Sarah Boden

Reporter

Sarah Boden is a Des Moines-based reporter for Iowa Public Radio. Before coming to Iowa, she was a freelance reporter and producer in Minnesota.

In addition to IPR, Sarah's work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend All Things Considered and WBUR's Here and Now.

Her reporting has won multiple awards, including a regional Edward R. Murrow for her story on a legal challenge to Iowa's felon voting ban.

Sarah's favorite public radio program is On The Media. 

Ways to Connect

Irene2005

How does where someone is born affect how much money they'll earn over a lifetime? What does income inequality indicate about a country's society and basic economic health?

Branko Milanovic tackles these questions as a lead economist in the World Bank's research department, where he works on the topics of income inequality and globalization.

Sarah Boden / Iowa Public Radio

Many Iowans find the common pigeon, or rock dove, a pest and call them "winged rats." However, this bird's brain is deceptively clever.

Ed Wasserman runs the Comparative Cognition Laboratory at the University of Iowa. Wasserman is world renowned for his work in animal intelligence, including proving that pigeons recognize individual human faces.

K.H. Sidey / Adair County Free Press

For 125 years, four generations of the Sidey family have delivered the news of Adair County.  While many small, independently owned papers perished or became parts of large conglomerates the Adair County Free Press persisted.

Alexander Clark House

Knowledge is power and throughout history groups with power have denied it to others by limiting their access to education.  Even in Iowa, always a free state, the barriers to education for African-Americans were high.

Host Charity Nebbe speaks with Richard Breaux of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and Kesho Scott of Grinnell College about the history of African-American students at Iowa's universities and colleges.

chandrika221 / flickr

The drama of mood swings, impulsiveness and bizarre behaviors during adolescence
can take a toll on both teens and their parents. Neuropsychiatrist and bestselling author Dr. Daniel Siegel says that there is a lot of misinformation about this developmental period.

“There are common myths that we all hear about…that are actually not only wrong, they’re misleading and in some ways they’re disempowering.  So by learning the truths you can actually understand things as they actually are and then do something about them.”

Jimmy Emerson / jimmywayne

Residents of Northwood are back in their homes after being asked to evacuate yesterday due to an explosion and fire at the city's municipal airport.  Iowa Public Radio statehouse correspondent Joyce Russell discusses which bills in the legislature might become laws in 2014.  The Blank Park Zoo's Amur tiger has died, and what Iowa City is doing about a recent rash of sexual assaults in taxicabs.  Also, an Olympics update from the Des Moines Register's sports columnist Bryce Miller in Sochi.

Greg Wass

Iowan Sean Strub has lead a distinguished career as a gay rights activist and advocate for people with HIV/AIDS.  He founded POZ Magazine, designed to serve those living with the disease, a community he knows very well since he has been living with HIV since 1980.

Host Ben Kieffer examines several cases before the Iowa Supreme Court this term dealing with a wide breadth of issues including HIV criminalize, solar energy, defamation in campaign ads, and the

Tuukka Koski / Little, Brown and Company

THE MAST BROTHERS' RED WINE BONBONS

A full-bodied red wine works best here, as it won't be overpowered by the dark chocolate.  Try a Criollo-heavy chocolate with notes of dark fruit, like Madagascar.

 GANACHE

  • Heavy cream, 1/2 cup
  • Dark chocolate, 6 ounces, chopped
  • Red wine, 2 ounces (just over 1/3 cup)
  • Unsalted butter, 1 tabled spoon

COATING

  • Dark chocolate, 8 ounces, melted and tempered

Make the Ganache

Tuukka Koski / Little, Brown and Company

Every year for Valentine's Day Americans spend over $1 billion on chocolate. Host Charity Nebbe speaks with some of Iowa's finest chocolatiers from Chocolaterie Stam, Chocolate Storybook, and Our Lady of the Mississippi Abbey.

rwcox123

In last month’s State of the Union address, President Obama said this year he hoped to strengthen and build ladders of opportunity into the middle class. Host Ben Kieffer talks with University of Iowa sociologist Kevin Leicht and John Gallo of the Henry B. Tippie College of Business.

USFWS Mountain Prairie

Every year more wildlife friendly habitat disappears from Iowa and many different species are paying the price.  Host Charity Nebbe discusses the importance of wildlife corridors and roadside prairies with wildlife biologist Jim Pease and Rebecca Kauten, program manager for Integrated Roadside Vegetation Management.  They explain how Iowa's species are suffering due to a lack of connecting habitat as well as both the history of the state's roadside prairies, and the pros and cons of these

Pat Blank

The domestication of dogs started around 30,000 years ago when wolves started to self-select to live on the edges of human society in Eurasian. It wasn’t until about 14,000 years ago that we had the animal of dog as we know it.

daniellehelm

Approximately 11 million Americans suffer from an eating disorder.  These diseases are hard to understand, difficult to treat and often deadly. 

Fredler Brave

Technology, culture and economics writer Nicholas Carr’s most recent book "The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains" was a 2011 Pulitzer Prize nominee. He speaks with host Ben Kieffer about why he doesn't have a smartphone and how the internet is changing our society.

U.S. State Department

Former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell has made a career out of crafting compromise. First in the U.S. Senate, then later brokering peace in Northern Ireland, and finally tackling peace in the Middle East.  Host Ben Kieffer talks with Mitchell about Syria and Iran. He’ll also share his views on what is driving the hyper-partisan atmosphere in Washington.

Lea VanderVelde

In 1857 the Supreme Court ruled in Dred Scott v. Sandford that a slave could not sue for his freedom. Many call this ruling the worst Supreme Court decision of all time. 

LSU Press

Millions of readers were captivated by the relationships between African American maids and the white families they served in the novel, "The Help."

Listen back to host Charity Nebbe's conversation with the authors and some of the people featured in the book, "The Maid Narratives: Black Domestics and White Families in the Jim Crow South," which tells the true stories of people who lived that reality.

Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

A decade ago ethanol was touted as an eco-friendly biofuel that would not only decrease U.S. dependence on foreign oil, but also boost the Midwest's economy. Today however, ethanol’s future is a matter of debate.

The Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed reducing the ethanol mandate for the nation’s fuel supply. Many Iowa and around Midwest believe a reduction to the RFS would be economically devastating. 

Today on River to River, host Ben Kieffer speaks with two guests. First, he sits down with stef shuster, a Ph.D. candidate who specializes in medical sociology and gender. As part of the University of Iowa’s annual MLK Celebration of Human Rights, stef is giving a talk on “Building Positive Care Relationships Between Health Care Workers and Transgender Patients.”

mikek7890 / flickr

In the summer of 1964, the Civil Rights Movement included many people with various backgrounds working together for a cause. University of Iowa Emeritus Professor of History Shelton Stromquist was one who put his life on the line to help the movement in Mississippi.  He joins host Charity Nebbe to talk about his experiences.

Angie Harms

Listen back to Talk of Iowa's conversation on middle childhood. Middle childhood is the time between toddler-hood and the teen years. It’s a point in development when kids transition into a concrete way of thinking that's more categorical and less emotionally volatile.  Host Charity Nebbe talks with an anthropologist, pediatrician and counselor about what's going on inside those growing bodies and minds.

Alexander Gardner / Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

In this encore edition of River to River, listen back to host Ben Kieffer's conversation with Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum director Tom Schwartz.  Schwartz explains the story behind the passage of the 13th Amendment which outlaws slavery and involuntary servitude.

James Carnahan

Shows like America's Got Talent and YouTube videos have introduced us to many phenomenal young singers belting ballads like adult Broadway stars.  However, is it healthy for young performers to sing with such intensity?  How does hitting the high and low notes affect vocal cord development?

Emily Woodbury

The battle surrounding meat and livestock production ranks among the longest-waged and hardest fought in American history. Today on River to River, Ben Kieffer talks with historian and author, Maureen Ogle. Her new book is titled In Meat We Trust.

Angr / Wikipedia

Iowans like to believe they don’t have accents, but in truth everyone has a distinct way of speaking. Host Charity Nebbe discusses regional dialects with linguist Aaron Dinkin and folk historian Tom Morain.  They explain why people in northern Iowa say "I'm bushed" when tired, how language changes over time and what changes are taking place right now.

Space and Dinosaurs

Dec 27, 2013

A listen back to two of the most riveting science conversation of the year  First, astrophysicist and science advocate Neil deGrasse Tyson chats with host Ben Kieffer on capturing asteroids and the future of human space exploration.  Then later, University of Iowa geologist Chris Brochu discusses recent research on the death of the dinosaurs.

whitneyinchicago

Cupcakes have taken the U.S. by storm in the last few years; but cakes, large and small, have always been an important part of our culture.  Host Charity Nebbe discusses family recipes and gourmet innovation with Evelyn Birkby, Iowa’s most famous homemaker and columnist for the Shenandoah Evening Sentinel.

Charity Nebbe

Host Charity Nebbe celebrates acts of kindness by interviewing the people whose lives have been positively affected by others.

Pasi Pitkänen

River to River revisits the important subject of criminal stalking.

Though stalking became a crime in the state of Iowa in 1994, it’s a difficult charge since in many ways stalking is an “invisible" crime.  Often, victims of stalking have a hard time proving they are being terrorized.

Pages