Emily Woodbury

Talk Show Producer

Emily Woodbury has worked for Iowa Public Radio since 2011. She became a talk show producer in 2012. Her duties include researching show topics, booking guests, preparing news copy, editing audio, and directing live programming for IPR’s national-award winning shows River to River and Talk of Iowa.

She is also a member of Student Broadcasters Incorporated, which serves as an advisory board to the students who work at 89.7 FM KRUI in Iowa City. Prior to joining Iowa Public Radio, Emily worked as a news director for KRUI and as an intern for Chicago Public Media. She has won awards for her reporting and a couple of her news reports have been featured statewide on Iowa Public Radio's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Emily has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Iowa School of Journalism and Mass Communication and a minor in political science.

Emily Woodbury

Marsha Ternus was the first woman to serve as chief justice of the Iowa Supreme Court, but she's perhaps best known as one of the Iowa Supreme Court justices dismissed by Iowa voters three years ago, for her role in the decision that legalized same-sex marriage in the state. Host Ben Keiffer sits down with Ternus to get her thoughts on that ruling, and on justice and judicial independence in the U.S.

Emily Woodbury

More than half of the country’s teens have been bullied online, and about the same number have engaged in cyber-bullying. Today on River To River, a discussion on bullying in Iowa. Host Ben Kieffer hears the story of a young Iowan who was bullied, who now uses that experience to help others going through the same. Jacob Stallman is a 17-year-old Tipton resident who was named the 2013 Spirit of Matthew Award winner by the Matthew Shepard Foundation for his community work to overcome bullying and homophobia.

dmblue444 / flickr

Copper theft is quickly spreading throughout the state, costing taxpayers tens of thousands of dollars. Today on River To River, we take a look at the top Iowa news of the week. We look to Iowa City as the town debates the success of the 21-ordinance prior to the election. We also check in with the Iowa State Patrol to find out why they may switch from sedans to SUVs, and their new GPS projectile technology to assist in car chases.

Ronald van Holst

In her best-selling novels, Amy Tan has explored mother-daughter relationships that resonate across all cultures. In her latest novel, The Valley of Amazement, she does it again. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Tan about her latest novel, the photo that inspired it, and writing her very first sex scenes.

Amy Tan is part of this year's AViD Author Series, sponsored by the Des Moines Public Library Foundation. She will be in Des Moines on Sunday, November 10 at 3:00 PM at the Hoyt Sherman Place Theater.

Daniel Foster

Not only are the days getting colder, but they are also getting darker. Today on River To River, host Ben Kieffer talks with sleep doctor, Dr. Eric Dyken, about the effect of darker nights on your sleeping habits. They also discuss the correlation between sleep and dementia, a new study that shows the brain clears our harmful toxins while you sleep, and how sleep plays a role in diabetes risk.

Dr. Dyken is the Director of the Sleep Disorders Center at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.

infocux Technologies

We are living at a time when a simple Tweet or online posting can make you a celebrity overnight. Or, change your life for the worse, as when a University of Iowa teaching assistant accidentally emailed her students her own nude photos, instead of a classroom assignment.

This is also a time when private companies like Google and Facebook know more about a U.S. citizen than their own government. Today on River To River - a discussion of privacy-related news. We touch on everything from Google Glass to the international response to NSA surveillance methods.

Daniel Huber/NASA's Ames Research Center

Today on River To River, host Ben Kieffer checks in with an astronomer here in Iowa, who has found something new while observing a solar system about 3,000 light years from Earth… A discovery that gives us insight on how alien solar systems are structured.

And, we look into the discovery of a 1.8-million-year-old human skull in Europe that has ignited debate on the origins of distinct species of ancient human relatives.

Courtesy of Snyder family

Don Snyder never got to know his mother. She died just sixteen days after he and his twin brother were born in 1950. The truth about her death remained a secret for decades. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Don about discovering his mother’s secret and what he hopes to accomplish by telling her story.

Politics Day

Oct 16, 2013

More than two weeks after the start of the government shutdown, a deal finally comes out of the Senate. Today on River To River, it's politics day. IPR reporter Dean Borg guests hosts, joined by political scientists: Drake University's Dennis Goldford and the University of Iowa's Tim Hagle. They discuss the negotiations taking place in Washington, public opinion of Congress, and take your questions and comments.

Euan Slorach

When Henrietta Lacks died in 1951, her family had no idea that her cells would live on indefinitely…multiplying to the extent that laid together, they could wrap around the Earth at least 3 times. Today on River To River - the immortal life of Henrietta Lacks. Host Ben Kieffer talks with Lacks’ grandson about Henrietta's legacy. Her grandson, David Lacks Jr., will speak tonight in Iowa City as part of the Iowa City Book Festival.

Alaina Abplanalp Photography / flickr

In the wake of recent violence, including the recent Washington Navy Yard shooting, some look to gun control as a solution and some point to an increased focus on mental health care. Today host Ben Kieffer and guests examine the link (or lack thereof) between violence and mental illness, and they talk about the stigma surrounding the mentally ill.

In the second half of the program, they discuss the Iowa Mental Health and Disability Redesign signed into law back in 2011. And, they check in to see the impact of the transition so far and its effect looking towards the future.

CALI / flickr

Today is the opening of the Affordable Care Act's "Health Exchange Marketplace," but many Iowans are still confused about their options. Today on River To River, we clear up misconceptions and answer the questions  Iowans have while venturing into a new health care landscape.

Iowans In War

Sep 27, 2013
Christopher Ebdon / flickr

From the notable case of the Sullivan brothers in World War II, to the lesser known but significant involvement in the Civil War, Iowans have a long history of fighting for their country. Today on River To River, we close “Iowa Week” with an account of Iowa’s military history, from the Civil War, to current-day conflicts.

Iowa Inventors

Sep 23, 2013
Ray Krebs / flickr

We’ve all heard the phrase, “It’s the best thing since sliced bread,” but did you know the inventor of sliced bread is from Iowa? Today on River To River, we hear about the lives of some Iowa inventors that made an impact on their state, country, and even the world.

The Iowa inventors we cover on the show include:

Jimmy Emerson / jimmywayne / Flickr

Host Ben Kieffer gets the latest on news from around Iowa.  MidAmerican Energy gives an update on the power outage which left almost 40,000 Des Moines-area residents in the dark. IPR's Joyce Russell discusses changes to the problematic Toledo Juvenile Home.  The DNR has a new report which looks at drought conditions in Iowa.  Also, Dubuque native Brooks Wheelan joins the cast of "Saturday Night Live."

Ars Electronica / flickr

Do you ever wonder why, at a loud party, you are able to comprehend what the person next to you is saying? It’s not because they are louder… It’s due to your brain’s ability to filter and hone in on certain stimuli.

Today on River To River, we focus on the science of the brain with three prominent neuroscientists visiting Iowa. Host Ben Kieffer talks with them about their research on the sense of sound and gets their thoughts on the latest brain-science news.

NASA Blueshift / flickr

It’s taken more than three decades for NASA’s Voyager 1 to travel about 11 billion miles to reach the outskirts of our solar system and continue on into interstellar space. Today on River to River, we hear from research scientist, Bill Kurth, about his work on some of the spacecraft’s equipment that was built and operated by the University of Iowa.

Mojave Desert / flickr

For this News Buzz version of 'River to River' we hear about legally blind Iowans and gun permits, astronaut Clayton Anderson will join the Iowa State University faculty, the Cyclone/Hawkeye game is tomorrow, and hear about superstitions on this Friday the thirteenth.

When a child is born, so is a grandmother. Today on Talk of Iowa, we explore the 21st Century grandmother. Host Charity Nebbe talks with a scholar about how the roles of grandmothers have changed over the generations, and she receives some advice for modern grandma’s from the author of “The Grandparents Handbook.”

Guests on today's program include Victoria Brown, L.F. Parker Professor of History at Grinnell College, and Elizabeth LaBan, author of The Grandparent’s Handbook.

Emily Woodbury / IPR

Bailey Sweet, American Mother, Chieftain, Empire...there are many thousands of different kinds of apples in the world. And this year, Iowa apple growers are harvesting bumper crops. Today on Talk of Iowa, we talk apple history, apples in Iowa, heirloom apples, and your favorites.

Host Charity Nebbe speaks with Paul Rasch, owner of Wilson’s Orchard in Iowa City, Dan Bussey, orchard manager for the Seed Savers Exchange, Erika Janik, author of Apple: A Global History, and Patrick O’Malley, of Iowa State University Extension.

Before the Great Depression there was the farm recession, and times were tough for farm families in Iowa. This hour, we focus on the lives of rural Iowa women in the early twentieth century.

Host Charity Nebbe talks with author Chris Baker about his grandmother, growing up in rural Davis County in the 1920s. Baker recently published a book including journal entries detailing her life. And, historians Dorothy Schwieder and Katherine Jellison help us understand the times.

Torch Magazine

Last month the University of Iowa was ranked as the #1 party school by The Princeton Review.  Binge drinking is a problem on not only the Iowa City campus, but on college campuses across Iowa and the U.S. What is the nature of binge drinking and what can be done to curb it?

Clay Masters / IPR

The Gulf of Mexico is the largest hypoxic zone currently affecting the United States. Today on Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe hosts a discussion on water quality in Iowa and the connection our state has with the Gulf. We take a look at Iowa's Nutrient Reduction Strategy as a conservation plan.

Today's guests include: Iowa Public Radio reporter Clay Masters, Bill Stowe, the CEO and General Manager of Des Moines Water Works, Iowa's Secretary of Agriculture, Bill Northey, and John Lawrence, the Associate Dean in the Department of Economics at Iowa State University.

Alan Chan / Flickr

Vegetarianism was once thought of as radical. But in 2012, almost four percent of Americans were vegetarian or vegan. That's still a small minority, but almost half of Americans eat a vegetarian meal at least once a week.

Alex Laurie / Flickr

Host Charity Nebbe talks with Iowans who have participated in voluntourism, which is when volunteers travel to distant or exotic places like the beaches of Tanzania to volunteer at schools and hospitals.

Jeremy Wilburn / flickr

How sexually active is your teen? It turns out that 34% of Iowa high school students are currently sexually active. So what do you know about the sex-ed being taught at your kids’ school?

In the first part of our program, host Ben Kieffer learns about a nationally recognized sex education program that many Iowa schools use, which focuses on the financial impact of having a child. Then we broaden the discussion to find out what’s being taught in Iowa’s public schools and Catholic schools. What’s appropriate? What’s effective at preventing teen pregnancy?

Bairo Pite Hospital / http://www.bairopitehospital.org/

There’s a place in the world where 75% of the population still live in villages with no access to electricity, running water, or the Internet. That place is a little island in SE Asia, called East Timor.

Today on River To River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Iowa native Dan Murphy, who founded the Bairo Pite Hospital in the country back in 1999. Dan shares his experiences treating illness and disease in the area, and gives us an idea of why we should be focused on this little known developing country.

Farmers may harvest nearly 14 billion bushels of corn this year – that’s a record and 29% more than last year. However, as a result corn prices have dropped to their lowest since 2010.

Today on River To River, we explore this topic and much more! We travel to the Iowa State Fair, talk weather and corn price predictions, find out what a digitized cemetery is, and explore a new law cracking down on Iowans who register RVs in Montana to avoid paying the 5 percent Iowa registration fee and annual registration fees.

Ben Stanton / IPR

When Otty Schmakal left Austria at the beginning of World War II, she left behind her homeland and a fiancé who was training to be a doctor.  He was conscripted into the German Army and she eventually joined the US Army.  Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe hears the true World War II love story of Otty and Fred Blodi.

Charity also speaks with Tom Morain, of Graceland University, who provides insight on the Women's Army Auxillary Corps in Des Moines, as well as other WWII preparation efforts.

Ben Stanton / Iowa Public Radio

Studies estimate that at least one in every five veterans experiences post-traumatic stress disorder after returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, guest host Emily Woodbury talks with two Iowans working to change that statistic.

Steven Lancaster, an assistant professor of psychology at Drake University, discusses his new study on how a soldier's "military identity" affects their likelihood of experiencing anxiety or depression.

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