Ben Stanton

Talk Show Producer

Ben Stanton started in radio doing public affairs programs in Phoenix.  He has worked as a reporter at commercial and public radio stations in Iowa and Alaska.  He first came to IPR in 2013 and he has been a talk show producer and substitute host. He lives in Washington, Iowa with his family.

Photo submitted

Ethan and Bethany Anderson of West Liberty recently returned from spending time in Mafraq, Jordan.  The trip was to assist refugees that had relocated from Syria.  On this World Refugee Day, Talk of Iowa host Charity Nebbe talks with Bethany and Ethan about how the trip went, what they saw, and what the condition are like for refugees there.

On the trip, Ethan and Bethany were joined by local staff and volunteers of the Alliance Church.

What's the point of a family vacation? Every family is different, but there are some things people can do to better ensure success. In this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks about how spending time on a vacation together can be healthy and meaningful. 

Joining the program is Karen Melton, an assistant professor of Child and Family Studies at Baylor University in Texas. Melton says that time with family should be intentional time together, but that doesn't mean every moment must be together. 

Ben Stanton/IPR

Farm toys can be toy tractors, harvesters, plows, and other equipment.  Some are meant to be played with, and others—the "precision models"—many people take great care to keep in good shape.  During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe explores what farm toys mean to collectors. 

Guests include Kate Bossen of Bossen Implement in Lamont; Amanda Schwartz, the manager of the National Farm Toy Museum in Dyersville; and Chuck Steffens from Sherrill, who makes custom parts to add to the farm toy models.

Sanofi Pasteur / Patrick Boulen

Chikungunya is a debilitating inflammatory virus carried by mosquitoes. The University of Iowa is one of three sites in the U.S. that is enrolling participants for a clinical trial of an experimental vaccine for chikungunya. The illness has been found in the U.S.

Breanna Walton

Returning from three combat tours in Iraq, native Iowan Alex Sutton forges a new identity as a farmer, hatching chicks and raising goats on 43 acres in North Carolina. While he finds at least partial relief through farming, he cannot shake the lingering traumas of war. His life after war and subsequent struggles with PTSD are documented by director/cinematographer Alix Blair in her documentary Farmer/Veteran: A Combat Veteran's Fragile Struggle to Overcome Trauma and Transition to Life as a Farmer.

Baycrest

If you're visiting another country and disaster strikes, U.S. Consulates are there to help you. They can also help answer questions like: How should you contact your relatives if you end up in the hospital abroad? How can you keep your passport safe? What should you do if it gets stolen?

Kirkwood Community College

Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds and former Governor Terry Branstad have marked 2017 as the "Year of Manufacturing." But what is the state of manufacturing in Iowa?

On this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer explores the future of advanced manufacturing and skilled labor in Iowa.  

Nathan Thornton, a second year welding student at Kirkwood Community College, says he has an optimistic outlook for his career path.

Author Loretta Ellsworth has written a number of books for young adults. This is her first novel aimed at an adult reader.  The reader is taken back and forth in time as the main character recalls her life and cherished memories.  The historic Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake is part of the setting weaved together with a 1940's World War II backdrop.  Ellsworth grew up in Mason City and her own parents met at the Surf Ballroom.

MrTinDC

It was not very long ago that eagles, osprey, peregrine falcons and other raptors were a rare sight in Iowa. One of the people who worked hard to bring these species back from the brink is Pat Schlarbaum. In this Talk of Iowa with Charity Nebbe, hear from Schlarbaum as he retires from a thirty-three year career with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.  Also joining the conversation is Bruce Ehresman who has worked with Schlarbaum on many of his projects.

ThoseGuys119 / Flickr

On this news buzz edition of River to River, guest-host Ben Stanton talks with Iowa Public Radio reporter Sarah Boden about how transportation costs are creating an education funding disparity between rural and urban Iowa.

Ben Kieffer / Iowa Public Radio

In Iowa, the craft beer industry has been booming. New breweries have been opening everywhere from Clear Lake to Iowa City to Des Moines. J. Wilson is minister of beer at the Iowa Brewers Guild.  He says the growth is a return to what the beer industry looked like before prohibition.

Pig Fit Bit

May 12, 2017
Martin Cathrae

When Matthew Rooda began working on a pig farm, he very quickly discovered one of the biggest problems facing pork producers was large sows rolling over and killing their piglets.  This news buzz edition of River to River, we hear how Rooda's new invention keeps track of health data about pigs and prevents piglets from being crushed. Rooda is the C.E.O of SwineTech and is a University of Iowa student graduating this spring.

Ben Kieffer/IPR

In this special edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer takes a tour of a new exhibit at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum that opens this weekend. Museum Director Tom Schwartz gives some insight into American Presidents as people.

Screenshot: Iowa Public Television's "Greetings From Iowa"

Iowa Public Television has unveiled their new digital-first series "Greetings from Iowa."  In this Talk of Iowa conversation, host Charity Nebbe talks with IPTV Producer/Director Tyler Brinegar who developed the series and IPTV's Digital Content Manager Taylor Shore.  

Dwight Sipler

If a farmer grows lettuce and a local school district wants to use it in the cafeteria, who chops it? It proves to be a more challenging question to answer than it might seem.

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe explores the middle structure of the local food system by talking with Brandi Janssen about her new book, Making Local Food Work: The Challenges and Opportunities of Today's Small Farmers.

Doc Searls

What we want out of students attending school has changed over hundreds of years.  Are we preparing students for jobs, for life, for citizenship, for social mobility? During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe explores the history of the debate with University of Iowa's Chris Ogren, associate professor of history of education in the department of Educational Policy and Leadership Studies.

Director of the Iowa Department of Education Ryan Wise, and two retired teachers, Charles Blair-Broeker and Michael Peterson, also join the conversation. 

Glory Days was a live story telling sponsored by Iowa Watch and Iowa Public Radio. It took place in Iowa City on Saturday, April 8. 

Here are the stories in order:

Host Charity Nebbe started off the program with a story of her own about the many things that were going on beneath the surface during her high school experience.   

John Paul Derryberry talked about his "twin" Eric.  Both friends had lost their fathers at a young age.  Eric also shared the use of his handicap parking permit.

Nina Youngbear

Shelley Buffalo is  a member of the Meskwaki Tribe in central Iowa. When she left the tribe's settlement to go to college, she was faced with questions about Native American culture. Some of her answers to those questions took years to fully form. Recently, she founded the Jingle Dress Society as a way for natives to express their culture, and she hopes it lets them take control of their own narrative.

In this Talk of Iowa interview, host Charity Nebbe talks with Buffalo about the idea behind Jingle Dress Society, as well as the emotions behind it.

A Stalk to Stand On

Jun 27, 2016

With tomato season fast approaching it's time to talk about how to train those unruly veggies.

Ben Stanton talks with Iowa State Assistant Professor and Vegetable Extension Specialist Ajay Nair about the best way to keep your precious plants upright, and alternative support setups for larger-scale systems. They also discuss the importance of pruning, and how to spot the difference between determinate and indeterminate plants.

"When we prune our plants, the fruits are bigger and the plants are more productive in terms of yield and performance," Nair said.

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Noonan syndrome is a genetic condition.  The characteristic facial features include low set ears, widely spaced-eyes, bright blue or blue-green eyes, a low hairline at the back of the head, and multiple congenital problems like heart defects and an unusually shaped chest.

A person with Noonan syndrome is often short, has a broad or webbed neck, low set nipples, and bleeding problems.  Developmental delay or intellectual disability are also common.

University of the Fraser Valley / flickr

A jury has awarded a former Bedford High School football player nearly $1 million for the way the school handled the player's head injuries. The player, Kacey Strough, had a pre-existing medical condition, involving abnormally formed blood vessels in his brain, that bled after he suffered a head injury. Strough was allowed to keep practicing and playing through this injury.

On this news buzz edition of River to River, guest-host Ben Stanton interviews Dr. Andy Peterson of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics to learn about the implications of this case.

Jessica Lucia

Join host Charity Nebbe for the first of a two-part series about how children grow up.  

How do boys develop? What are their challenges and risks? During this Talk of Iowa program, Nebbe explores those questions with her guests and gets some perspective on how changes in education have affected how boys perform in the classroom.

For part two of this series, "Raising Girls" click here.

Ben Kieffer / Iowa Public Radio

For Veterans Day, join host Ben Kieffer as he travels to Washington D.C. with more than 80 Iowa veterans.

Courtesy of Iowa DOT

On this News Buzz edition of River to River, guest host Ben Stanton talks with Joyce Russell about the odd legal path of the telemed abortion case and with Johnson County Attorney Janet Lyness about certain Iowa counties refusal to honor ICE 'detainers.' Also on the program, we remember Iowa historian Dorothy Schwieder, talk to an Iowan about his world-class Ironman win and learn what exactly a beer cave is from the Gazette's Brian Morelli.

Iowa State Fair

Last year at the Iowa State Fair, Jason Powell of Des Moines said his free speech rights were violated after security guards ordered him to stop preaching on public sidewalks. Today on River to River, we find out the status of his lawsuit as well as whether he will be allowed at this year’s fair. We also find out about an Iowa developed vaccine that could cure dust-mite allergies. That and all the week’s Iowa stories on a news buzz edition of River to River.

Politicians Weigh In On Immigrant Children

Jul 23, 2014
Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

More than 52,000 have crossed the southern border since October and US politicians are having trouble finding solutions and the right rhetoric. 

Australian Department of Defence / Copyright: © Commonwealth of Australia 2005; Wikipedia licensed under Fair Use

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, ISIS, has made major advances and taken control of portions of Iraq where U.S. soldiers once fought.  Three years after the U.S. military's role ended in Iraq, following a decade of conflict, Iraq has devolved into a sectarian conflict.  Host Ben Stanton talks with Jim McCormick, Professor and Chair of Political Science at Iowa State University and Wayne Moyer, Rosenfield Professor of Political Science at Grinnell College about how the U.S. should respond to the Iraqi crisis.

Ben Stanton

Today we listen back to a show, part of Iowa Public Radio's corrections series last summer, about what it is like to grow old and die in prison.

We hear from an offender who works in a hospice program. He has helped 20 fellow inmates face the end of life behind bars. Host Ben Kieffer also talk with a 74-year-old inmate about growing old. We also tour a hospice room at the Iowa Medical and Classification Center in Coralville.

Courtesy of Tanya Keith

The World Cup kicked off yesterday in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The USA team is slated to compete with Ghana on Monday (June 16). Here with us to preview the events is Tanya Keith, who has spent the last two decades avidly following the World Cup, quite literally, from country to country, as a super-fan. Tanya is from Des Moines, Iowa.

Guest: Tanya Keith, Author of Passionate Soccer Love, soccer fan, writer, Des Moines resident

Personal Publicity

Standup comedian, author, and Wait Wait Don't Tell Me panelist, Paula Poundstone, will be in Des Moines next Saturday, June 21st at Hoyt Sherman Place. She joins River to River to talk comedy style and 'tweeting' comedy.

"The first time somebody showed me Twitter, I thought it was the stupidest, most ego-centric thing I've ever seen in my life," says Poundstone. "I still think that, it's just that I enjoy it very much."

Showtime:  8:00PM / Tickets:  $31 - $46 / Call:  515-244-0507

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