Lindsey Moon

Talk Show Producer

Lindsey Moon started as a talk show producer with Iowa Public Radio in May of 2014. She comes to IPR by way of Illinois Public Media, an NPR/PBS dual licensee in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, and Wisconsin Public Radio where she’s worked as a producer and a general assignment reporter.

Lindsey is an Iowa native and a 2012 graduate of the University of Iowa with degrees in Anthropology and Journalism. Her work has earned awards from the Wisconsin Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated and the Northwest Broadcast News Association and has aired on NPR’s All Things Considered.

In her free time, she’s a bookworm, and enjoys running half marathons, seeing live music and scuba diving whenever there’s time and money to plan a trip. Lindsey’s favorite public radio programs are Wait, Wait… Don’t Tell Me! and Talk of Iowa

Ways to Connect

McGhiever / Wikimedia Commons

Here in Iowa, we know all too well about what happens when a major local employer leaves a community. That is what happened in Crosby, Minnesota in the early ‘80’s. In 1982, the mining industry left the area, took most of the jobs, and some felt, the future with it.

Aaron Hautala is president of the Cuyuna Lakes Mountain Bike Crew. He has been a driving force behind an effort to rebrand the area and the community.

“When the mines were closing, mountain bikes hadn’t been invented yet. The industry was still that fresh,” says Hautala.

Fairfax County / Flickr

We’ve been seeing a lot of stories about the incoming deluge of ticks this season. Iowa State University Extension Entomologist Donald Lewis says despite some of that reporting, “nobody should panic.”

“There is no census of ticks. There is no systematic survey. What we have are people’s memories of how good it was last year or how bad it was last year, or how good or bad it was 10 years ago,” says Lewis.

Carl Wycoff / Flickr

Cayson Irlbeck is 10-years-old, and until a few months ago, he'd never seen the green of the grass or the red of a stop sign. That all changed one afternoon when his parents surprised him with a pair of Enchroma glasses, which allow some people who are red-green colorblind to see in full color. He says it's been life changing for him. 

"Stoplights. Stop signs. The grass," he says. "My dad will wake me up really early, and I'll see the purple and orange in the sunrise. The sunsets are awesome too." 

Susan Young/Flickr

When a tree dies or is damaged, our first instinct is to cut it down, but there are many reasons to reconsider. There are birds, mammals and many other species of wildlife who make their homes in fallen trees and holes in the ground. 

Wikimedia Commons

Iowa has been through a lot of change in the last 40 years. The farm crisis set off a chain reaction that continues to impact rural Iowa today. While some rural areas are doing well, others are still struggling and trying to cope with ever dwindling populations. 

Public Gardens are "Hidden Gems"

May 12, 2017
Jason Mrachina / flickr

The Friday before Mother’s Day has been named National Public Gardens Day, which creates a wonderful opportunity to visit and celebrate the many public gardens in Iowa. Public parks like the Dubuque Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, Reiman Gardens in Ames, and the Bickelhaupt Arboretum in Clinton are just some of many across the state. Assistant Director of Reiman Gardens, Aaron Steil, says that what sets these organizations apart from private counterparts is their dedication to educating the public about beautification and conservation of plant ecosystems.  

Pat Blank/IPR

There are lots of resources about co-parenting after a divorce, splitting your finances…. maintaining a civil relationship with your ex… but what about you? During this hour of Talk of Iowa – a conversation about your life after a divorce. Host Charity Nebbe talks with Cat Cantrill, who owns Vitality Vertical Fitness in Cedar Rapids, runs an online empowerment program called Secret Wardrobe and found a whole new identity after her marriage ended.

What is time? Why does it always seem to move forward? Why is the earth made of matter and not of anti-matter? Are there really just three dimensions? Are we alone in the Universe? How big is the Universe? 

The short answer is, "we have no idea," and that's the point of a new book by Jorge Cham and Daniel Whiteson. During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Cham and Whiteson about their new book We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe. 

Night Owl? It's In Your Genes.

May 8, 2017
Ed Yourdon / Flickr

Deep sleep is something that is more and more important as we age. New research shows that it's an important part of keeping a healthy memory, and that listening to pink noise might help in that process.

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Dr. Eric Dyken, a neurologist and director of the University of Iowa's Sleep Disorder Center. 

In addition to talking about pink noise, Dr. Dyken also talks about new research showing there is actually a gene that could determine whether you're an early riser or a night owl. 

Johnathon Choate / UI College of Public Health

After a spike in gun violence in Cedar Rapids and Des Moines over the last few years, the state of Iowa is moving towards approaching violence as a public health issue, following the example of cities like Baltimore.

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Dr. Leana Wen, health commissioner for the city of Baltimore, who has been approaching Baltimore's issues with poverty, gun violence, and addiction as public health issues, rather than criminal justice problems. 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Since 2013, gonorrhea infections have risen 75% in Iowa. To explore why that is the case, in this River to River interview, host Ben Kieffer talks with George Walton, STD Program Manager for the Bureau of HIV, STD, and Hepatitis for the Iowa Department of Public Health and Emily Wentzell, who is an anthropology professor at the University of Iowa. 

Walton says the reason for the increase include increased testing and encouragement of providers to test patients for infection at multiple places on the body. 

The Federal Communications Commission last week revealed a plan that would roll back net Obama era neutrality rules. These are the rules that make it illegal for internet service providers to slow down or speed up your access to a certain website. During this River to River conversation, host Ben Kieffer talks with FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai about net neutrality and the role of the FCC in a changing media landscape. 

Pai says the rule change is necessary to encourage internet service providers to expand access to rural areas. 

Planting Wildflowers in Iowa

Apr 28, 2017
Brett Whaley / Flickr

The end of April is a great time to explore nature and see wildflowers in bloom across Iowa. The beauty of these flowers is fleeting as they bloom and wilt all before the trees have fully expanded their leaves. Having adapted to their woodland environment, wildflowers maximize their photosynthesis time before the woods become a shady environment for the summer months. Iowa State University extension horticulturist, Cindy Haynes, says that woodland phlox, shooting star, and wild columbine are a few wildflower varieties that have still yet to bloom.

For 10 years, Iowa State University's non-partisan campaign training program "Ready to Run" has prepared women to be first time candidates. This year, they have had record enrollment in the workshops.

Kelly Winfrey is coordinator for Research and Outreach for the Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics at Iowa State University. She says women are far less likely to run for office than males, but at recent Ready to Run workshops, they have had record numbers of women interested in running for local and county offices.

Fredrik Rubensson / Flickr

In 1964, just weeks away from graduating from Grinnell College, Dennis Maulsby decided his best option after college would be to voluntarily enter the military. After returning from the Vietnam War almost five years later, he channeled his war experiences into various creative outlets, ultimately pursuing writing poetry. He self-published his first book, Remembering Willy, and All the Others, and received silver medal awards from veterans associations. His latest book, Free Fire Zone is a collection of short military stories.

Plan Ahead for Your Future Trees

Apr 21, 2017
amdougherty / flickr

Cool temperatures, plentiful moisture, and a long growing season make spring the best time to plant trees. On this Horticulture Day, DNR District Forester Mark Vitosh gives advice on tree selection, site selection, and tree care.

Vitosh places a large emphasis on planning ahead in order to ensure that your planting is most effective. Looking at conditions such as required sunlight, drainage, and the overall space the tree could potentially take up are all key in the planning stage.

 

Rebecca Stanek / flickr

Before the Americans with Disabilities Act, families who had a child with special needs were often told to send their children to an institution, or that there was no hope. Two Iowa educators have just released a free, online book about the history of special education in Iowa.

During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with two former school psychologists, Jeff Grimes and Jim Stumme.

John Pemble / IPR

According to Dr. David Soll, who is Carver Professor of Biological Science at the University of Iowa, there's renewed hope for scientists to find a so-called "magic bullet" when it comes to looking for a cure for cancer. In a study published last week, he's documented the process by which cancer cells join together to form a tumor in 3-D. He modeled the way melanoma cells come together. 

Growing Asparagus is Worth the Wait

Apr 14, 2017
Rob Ireton / flickr

A patch of asparagus can be a great addition to your vegetable garden as they can live up to 30 years. But without immediate visible results, the process can seem discouraging to some. Professor of Horticulture at Iowa State University and Extension Commercial Vegetable Specialist, Ajay Nair, says that waiting the 3-4 years prior to a full harvest is worth the wait.

He offers instructions for planting your young asparagus plant, generally referred to as a crown.

D Sharon Pruitt / Flickr

According to professor of psychology, Marianne Lafrance, our hair plays a bigger role in our lives than we might think. She says there is a psychological impact of having a bad hair day. 

In her research, Lafrance found that a majority of people are inclined to have lower self-esteem on bad hair days.

United Nations Photo / Flickr

President Donald Trump has called the United Nations "just a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time," and he's calling for major UN budget cuts. The United Nations does much more than host meetings, and there are local organizations across the country meant to support and educate the public about its endeavors. 

During the second half of this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Iowa's United Nations Association executive director Andrea Cohen about the UN's role globally and locally to promote international cooperation and peace. 

Michael M. Huang/Studio Reserved

In Iowa there are hundreds of old schools, post offices, and churches that sit vacant. Some of them have been given new life as apartments, or as makers spaces and hubs for creativity. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Michael Wagler of Main Street Iowa. We also check in with several Iowans who have been working to reimagine these old buildings. 

Need a New Podcast to Binge? Try IPR's "Lit City"

Apr 7, 2017

The tenth and final episode of the first season of Lit City, Iowa Public Radio’s new book podcast, goes live next Thursday, April 13th. Co-hosted by IPR's Charity Nebbe and UI English Ph.D. student Anna Williams, Lit City revisits author interviews from Talk of Iowa while also exploring the sights and sounds of the United States’ only UNESCO City of Literature – Iowa City.

wellmark building
Tony Webster / flickr

This week, two of the four health insurers in the state that sell individual health insurance plans on the Affordable Care Act state health exchange, Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield and Aetna, have announced they will no longer offer those individual plans. 

The University of Iowa's Public Policy Center's Pete Damiano says that while the exchanges are only a small part of ACA as a whole, this leaves only two insurers, one of which only sells plans to Iowans living in Allamakee, Clayton, Fayette, Howard and Winneshiek counties. 

Springtime Care for Your Lawn

Apr 7, 2017
Bruce Aldridge / flickr

As April showers kickoff spring weather across the state, flowers are beginning to bloom and grasses are starting to grow. Iowa State University Extension turfgrass specialist, Adam Thoms, shares some advice for how to establish and maintain healthy lawns.

Thoms advises that the next week is a good time to begin the pre-emergence weed control process.

 

Former Ambassador Stephen Rapp served as United States Ambassador-at-Large for Global Criminal Justice from 2009-2015. During his time in that role, he led a prosecution team to win the first convictions in history for sexual slavery and for the recruitment of child soldiers. 

Following possible sarin gas attacks in Syria earlier this week, he says a investigation is likely into Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime. 

Iowa City native Bridget Kearney, most known for her work as bassist for the band Lake Street Dive, is out with her debut solo album “Won’t Let You Down.” During this Talk of Iowa interview, she talks with host Charity Nebbe about her approach to songwriting, and the new music videos she created for this album. 

"Whenever I had time off from Lake Street Dive, I was really excited to be in the studio," she says. "It was a great way to keep engaging that side of my brain and to stay excited about music and songs." 

On March 14th, 1889 Susan La Flesche became the first Native American to receive her medical degree. Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Joe Starita has written about the life and legacy of Dr. La Flesche in his new book  A Warrior of the People.

CGehlen / Flickr

The nation is battling a heroin and painkiller abuse problem. While Iowa’s fight has been less severe than some other states around the US, according to the Department of Public Health, opioid related emergency room visits in Iowa have more than doubled in the last decade.

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Lori Peter, who lost her son Kelly to a heroin overdose in 2015.

Beneficial Insects for Your Garden

Mar 31, 2017
Silk Knoll / flickr

While pollinators are lauded as the most beneficial insect to have in your garden, there are other insects that you also want around. Iowa State University Extension Entomologist Donald Lewis explains the various roles insects play in our landscape.

Lewis explains that the insects which we might perceive as a danger or a nuisance, such as wasps or bald-faced hornets, actually provide a needed service.

 

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