Dennis Reese

Mid-Day Host and Talk Show Producer

Dennis Reese is the mid-day host for Iowa Public Radio.  He is also a producer for the talk shows Talk of Iowa and River to River.  He is based in Iowa City. Dennis began his career in public radio at the University of Iowa’s WSUI in 1981 as its Program Director, after several stints as News Director at a number of commercial radio stations in Iowa and after working his way through college as a disc jockey in formats including Top 40, Easy Listening and country & western.  

Dennis has a master’s degree in Communication Studies from the University of Iowa and a  B.A. in Communication Studies from the University of Northern Iowa.

Dennis’ favorite public radio program is Car Talk.

Ways To Connect

Steve Brower

Aldo Leopold once wrote, “I am glad I will not be young in a future without wilderness.” It is partly due to his work that today's children don’t yet face that future.  Today Charity Nebbe continues Iowa Week a discussion on Iowa’s most influential conservationists.  She looks into the lives and work of Earnest Oberholtzer, John Lacey, Ada Hayden, and Louis Pammel.

http://almostpioneers.com/

In the fall of 1913, Laura and Earle Smith, a young Iowa couple from Moravia, made the gutsy decision to homestead in Wyoming. After four years of frustration, the Smiths moved back to Iowa and stayed put. Years later Laura wrote a vivid and self-depracating memioir of their time in Wyoming. Scholar John Fry discovered the manuscript, never before published, in the Women's Archives at the University of Iowa. Now, Laura's memoir has been published, titled "Almost Pioneers: One Couple's Homesteading Adventure in the West," edited by Fry.

Menopause

Sep 18, 2013
Ryan Lintelman / flickr

Hot flashes, night sweat, insomnia, irritability, anxiety…not all women experience these symptoms when they go through menopause though many do. This hour Charity Nebbe tackles menopause with evolutionary biologist Anne Bronikowski who explains how menopause is unique to the human species. Also Judith Houck, author of Hot and Bothered: Women, Medicine and Menopause in Modern America and gynecologist Dr. Susan Johnson join the program.

Stan Oleson

Ever since the first person set eyes on the Mississippi River, the power of the river has helped to build and destroy settlements and cities.  It has served as a source of life and food and a highway from north to south.  It has also gripped imaginations, launched amazing journeys, and inspired music, art and literature.  Paul Schneider is one of the most recent writers to fall under the thrall of the Mississippi.  His latest book is “Old Man River: The Mississippi River in North American History.”

The National Guard / Flickr

To most, the word "home" means more than just a place to sleep and store property. This hour Charity Nebbe talks about what home means as well as what it means to lose one's home and find it again with Sally Ooms, author of Finding Home: How Americans Prevail. In her book Ooms profiles people who have been displaced by family pressures, economic pressures, and natural disasters. 

Designed by M.C. Ginsberg’s custom design team in collaboration with the University of Iowa’s College of Public Health

The encephalitis virus can have some ugly consequences, but, it turns out, it can also be shaped into a beautiful pair of earrings. Today on Talk Of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks about infectious art inspired by disease and other artistic endeavors that are inspired by nature.

Robert and Talbot Trudeau / flickr

Since 1995, the Iowa African American Hall of Fame (IAAHF) has been selecting the most influential black Iowans to be recognized for outstanding achievements.  Guest host Dennis Reese talks with the three inductees selected for 2013: Jane G. Burleson, Betty Jean Furgerson, and William B. Hood, Jr.  The IAAHF is housed at the Black Cultural Center at Iowa State University.   Since its inception, more than 50 people have been chosen for this honor, including Iowa State Agricultural College graduate George Washington Carver. 

jridgewayphotography / Flickr

Stores and manufacturers will try almost anything to sell their product and employ a number of techniques to manipulate shoppers.  However, some shoppers like extreme couponer Mary Potter Kenyon, are able to make the system work for them.  Kenyon lives in Manchester, Iowa and writes a weekly couponing column for the Dubuque Telegraph Herald.

Michael Holler / Flickr

Host Charity Nebbe and Patricia O'Connor, aka The Word Maven, discuss the words and phrases of summer.  O'Connor reveals the origins of dog days, bikini, lemonade and barbecue.

Gilad Rom / Flickr

Today we listen back to a conversation from November on Superman, Spiderman, the X-Men, and many other superheroes have been fighting for truth, justice and the American way for decades. Many of the men who created these characters were Jewish and, in his new book, philosopher Harry Brod explores how Jewish culture is reflected in the lives of our favorite superheroes. Then, comic book artist Phil Hester joins the conversation to talk about his work.

The Curve Of The World

Jul 23, 2013
Bottom Dog Press

Iowa Citian Andy Douglas has published his memoir, The Curve of the World: Into the Spiritual Heart of Yoga. When he was in his 20s, Douglas turned aside from his minister father’s Christian beliefs and took up a life of yoga and meditation, eventually going on to becoming an Ananda Marga monk, leading the organization’s Seoul office. We hear about his life as a monk and his eventual return to the United States to fight Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Charity Nebbe / IPR

Host Charity Nebbe speaks with Peter Trachtenberg, who is teaching this summer at the University of Iowa, about his latest book, Another Insane Devotion: On the Love of Cats and Persons.  It explores the fierce and tender bonds of love between people and cats.  Also, we get an update on this summer’s kitten explosion in Iowa, from the directors of two Iowa animal shelters.

Gene Wilburn / Flickr

Many Iowans have been battling swarms of gnats for the past few weeks and the dreaded mosquito is soon to come.  Host Charity Nebbe talks with entomologist Donald Lewis about why the gnats keep getting into ears, eyes, nose and hair; he'll also give his prediction of this year's mosquito season.  Horticulturist Richard Jauron joins the conversation. 

Crown Archetype

Comedian Jim Gaffigan started his career discussing life as a single guy in New York.  Now Gaffigan is married and lives with his five kids in a two bedroom, five-floor walk-up apartment in Manhattan. Host Charity Nebbe talks with the comic about his new book "Dad is Fat" which explores the complexities of fatherhood as well as the pros and cons of a delicacy known as “Hot Pocket.”  

Charity Nebbe / Iowa Public Radio

Last summer many wild animals suffered because of a lack of water, this year nests have been washed out and wild babies have been separated from their mothers through floods and storms. Host Charity Nebbe talks with wildlife biologist Jim Pease about how natural disasters affect the boom and bust cycles of Iowa's wildlife populations.

Lileah Harris

When Lennox Randon asked his friends Rob Cline and Dennis Green to form a writing group, they were reluctant to devote the time until Randon mentioned his diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer.  Now the three Cedar Rapids residents have been meeting weekly for more than two years to write, read and help each other polish their work.  Their dedication has paid off with three separate publishing contracts.  The men are each mystery writers,

Grand Central Publishing

Benjamin Percy's new novel "Red Moon" is a coming of age story, with razor sharp political commentary, an inventive rewriting of human history, the science of animal borne pathogens, and good old fashioned horror.  Host Charity Nebbe and Percy discusses his arduous research process which took him to the veterinary labs of Iowa State University and taxidermy shops.

Flickr / Cara Harpole

Fish and fresh veggies make an appealing paring for dinner, but they can also be a great duo in the greenhouse.  Host Charity Nebbe discusses aquaponics, which is the growing of crops with nutrient rich waste water from fish farming.  Iowa State University Extension fisheries specialist Allen Pattillo and horticulturist Richard Jauron join the program.

Summer Reading

May 23, 2013
Sarah Boden / IPR

Summer brings with it many pleasures, and one of those pleasures is the time to dig into a great book.  Host Charity Nebbe previews books for summer reading lists with Paul Ingram and Jan Weismiller of Prairie Lights Books in Iowa City and Annie Leonard of The Next Chapter bookstore in Knoxville. 

Legend has it that in 1903, for several nights in a row the small town of Van Meter was terrorized by a giant bat-like creature. One-hundred ten years later, Talk of Iowa tries to uncover the truth with author Chad Lewis, a paranormal investigator and co-author of the new book "The Van Meter Visitor: A True and Mysterious Encounter with the Unknown."

University of Iowa Press / James Landenberger

There is no substitute for seeing a soaring red tailed hawk, circling turkey vulture or bald eagle snatching a fish out of a river, but the paintings of the late James Landenberger capture some of the majesty of these moments.  Talk of Iowa talks about Iowa's birds of prey with Jon Stravers, is the the Driftless Area Coordinator for the National Audubon Society's

Basheer Tome / flickr

Fire is the original way to cook and it’s making a comeback in Iowa. Today on Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe hosts a discussion on wood fired ovens, a growing trend in the restaurant business. Food Critic Jim Duncan shares how these ovens are being used in restaurants around the state and Matt Steigerwald talks about the wood fired pizza oven at his Lincoln Wine Bar in Mt. Vernon.

Working Group Theatre

When Alzheimer's disease robs someone of their memory, it's not just that person who experiences loss.  "Talk of Iowa" explores the path of people who care for loved ones with memory loss. 

Storm Kings

Mar 21, 2013
Flickr / koschi

Tornados weren’t commonly called tornados until the early 20th century.  Instead these violent storms were referred to as landspouts, whirlwinds or cyclones.  Author Lee Sandlin talks to “Talk of Iowa” about his new book “Storm Kings” which details the history of a group of storm chasers from the 1800s who were instrumental in advancing the scientific understanding of tornados.

It’s described as a complex ecosystem, a perfect place for a biological field station. Today on Talk of Iowa, we hear about the history of the Iowa Lakeside Lab, near Lake Okoboji. Thousands of Iowa college students have spent time there over the last 114 years, thanks to the dream of a University of Iowa president who died in 1934.

Rustik Rooster Farms

When he was a kid, Carl Blake II raised pigs for Iowa county fairs. But now as a farmer in his 40s, Blake thought pork should taste better. So he bred his own pig, based on a 19th century German hog.  He says this odd-looking, fatty porcine is so tasty that it melts in your mouth. We’ll find out how the Iowa Swabian Hall is now the favorite of some of America’s top chefs.  Also, we hear about the one Iowa farmer growing edible dry beans. Jason Grimm of Grimm Family Farms in Iowa County is having great success with his Black Turtle beans.

blmiers2 / flickr

Spring is coming.  In these few remaining weeks of winter there are some things we need to get done out in the yard. Forester Mark Vitosh and horticulturist Richard Jauron will be here. We’ll talk about what we need to do before spring arrives and Mark and Richard will answer your questions.

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