Lindsey Moon

Talk Show Producer

Lindsey Moon started as a talk show producer with Iowa Public Radio in May of 2014. She comes to IPR by way of Illinois Public Media, an NPR/PBS dual licensee in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, and Wisconsin Public Radio where she’s worked as a producer and a general assignment reporter.

Lindsey is an Iowa native and a 2012 graduate of the University of Iowa with degrees in Anthropology and Journalism. Her work has earned awards from the Wisconsin Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated and the Northwest Broadcast News Association and has aired on NPR’s All Things Considered.

In her free time, she’s a bookworm, and enjoys running half marathons, seeing live music and scuba diving whenever there’s time and money to plan a trip. Lindsey’s favorite public radio programs are Wait, Wait… Don’t Tell Me! and Talk of Iowa

Ways to Connect

Author Sarah Miller remembers first reading the Little House on the Prairie books when she was in 4th grade. She says when she went back to reread them as an adult, she saw there was more going on than she picked up on as a young adult. 

"I thought about Ma. I read a scene where Laura wakes up and Ma is sitting by the window and has a pistol in her lap," she says. "If you're the lady in the rocking chair, it's your job to make everything safe and cozy. And you don't know if it's all going to work out that way."

Image courtesy of Squirrel Cage Jail of Pottawattamie County, Iowa

In 1885, residents of Council Bluffs wanted the city to become a safer community, but did not want to pay more taxes to do so. As a result of this, the Squirrel Cage Jail was implemented, composed of 90,000 pounds of metal standing three stories tall. The design of the jail was a cost-efficient rotary design, where the prisoners were housed in pie-shaped cells that were rotated with a crank and centered around one opening, similar to the design of a "lazy Susan." This design meant that only one jailor was necessary to man each of the three structures, each housing over 90 prisoners.

John Pemble / Iowa Public Radio

Between tragedy within the foster care system that has left two teenagers dead due to starvation, and a highly controversial shift from state management of the Medicaid system to a privately managed care system, Iowa's Department of Human Services has been in the news a lot this year.

Des Moines attorney and new DHS Director Jerry Foxhoven took over for former Director Charles Palmer in mid-June. During this River to River conversation, he talks with host Ben Kieffer.

On the transition to managed care: 

Photo Courtesy of Dan Manatt

This past weekend, the former Iowa State Penitentiary opened for tours to the public. Over its 177 years of operation, the prison has developed a storied history in conjunction with the Iowa legal system, including hosting a number of hangings, allowing inmates to have cameras in an attempt to promote transparency, and delicately balancing the treatment of prisoners to promote punishment without treating them inhumanely.

Charity Nebbe / Iowa Public Radio

Iowa brands itself as a place to grow, and it is, though sometimes that growth isn't always positive. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with a handful of Iowans about the biggest problems Iowa faces as a state and what's being done to solve them. 

Downspec / Wikimedia Commons

The head of a mental health crisis center in southern Iowa says she expects it to close at the end of the month due to a lack of funding.

Jackie Sharp is executive director of Oak Place in Centerville. She says after a grant ran out, the regional mental health authority refused to fill that funding gap, and the state hasn’t set up rules that would allow Oak Place to bill Medicaid for services. 

"I don't put a lot of faith in us continuing after October 31. I think my alternate plan is to take care of the graduates that we've had and help my staff transition," she says. 

Abagnale & Associates/WIkimedia Commons

In his late teens and early 20s, Frank Abagnale cashed $2.5 million in fraudulent checks in every state and in 26 foreign countries. Today, he consults with the U.S. government on identity theft and fraud prevention. 

"I've worked with the FBI for 41 years now. I've taught at the academy for 41 years now. I've worked for some of the biggest corporations in the world, and I think I've come a long way since that 16 year old boy," Abagnale says. 

Photo courtesy of Brent Merrick

On Saturday, September 9, Jaden Merrick ran the Park to Park half marathon in Cedar Falls in a total time of 1:30:41 seconds. On Sunday, September 17, he ran a 10 mile run in Des Moines in a total time of 1:11:24. Those times are impressive. What's even more impressive is that Merrick is 9 years old, and both races were world record setting runs. 

"It went great. Yeah, it took quite a bit of training," he says. 

In 2014, Merrick set a world record for the fastest 5K by a 6 year old. In 2015, he set another world record for fastest half marathon by a 7 year old. 

This hour of River to River was recorded before a live audience at the Scottish Rite Masonic Temple in Cedar Rapids. 

Columnists Lynda Waddington and Todd Dorman, as well as political reporter James Lynch and Erin Jordan of The Gazette, join host Ben Kieffer to discuss President Trump and the leader of North Korea, the Republican’s latest bill to overhaul Obamacare, and the value of town hall meetings in 2017. 

Laura Beth McConahie / Flickr

This show originally aired on March 4, 2016.

Psychotherapist Jeanne Safer found the roots of her 1996 book, Beyond Motherhood: Choosing a Life Without Children, in her own life.

“I became interested because I had to be interested. I really was struggling myself to make this decision. It took me five years to do it. I really worried about it, I thought about it, I didn’t talk to many people about it because I didn’t really know anybody who was going through it.”

Joyce Russell/IPR

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Sara Mitchell, F. Wendell Miller Professor of political science at the University of Iowa, and Jim McCormick, a professor at Iowa State University, about President Trump's speech yesterday to the United Nations and the debate over the health care in the Senate. 

"Trump's doctrine is America first," says Mitchell. "His other doctrine is anything but Obama, and you see him moving away from anything that was worked on by Obama." 

You may have noticed during this pledge drive that we had some new music beds that we used as we were taking a minute to talk about how wonderful it feels to support Iowa Public Radio financially. If you heard any of those and thought, "huh, I like that, wonder what song it is," we've got your back. 

Martin St-Amant / Wikimedia Commons

For her newest book, author and traveler Lori Erickson went in search of places where she felt something special. In her new memoir, she visits holy sites all over the world and says that Holy Rover: Journeys in Search of Mystery, Miracles, and God is similar to what "St. Augustine might have written if he was born a Lutheran in Iowa."

During this hour of Talk of Iowa, she talks with Charity Nebbe about her travels.

http://www.mattkuhns.com

The Iowa and Iowa State football rivalry as we know it today only dates back to 1977, but even during the years when the Cyclones never played the Hawkeyes, there was a rivalry between the two schools. And the sports rivalry may pale in comparison to a conflict when Virgil Hancher was the president of the University of Iowa and James Hilton was the President of Iowa State University.  Matt Kuhns has written about those years in the new book Hancher vs. Hilton: Iowa’s Rival University Presidents.

Brian Borland knew that his dad was a phenomenal basketball player as he was growing up. What he didn't know was that his mom, Carolyn Nicholson, was an Iowa high school basketball superstar. 

"I was at my parents condo in 2006, and I heard them talking about going back to Des Moines for the 50th anniversary of Maynard winning the state championship in 1956. And I was like 'what state championship?'" he explains. "She said, 'well me and your aunt Glenda played basketball and we won a state championship when we were younger. Do you want to come with me?'"

Photo Courtesy of Amber Causey

Amber Causey is a distinguished Army veteran with a master's degree in criminal justice and she is a mother. She's competing for Ms. Veteran America 2017 in October and is hoping to go to law school. She's also a survivor of human trafficking. 

She says after her mom was incarcerated when she was 13, a lot about her life changed. She moved in with her dad, who was abusive, and ended up running away from home and dropping out of high school. 

The city of Des Moines could set a record for the number of homicides this year. Sergeant Paul Parizek with the Des Moines Police Department says if another homicide happens, it will be the most the city has seen in over a decade.

“Right now we are at 21, and in 2015, that was the mark we hit for the whole year, and that was the highest we’d hit since 1995. So, with so much time remaining in the year, there’s a very real possibility we’ll hit that,” says Parizek.

“We’ve had as low as 5 in a year. We tend to hover around the 7, 8, 9 range.”

FaceMePLS / Flickr

There's been some new and alarming research about the increasing number of suicides and cases of depression among teens. Are cell phones and social media contributing to the problem? During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Jean Twenge, who is author of the forthcoming book IGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood. 

MilitaryHealth

Nationally, more people between the ages of 15-24 are shot than any other age group. Dr. Denville Myrie, a trauma surgeon at Mercy Medical Center, says that’s true for the ER he works for in Des Moines. 

"These are young, healthy men," Myrie says. "They should not be dying. They are dying from basically stupidity; for no reason. There are so many guns on the street, and it seems like nobody cares what they can do about that." 

Kate Ter Haar

Is your sidewalk a hazard? Has your driveway seen better days? Cracks in concrete happen over time, and they're sometimes difficult to troubleshoot, especially if the problem is due to a tree root or uneven ground. 

During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with home improvement expert Bill McAnally about concrete, asphalt and other paving solutions for your driveway, sidewalk, patio or paving project. 

Clay Masters / IPR

Iowa farmers are making land use decisions aimed at helping farm chemical runoff curb into streams, rivers and, ultimately, the Gulf of Mexico. This year’s dead zone in Gulf is the biggest one ever, and Iowa’s secretary of agriculture says more changes are needed. Bill Northey says cover crops, which keep roots in the ground and prevent nutrients and soil from washing away, are a key practice. But he says statewide only about three to four percent of farmland gets a cover crop. 

Courtesy of Luke Tweedy

Eastern Iowa music lovers, take note. Luke Tweedy and his team at Flat Black Studios are throwing the inaugural Grey Area festival August 18 and 19.

The two day concert series will feature artists who have recorded at the studio, DJs local to the Iowa City area, aerial performances by Elevate Vertical Fitness and National Dance Academy, and a laser light show.

Wikimedia Commons

Today, President Trump signed into law legislation that levies new sanctions against Russia and restricts his own ability to ease those sanctions. 

Hans Hassell, assistant professor of political science at Cornell College says that Congress' act to send those sanctions to Trumps desk is important. 

"This is a really clear rebuke of the President saying, 'Look, what we've heard about Russia makes us very concerned,' so we're going to take these strong stances against Russia while you're trying to get us to relax those sanctions." 

Photo couresty of Kittie Weston-Knauer

Kittie Weston-Knauer is not your typical retiree. At the age of 67, she's the oldest female BMX athlete in the country.

She started racing after her son got into BMX. When given the choice to sit around and do nothing or compete, she says she will always choose to race and will continue with the sport for as long as she can. 

"I have always been competitive," she laughs. "Look, I grew up with five brothers."

Photo Courtesy of Sarah Cooper

Iowan Sarah Cooper recently finished one of the most grueling bike races in the country, Race Across America, placing 10th overall. She was the first woman to cross the finish line. If riding her bike 3,000 miles across the country wasn't hard enough, she did the second half of the race battling a condition called Shermer's Neck, which left her unable to hold her head up. 

Growing old brings challenges. Some of them are harder than others. 

"The hardest thing I had to adjust to was having my teeth in a glass of water next to my bed at night," laughs Evelyn Birkby, who is a nearly 98 and lives in her home in Sidney, Iowa. 

Birkby and her late husband Robert planned to age in their home, and they have done just that. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, she talks with host Charity Nebbe about their preparations, like building their home with a minimal number of stairs to make for easier access in older age. 

Liz Lawley / Flickr

Getting your baby or toddler to sleep can be one of the biggest challenges of parenting and for many parents, co-sleeping is the answer. The dangers of co-sleeping, however, have been well documented by the medical community. 

During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with author and associate professor of sociology at Iowa State University Susan Stewart who has recently published a new book Co-sleeping: Parents, Children and Musical Beds. 

flickr / RelaxingMusic

We all know that you're not you when you're tired. According to new sleep research, that's not just a saying, but it's scientifically true. New studies shows that sleep disturbances in young adults can worsen suicidal ideation, and it can even be harmful to your health to fight with your spouse when you haven't been sleeping well. 

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Dr. Eric Dyken of the University of Iowa about these new studies. He also answers listener questions about sleep. 

Wikimedia Commons

During their spring session, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that social media is a constitutional right. It also decided cases regarding same-sex parents and birth certificates, a case involving a potentially offensively named band and the protected status of offensive speech, and a case involving President Trump's travel ban. 

manhhai

After the US withdrew from the Vietnam War, its Indochinese allies were left facing torture, death, and imprisonment from the ruling communist regime. The Tai Dam, an ethnic group from northern Vietnam, petitioned the U.S. for sanctuary.

In 1975, Iowa Governor Robert Ray created an agency to relocate the group. During this hour of River to River host Ben Kieffer talks with Matthew Walsh, a professor of history at Des Moines Area Community College about his new book The Good Governor: Robert Ray and the Indochinese Refugees of Iowa.

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