Ben Stanton

Talk Show Producer

Ben Stanton started in radio doing public affairs programs in Phoenix.  He has worked as a reporter at commercial and public radio stations in Iowa and Alaska.  He first came to IPR in 2013 and he has been a talk show producer and substitute host. He lives in Washington, Iowa with his family.

Photo submitted

Former Iowans John and Sue Little moved to Hawaii a couple years ago, and they live on the island where the eruption of Kilauea Volcano has been causing disruptions for residents there.  Little joins this River to River segment to explain what's happening, what the threat is, and whether he misses Iowa winters (spoiler: he doesn't).

John Pemble / Iowa Public Radio

State Senator Nate Boulton has suspended his candidacy for the Democratic nomination to the Iowa Governor's race in light of accusations of sexual misconduct.  In this news buzz edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by IPR reporter and Morning Edition host Clay Masters to talk through the status of that race.

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Oregon State University Archives

Between 1942 and 1966, the Bracero Program brought 4.6 million Mexican migrant workers to the United States including to jobs in Iowa. They were working largely in agricultural jobs.

Brian Behnken is an associate professor of history and the U.S. Latino studies program at Iowa State University. He explains the history of the program, how it was implemented, and what was required of workers and employers.

The program began during World War Two.

Photo of workshop by Donna Belk and Sandy Booth

In recent years, there has been expansion of palliative care, which is medical care that focuses on providing relief from the symptoms and stress of serious illness.  There also has been increased availability of hospice care, which is designed to give support and comfort to people in the final phase of a terminal illness. There’s a new movement in end of life care called death midwifery.

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DayTrippin US

Dianne Bystrom is the Director of the Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics at Iowa State University. When she came to Iowa in 1996, she had been studying a big year in politics for women: the 1992 election, which brought a huge increase in women holding political office. 

Phil Thomson

In this Talk of Iowa segment, host Charity Nebbe is joined by Mark Simmet and Tony Dehner of IPR's Studio One to look at some of the music you can hear at Iowa's 2018 summer music festivals. Scroll down for Tony and Mark's lists of suggested listening.

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Carl Wycoff

The U.S. House's attempt to pass a farm bill failed this morning.  A number of Republicans were trying to leverage votes for a conservative immigration bill first.

Congressman David Young from Iowa's third district voted for the bill, and he says that he is confident that there will ultimately be a farm bill.  But he says it's tough for farmers especially in light of other trade policies.

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UN Photo/Joao Araujo Pinto

On the same day the U.S. Embassy in Israel moves to Jerusalem, over fifty Palestinians were killed by the Israeli military. On this politics day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer gets analysis of the conflict in Gaza.  Other foreign policy is covered including the latest on the Iran nuclear deal, a meeting with north Korea might be in jeapordy, and what CIA Director nominee Gina Haspel's views on torture mean for the United States. 

Also, the guests discuss what Tuesday’s midterm primaries may mean for control of Congress and Trump’s rising poll numbers. 

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Chris Clayson

The laws, morals, and ethics which guide us, can also confuse us, and sometimes challenge us to improve or change the rules.

In this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe gets a look at the philosophy of rules with Scott Samuelson, a philosophy professor at Kirkwood Community College. He says that he's learned a lesson stemming from the life of Socrates that for the most part, rules are important to follow, and when they need to change, then sometimes civil disobedience is that way that is done.

This special edition of River to River is in partnership with Iowa's The Gazette. "Pints and Politics" was a lively discussion of local and national politics that was recorded at Big Grove Brewery in Iowa City on Thursday, May 10.  

Emily Woodbury/IPR

Two years ago, the launch of the virtual reality headset Oculus Rift was the first time consumers had access to relatively affordable virtual reality. While still not a household staple, market forecasts predict that virtual and augmented reality will be a $40 billion industry by 2020. 

Clay Masters / IPR

The United States will be withdrawing from the Iran nuclear deal, which was a deal that President Obama's administration spent two years negotiating. President Trump announced the news yesterday calling the agreement "rotten." 

"What this means is that there will be severe limits on American corporations dealing with Iran in terms of trade and in terms of investment," explains Wayne Moyer of Grinnell College. 

"The problem is that if the agreement collapses and the Iranians then restart their enriching of uranium, what will the U.S. do then?"

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Artiom Ponkratenko

The intersection of art and agriculture is important to Mary Swander. She says art has been a part of ag for a long time with concepts like folk art. Now she has helped start a new non-profit called AgArts.

She says that we are in a dilemma with issues involving pollution, erosion, decline of the family farm, decline of small towns, and the arts have a role in addressing those issues in a way that people can embrace and that helps with revitalization.

John Pemble/IPR

Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds does not face a primary election challenger and there are six Democrats running for their party's nomination. But, there's also a primary race for Libertarians this June.

The Libertarian Party of Iowa has full political party status for the first time this election cycle. That's because of a record-breaking showing in Iowa for presidential candidate Gary Johnson in 2016. There are two candidates running for their party's nomination: Marco Battaglia and Jake Porter.

Francis Benjamin Johnston / Library of Congress

George Washington Carver's journey from slavery to scientific accomplishment has inspired millions. But over time, many of his greatest accomplishments have been overshadowed by his reputation as "that peanut man."

nate boulton
John Pemble / Iowa Public Radio

Editor's note: Nate Boulton suspended his campaign for governor on May 24, a day after the Des Moines Register published accusations of sexual misconduct from three women.  This interview with Boulton was conducted in late April.

Barry Phipps

Multimedia artist Barry Phipps has been traveling the state and taking photographs for the last six years. Now we can see Iowa through his lens in the new book Between Gravity and What Cheer: Iowa Photographs.

On this Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe sits down with Phipps to learn what attracted him about Iowa small towns and how his work offers a counter-narrative about rural America.

The White House

Dr. Ronny Jackson has been a White House physician since 2006. He's also a United States Navy rear admiral who has been nominated for Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

There are numerous allegations against him concerning his ability to lead, as well as an allegation that he's mishandled prescription drugs. During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with political analysts Dave Andersen and Jim McCormick of Iowa State University. 

Iowa Public Radio

During graduation season, many parents will be looking back and thinking about all the milestones their children have achieved on their way to this major rite of passage. The new picture book Sometimes You Fly captures this moment.

On this Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe is joined by Newbery Award-winning author Katherine Applegate, best known for her book The One and Only Ivan. Sometimes You Fly is illustrated by Iowa City-based artist Jennifer Black Reinhardt, who also joins the conversation. 

RebelAt (Missouri); Carol M. Highsmith (Nebraska); Vijay Kumar Koulampet (Wisconsin); McGhiever (Minnesota)

On this edition of River to River, while Iowa lawmakers work on closing a budget deal that would end this year’s session, we learn about what other statehouses around the Midwest have been tackling this year.

Host Ben Kieffer talks with statehouse reporters and hosts from Minnesota, Wisconsin, Nebraska, and Missouri, where allegations of sexual assault and blackmail against Missouri Governor Eric Greitens have dominated the political landscape.

Rooy Media

David James "DJ" Savarese is a poet, prose writer, and recent alumni of Oberlin College, where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a double major in Anthropology and Creative Writing. He is also autistic and nonspeaking.

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Andrew Bardwell

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with legal analysts Todd Pettys, H. Blair and Joan V. White Chair in Civil Litigation and law professor at the University of Iowa, and Tony Gaughan, Professor of Law and Drake University Law School about prominent cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. 

Along with some other courts news, here are some of the cases they discuss:

Benisek v. Lamone and Gill v Whitford  – Both are gerrymandering cases.

stephan

In this politics day edition of River to River, host Ben Keiffer is joined by Steffen Schmidt, Lucken Professor of Political Science at Iowa State University and Wayne Moyer, Rosenfield Professor of Political Science at Grinnell College.

The analysts cover recent political news including recent airstrikes in Syria, a possible meeting between President Donald Trump and North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un, and a remembrance of former First Lady Barbara Bush.

Charity Nebbe / Iowa Public Radio

From pick-up games to organized leagues, every hometown team has its heroes. Hometown sports continue to shape and unite us in towns, cities, and states across the country.

In Mount Vernon, a traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian’s "Museum on Main Street Program" is working to celebrate local sports heroes and the broader impact of athletics on our communities. “Hometown Teams: How Sports Shape America” will be on display at the First Street Community Center from March 18 to April 29, 2018.

Fifth Ward Saints

When Carlos Honore moved to Iowa City from Baton Rouge in 1989, the move was something of a culture shock. By his eighth grade year, facing problems at home, Honore wound up in juvenile court.

But instead of being sent to a juvenile detention center, Honore was put on probation and found sports. He played football and wrestling and later competed in track and soccer. In the mid-90s, he was instrumental in getting the football team at Iowa City's West High School to the 1995 4A championship.  

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John Sachs www.tech-fall.com

The United World Wrestling Men’s Freestyle World Cup is this weekend.  Athletes from teams all over the world are descending on Iowa City for that event.  Noticeably absent is Russia. The U.S. embassy in Moscow was unable to expedite visa interviews, according to USA Wrestling.

Cedar Rapids Gazette wrestling reporter K.J. Pilcher says international politics play a part.

"If it were up to the wrestlers on both sides, everybody would be involved.  I just think politics got in the way of competition here and Russia unfortunately isn't going to make it," he said.

Alessio Maffeis

There comes a time when every new generation has to learn about one of the greatest atrocities in world history: the Holocaust. This year's Holocaust Remembrance Day is on April 12, and how we learn about and remember the Holocaust as survivors pass away is evolving.

On this Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe is joined by Jeremy Best, assistant professor of history at Iowa State University, and Dan Reynolds, Seth Richards professor at Grinnell and author of Postcards from Auschwitz: Holocaust Tourism and the Meaning of Remembrance.

Public Domain

China has proposed tariffs on U.S. pork and soybeans, two of Iowa's major agricultural exports. In this politics day edition of River to River we talk about the potential political fallout of the brewing trade war between the U.S. and China. Dennis Goldford, professor and chair of political science at Drake University and Tim Hagle, associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa share their thoughts about this issue and the week's other political developments. IPR's Ben Stanton hosts the conversation.

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Sergey Galyonkin

The Iowa Department of Public Health has offered cannabis dispensary licenses to proposed stores in Council Bluffs, Davenport, Sioux City, Waterloo, and Windsor Heights.

In this news buzz edition of River to River, Emily Woodbury talks with Des Moines Register Health Reporter Tony Leys about what that means for Iowans.

Katherine Perkins / Iowa Public Radio

Whether or not to expand, repeal, or restructure Iowa’s bottle bill, the legislation that created the bottle deposit in Iowa, has been a perennial issue at the state capitol. This year, the conversation surrounding the bill has been more serious. There have been bills introduced to repeal the bottle bill, bills to expand it, and now there’s ongoing discussion about creating an amendment to another bill that would move can and bottle redemption out of grocery stores across Iowa.

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