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All Tech Considered
2:01 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

FAA Head: Safety, Privacy Concerns Abound In Regulating Drones

A water-collecting drone hovers at a testing site in Lincoln, Neb., in 2013. The Federal Aviation Administration is working on rules for the commercial use of unmanned aircraft.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 10:13 am

A number of federal agencies are grappling with rules around drones as the popularity of the unmanned aircraft is rising. The National Park Service recently banned their use in Yosemite, and the Federal Aviation Administration is under orders from Congress to safely integrate unmanned aircraft into U.S. airspace by September 2015.

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Around the Nation
5:05 pm
Sun May 4, 2014

Amid Statewide Drought, California Races To Burn Wildfire Fuel

California's intense drought has increased the risk of wildfire, and also made it more difficult for fire crews to safely conduct controlled burns.
Tom Dreisbach NPR

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 5:19 pm

On April 30, the Etiwanda Fire ignited in the San Bernardino National Forest in Southern California, then quickly grew to more than 2,000 acres before crews were able to contain it.

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My Big Break
4:13 pm
Sun May 4, 2014

How To Make Your Idol Hate You, In One Unfunny Comedy Audition

Comedian Kurt Braunohler does not speak German, but that didn't stop him from faking his way to an audition for the film Brüno.
Mandee Johnson

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 10:03 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers. The following is what you might call an "almost big break."

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The Sunday Conversation
4:05 am
Sun May 4, 2014

A Window To Executions: How To Cover Death For A Living

Associated Press reporter Michael Graczyk stands outside Huntsville penitentiary before the execution of confessed killer Elroy Chester.
Pat Sullivan AP

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 12:06 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

As a criminal justice reporter for The Associated Press, Michael Graczyk has covered hundreds of executions of death row inmates in the state of Texas. This means, of course, that he must be there to witness those deaths.

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Economy
5:27 pm
Sat May 3, 2014

Playing Matchmaker To Empty Jobs And Those Seeking Them

Chevron's El Segundo Refinery is just one of many in the Los Angeles area that must stock up on workers during fast turnaround projects.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 8:50 pm

The easiest time to get hired at one of the seven oil refineries in the Los Angeles area is during what's called a turnaround. These breaks, when the refineries are shut down for routine maintenance, are incredibly labor-intensive. And refineries want to get them done as quickly as possible.

So companies need enough people to get the job done. But those workers must have specific skills.

In this line of work, as with other U.S. industries, there's a skills gap.

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Music Interviews
4:18 pm
Sat May 3, 2014

Sonny Rollins: 'You Can't Think And Play At The Same Time'

"Jazz improvisation is supposed to be the highest form of communication," Sonny Rollins says, "and getting that to the people is our job as musicians."
John Abbott Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat May 3, 2014 5:27 pm

When you consider that critics have been writing about him for over 60 years, it can seem as if there's nothing left to say about Sonny Rollins. But there is – because over the decades, the "Saxophone Colossus" has never stopped growing or adding to his sound.

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Race
9:33 am
Sat May 3, 2014

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar On Sterling: 'There's Light Now'

Hall of Famer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar embraces Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson during a news conference on Tuesday after NBA Commissioner Adam Silver banned LA Clippers owner Donald Sterling from basketball for life.
AP

Originally published on Sat May 3, 2014 6:46 pm

Basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar says he believes the entire LA Clippers corporate organization is better off now that owner Donald Sterling has lost his standing with the NBA.

Sterling was banned for life from the NBA last week for racist remarks made on a recording released by TMZ Sports. Abdul-Jabbar says the punishment announced by NBA commissioner Adam Silver is wise and just, and has given the team confidence.

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StoryCorps
2:52 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Leaving A Dark Time Behind To 'Get Through It As A Family'

Frank Tempone with his son Jack at StoryCorps in Chicago.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:38 am

In 2009, Frank Tempone was severely depressed. He had what he calls a midlife crisis, and left his wife and three kids in Massachusetts to live on his own in Chicago.

But after two years apart, Frank came back. The entire family moved to Chicago, and Frank brought his oldest son, Jack, to StoryCorps because he wanted to apologize.

"Do you remember that time?" Frank asks Jack.

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U.S.
2:45 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Cinco De Mayo: Whose Holiday Is It, Anyway?

Members of Dance Academy of Mexico perform during last year's Cinco de Mayo celebrations in Milwaukee.
Rick Wood Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/MCT/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:38 am

Across the country this weekend, Cinco de Mayo will be celebrated with festivals, music, Mexican food and plenty of bar specials.

But south of the border, the holiday merits little more than a parade in the city of Puebla, east of Mexico City. There, in 1862, outgunned Mexican troops defeated an invading French army.

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Television
3:13 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Meanwhile, In Australia: A Bawdier, Riskier 'Rake'

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 8:47 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Now, a note about television from the other side of the earth, Australia.

A couple of months ago, I found myself watching an American show called "Rake." It starred Greg Kinnear as a criminal lawyer in Los Angeles, a man of many vices and more than a little charm.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "RAKE")

BOJANA HARBOUR: (As Mikki) There's no future for us.

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Europe
3:13 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

In Shadow Of Ukraine, A Return To Rivalry Between NATO And Russia

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 7:32 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We have to begin to view Russia no longer as a power but as more of an adversary - those are the words today of Alexander Vershbow, the deputy secretary-general of NATO. We, in this case, means NATO, and few people are as experienced when he is when it comes to the alliance and the Russians. Before becoming the number two man at NATO, he was U.S. ambassador to the alliance and then U.S. ambassador to Russia. And he joins us now. Alexander Vershbow, welcome to the program.

ALEXANDER VERSHBOW: Good to be here.

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Paying For College
2:40 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Is It Still College Without Football?

ImageZoo/Corbis

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 8:02 am

A small number of universities are starting to go against the grain, reducing amenities and frills in favor of keeping the costs relatively low.

Neil Theobald is the president of Temple University, which recently began offering students $4,000 per year in grants — if they promise to limit the number of hours they work during the school year and graduate on time.

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All Tech Considered
3:53 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Twitter CEO Hopes To Attract Users By Clearing The Clutter

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo says the company has to bridge the gap between the brand's global awareness and user engagement.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 1:48 pm

Twitter is growing and its brand is spreading but Wall Street is unimpressed. On Tuesday, the company announced it had doubled its quarterly revenue from a year ago to $250 million. The social networking site also increased its number of active users to 255 million, up 25 percent from a year earlier.

But despite the gains, Wall Street analysts have called the growth tepid. Twitter went public last November, and its shares have traded as high as $74; on Wednesday, it opened at under $38.

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Iraq
3:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

A Quiet Election Day In Iraq, With Some Signs For Concern

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 5:18 pm

For the first time since U.S. troops withdrew in 2011, Iraqis went to the polls to vote on their leaders. As Reuters reporter Ned Parker says, the day's events paint a grim future for Iraq's future.

Sports
3:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

How The NBA Might Ensure Sterling Sells The Clippers

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 5:18 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

A day after NBA commissioner Adam Silver banned Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling for life and made clear his intention to force Sterling to sell the team, the question remains, just how will Silver do that?

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Iraq
3:24 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

One Day From Elections, Iraq Is Racked By Violence

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 6:49 pm

In a town northeast of Baghdad, at least 17 people are dead and dozens wounded after a pair of bombs struck an outdoor market. As Tim Arango of The New York Times explains, it's just the latest deadly attack on the eve of Iraq's national parliamentary elections.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
3:37 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Former Clipper On Sterling: 'He's Always Had A Bully Mentality'

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 5:18 pm

Keyon Dooling, a former Los Angeles Clipper and founder of the Respect Foundation, discusses his time playing for the team under owner Donald Sterling. Sterling has come under fire for racially inflammatory comments he allegedly made.

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All Tech Considered
3:17 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

If We'd Only Known About The Impending Spam

1970s NPR logo.
NPR

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 1:10 pm

The memo arrived on paper.

Because it was 1994.

A notice, to all NPR staff, proclaiming, "Internet is coming to NPR!"

And there was no directive to log on to this fast-growing "organization," by the way. "If you do not want to use Internet," the memo read, "simply do nothing."

You can see more highlights from NPR's pre-Internet days at the Nprchives Tumblr.

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Education
5:34 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Learning With Disabilities: One Effort To Shake Up The Classroom

Samuel Habib, seen here at 3 years old, sits in his supportive corner chair in class. Samuel, who has cerebral palsy, is now 14 and is headed to high school. Dan Habib, Samuel's father, is an advocate for inclusion and made a film about his son called Including Samuel.
Dan Habib/includingsamuel.com

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 8:54 am

This is what an inclusive classroom looks like: Children with disabilities sit next to ones who've been deemed "gifted and talented." The mixing is done carefully, and quietly. Students don't necessarily know who's working at what level.

Despite a court ruling 25 years ago that gave children with disabilities equal access to general education activities, change has been slow.

Today, about 17 percent of students with any disability spend all or most of their days segregated. Children with severe disabilities can still expect that separation.

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Science
4:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Astronaut Twins To Separate For The Sake Of Space Travel

Mark Kelly (left) will stay on Earth while his brother, Scott Kelly, spends a year on the International Space Station. NASA will test how the environments affect them differently.
NBC NewsWire NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:23 pm

This month, NASA revealed new details of the plan to send humans to Mars by 2030. It's an elaborate and expensive mission, involving a giant deep-space rocket, and roping an asteroid into the moon's orbit to use as a stepping stone to Mars.

But there are still some serious questions about a manned expedition to Mars. Namely, is it safe? That's where astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly come in. The Kelly brothers are identical twins, and the only siblings ever to both fly in space.

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Interviews
9:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

The Risk And Reward Of Monitoring Elections In The Middle East

Election officials count ballots under the scrutiny of monitors in Iraq in 2005. Les Campbell from the National Democratic Institute worked as an election monitor during Iraq's 2005 elections, a job that came with a flak jacket and security detail.
Sasa Kralj AP

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Iraq is suffering the worst spate of violence in many years — some say the worst since the height of the U.S. war in 2008. On Friday, dozens of people were killed at an election rally in Baghdad. This Wednesday, Iraqis will go to the polls in the first parliamentary election since the U.S. pulled combat troops out in 2011.

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Music Interviews
5:25 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

René Marie On Singing, Sex And The Importance Of Being Eartha

Jazz singer René Marie's latest release is I Wanna Be Evil: With Love to Eartha Kitt.
Janice Yim Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 12:54 pm

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Author Interviews
4:29 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

How An Army Officer And Diplomat Wrote His Way Through Trauma

Ron Capps talks with refugees in the Kisna Reka refugee camp some 15 miles from Pristina, Kosovo, in 1998. In his role as a U.S. diplomatic monitor, Capps traveled through Kosovo gathering intelligence from refugees and Serb forces about the situation in the region.
Santiago Lyon AP

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 5:25 pm

In five wars over 10 years, Ron Capps shifted back and forth between being a U.S. Army officer and a State Department foreign service officer in some of the world's deadliest places.

In Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere, he served as a senior military intelligence officer. In wartime Kosovo, Darfur and Rwanda, he worked as a diplomat out in the field, documenting violence and war. As he writes in his new memoir, all the while he was almost daily "in the midst of murder, rape, the burning of villages, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ethnic cleaning or genocide."

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All Tech Considered
9:04 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Stopping Link Rot: Aiming To End A Virtual Epidemic

An 404 message appears when the linked page has been moved or deleted.
Devon Yu iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 10:30 am

Just about anyone who's gone online has encountered the message: "Error 404" or page "Not Found." It's what you see when a link is broken or dead — when the resource is no longer available.

It happens all across the Internet, on blogs, news websites, even links cited in decisions by the Supreme Court. It's called link rot, and it spreads over time as more pages die.

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Author Interviews
8:28 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Justice Stevens: Six Little Ways To Change The Constitution

In a new book, former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens says we should rewrite the Second Amendment, abolish the death penalty and restrict political campaign spending.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 10:30 am

Just a few words can hold a world of meaning. John Paul Stevens, the retired Supreme Court justice, has written a short new book in which he proposes a few words here and there that would create some sweeping changes.

The book, Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution, details the half-dozen ways Stevens thinks the Constitution could be improved, changes that he says are worth the trouble of the arduous amendment process.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:14 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Valentina Lisitsa: Chasing Pianos And YouTube Fans

Valentina Lisitsa's new album, Chasing Pianos, features music from Michael Nyman's score to the 1993 film The Piano.
Alexei Kuznetsoff Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 6:15 pm

Born in Kiev a little more than 40 years ago, Valentina Lisitsa came to America in the early '90s to work as a concert pianist.

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Health
3:15 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Despite Popularity, Mysteries Of E-Cigarettes Persist

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 6:17 pm

E-cigarettes are not new, but there is still much that's unknown about them. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, explains the latest research on e-cigarettes and offers his take on new regulations proposed by the Food and Drug Administration.

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Shots - Health News
2:38 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Why Bill Gates Fights Diseases Abroad, Not At Home

By ensuring vaccines are invented and distributed, Bill Gates says, his foundation is dramatically reducing the number of childhood deaths in poor countries.
Marie McGrory NPR

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 12:18 pm

This week in Seattle, Bill and Melinda Gates are attending a meeting of the minds.

Five hundred of the world's top innovators in global health have gathered for the Global Health Product Development Forum, an annual event in which scientists, engineers, policymakers and activists work to develop new tools for fighting diseases.

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Paying For College
2:37 am
Thu April 24, 2014

When Money Trumps Need In College Admissions

For many low-income students, economic trends are making the prospect of getting into the college of their choice, and reaching graduation, even more difficult.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 11:51 am

At some schools, the admissions process itself can work against low-income students, according to Georgia Nugent, former president of Kenyon College and a senior fellow at the Council of Independent Colleges.

Nugent says during her tenure at Kenyon, there were low-income students at the bottom of the admissions list who sometimes weren't accepted so the school could make room for more affluent students.

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The Salt
5:42 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy

President Obama shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe before a private dinner at Sukiyabashi Jiro in Tokyo on Wednesday. At Sukiyabashi Jiro, people pay a minimum of $300 for 20 pieces of sushi chosen by the patron, Jiro Ono.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 10:06 pm

President Obama kicked off the first leg of his tour of Asia on Wednesday with some sushi diplomacy.

He dined with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at a revered and tiny temple of sushi in Tokyo called Sukiyabashi Jiro. The subterranean restaurant, with just 10 seats at the counter, was made famous by the 2011 documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi.

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