilitation or protection? Also, what are the strengths and weaknesses of Iowa's corrections system? Sarah McCammon steps in for Ben Kieffer to look at how prisons in Iowa stake up against prisons nationwide. 

iowa_spirit_walker / Flickr

While 2013 has brought plenty of rain for our trees--maybe too much--the affects of last year's drought can still be seen across Iowa's landscape. Today on Talk of Iowa, we learn how to care for trees and other plants weakened by 2012's dry weather.  Horticulturalists Jeff Iles and Richard Jauron join the program.

Todd Elhers / Flickr

As the Farm Bill is debated in the U.S. House of Representatives, host Charity Nebbe digs into the politics of farm policy in a special joint broadcast with KCUR in Kansas City and Harvest Public Media.  What's the future of crop insurance and the Conservation Reserve Program?  What's at stake for farmers large and small?  And also, how will what happens on the farm affect the rest of the country?

Jason A. Howie / Flickr

There are a lot of ways to share information online, so it's not surprising that some people are oversharing. Host Charity Nebbe chats about social media etiquette with Andrew High, assistant professor at the University of Iowa's Department for Communication Studies, and Nathan Wright, founder of the digital media consulting firm Lava Row.

Pengrin

Sunday is Father's Day.  Find out about the Father’s Day Index and hear about the changing role of dads, who are increasingly stay-at home parents. How is that fact affecting families and our stereotypes?  Guest host Ben Stanton gets advice for dads to communicate with kids using handwritten letters.  

Sarah Boden / Iowa Public Radio

The eastern black rhinoceros is an endangered species, but two eastern black rhinos--Ayana and Kiano--are safe and sound at the Blank Park Zoo in Des Moines.  Host Charity Nebbe visits with Ayana, Kiano and the staff of the Blank P

Univeristy of South Wales / Flickr

Over a hundred years ago, searching for fingerprints became routine in crime scene investigation. In the intervening years the tools of forensic investigation have greatly evolved. Host Ben Kieffer speaks to Iowa State University Mechanical Engineer Daniel Attinger about his research for the U.S.

Bernard and Nancy Picchi Collection / The Willa Cather Foundation

When great American novelist Willa Cather died in 1947, her will made it clear that her letters were never to be published.  That moratorium lasted 66 years and now the public is seeing the late author's letters for the first time in "The Selected Letters of Willa Cather."

Dana Meinch

Where can you find community and acceptance if you are gay or lesbian and a deeply believing Christian? That’s the question journalist Jeff Chu asks in his new book "Does Jesus Really Love Me?: A Gay Christian's Pilgrimage in Search of God in America." Host Ben Kieffer speaks with Chu about his year-long,  28-state journey he took across the U.S. in exploration of how different Christian denominations discuss homosexuality and interact with gay and lesbian members of their congregations.

Eric Anderson / flickr

Marine Sgt. Ross Gundlach and a military service dog, a golden lab named Casey, faced more than 150 missions together in Afghanistan, sweeping roads for bombs in the south Helmand Province. Today on River To River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Sgt. Gundlach about his experience and reunification with Casey in Iowa earlier this month. Also, anthropologist Matt Hill of the University of Iowa, on what makes our relationship with dogs so unique.

Flickr / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Midwest Region

They were once more common than white tailed deer, but now bison live only in controlled and managed herds.  Today on Talk of Iowa Charity Nebbe talks about why bison are so captivating as well as the future of bison in North America.

Legend has it that in 1903, for several nights in a row the small town of Van Meter was terrorized by a giant bat-like creature. One-hundred ten years later, Talk of Iowa tries to uncover the truth with author Chad Lewis, a paranormal investigator and co-author of the new book "The Van Meter Visitor: A True and Mysterious Encounter with the Unknown."

Flickr / daniellehelm

Though stalking became a crime in the state of Iowa in 1994, it’s a difficult charge since in many ways stalking is an “invisible" crime.  Upon examining this crime River to River asks, "What should a person do if they're being stalked?" And also, "What drives stalkers to obsessively harass their victims?"

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