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12:45 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

North Korea's Rhetoric And Nuclear Capabilities

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 11:48 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Late last week, North Korea responded to new U.N. sanctions with hyperbolic language. A statement described the new measures as a declaration of war. Pyongyang deserves special vitriol for the United States, our sworn enemy, it said. A new nuclear weapons test would target the United States, and it described its new long-range missile as designed to strike U.S. territory.

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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

Feeling All Cooped Up In The Syrian Capital

Many Syrians in the capital Damascus are feeling cooped up by the ongoing war. Here, a woman and her child who fled the fighting in their home area take refuge at a school in Damascus last September.
Muzaffar Salman AP

The author, a Syrian citizen, is not being identified due to safety concerns.

Rami is buff and athletic. For the past few years, he has supported himself and his wife working as a full-time personal trainer in the Syrian capital Damascus.

Now, he complains that his daily routine has been reduced to spending hours at home watching television.

"I end up watching the sultan's harem with my in-laws," he said, referring to a popular Turkish soap opera set in Ottoman times and dubbed into Arabic. "It's driving me crazy."

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Business
12:35 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

A 'Permatemp' Economy: The Idea Of The Expendable Employee

According to the American Staffing Association, the U.S. temp industry has added more jobs than any other over the past three years.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 1:00 pm

As lawmakers in Washington debate job creation, and unemployment rates remain high, the temporary labor workforce continues to grow.

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Law
12:35 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

Senators Propose Principles For Immigration Reform

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 2:13 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. A year ago, most political observers would have dismissed the idea of a comprehensive immigration reform bill as pie in the sky. Today a bipartisan group of eight U.S. senators offered an outline that includes a key Democratic demand - a path to citizenship for those millions who entered the country illegally; and key Republican demands for tighter border security and a program to keep track of foreigners who overstay their visas.

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The Two-Way
12:24 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

Queen Beatrix, Of The Netherlands, Abdicates In Favor Of Son

Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands inspects the honor guard with Singapore President Tony Tan at the Istana in January.
Chris McGrath Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 5:34 pm

Beginning April 30, the Netherlands will have a king.

Queen Beatrix announced in a nationally televised address today that after more than 30 years on the throne, she will abdicate in favor of Prince Willem-Alexander.

The BBC reports:

"Queen Beatrix is the sixth monarch from the House of Orange-Nassau, which has ruled the Netherlands since the early 19th Century.

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Iceland Wins Big Case Over Failed Bank

A file picture shows a woman entering a branch of Iceland's second largest bank, Landsbanki (Landsbankinn) on October 8, 2008 in Rejkjavik.
Olivier Morin AFP/Getty Images

Iceland was handed a huge win today by the court of the European Free Trade Association.

The court said that Iceland did not break the law when it decided not to cover the losses of foreigners who had deposited money in Landsbanki, the Icelandic bank that failed in 2008.

The AP explains:

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The Two-Way
11:39 am
Mon January 28, 2013

VIDEO: Look Out! Car Suddenly Emerges From Foam On Highway

On Australia's "sunshine coast" over the weekend, storms whipped up sea foam. It was so thick it covered this car. Thankfully, as it emerged the people who had been watching were able to get out of the way.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 11:46 am

Weekend storms on Australia's "sunshine coast" whipped up sea foam that covered the beach and roads. And when we say covered, we're talking about deep stuff.

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Shots - Health News
11:34 am
Mon January 28, 2013

What's Wrong With Calling Obesity A Medical Problem?

Fat, fit or both?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 10:26 am

Americans have gotten heavier since 1980 — this we know.

And most doctors would say that the extra weight has made us more prone to heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, hypertension and even cancer.

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National Security
11:11 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Rep. Duckworth: About Time For Women In Combat

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 2:55 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up in the program we will have the first of a series of conversations we're having this week about how young people are using social media. We're calling the series Social Me and that will be later in the program.

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Africa
11:11 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Zimbabwe Activists Won't Back Down To Mugabe

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 2:55 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we keep hearing about the trouble kids can get into and cause with their online identities, but new research suggests that there are some advantages, too, and we will talk about that in our new miniseries, Social Me, and we'll start that series in just a few minutes.

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The Two-Way
10:58 am
Mon January 28, 2013

After Rising To Pre-recession Levels, Stocks Pause; Will Bulls Resume Running?

Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Almost as surely as the sun rises in the east, stories about the stock market hitting new highs are sure to be followed by declines in key indexes.

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Remembrances
10:37 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Remembering Journalist Stanley Karnow

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 2:22 pm

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Pulitzer prize-winning journalist and historian Stanley Karnow, whose best-selling book "Vietnam: A History," was the basis of an acclaimed public television documentary series, died Sunday at the age of 87. His work as a foreign correspondent was centered in southeast Asia, where he spent more than three decades, starting in 1959 when he began his reporting from Vietnam.

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The Two-Way
9:52 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Iran Claims 'Major Achievement;' Says Monkey Was Sent Into Space

An image from Iran's state-controlled Press TV showing the monkey that was reportedly sent into space today strapped into its seat.
Press TV

Iranian state TV says that nation today successfully launched a "living creature into space."

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Mon January 28, 2013

In Egypt: Protests Continue, Opposition Balks At Talks With Morsi

Mourners shouted during a funeral procession today in Port Said, Egypt, for some of those killed during Saturday's protests.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:15 am

A fifth day of "widening unrest," as The New York Times puts it, is underway in Egypt.

Clashes continue, Merrit Kennedy reports from Cairo for the NPR Newscast, even though President Mohammed Morsi has declared a 30-day state of emergency and night curfews in three provinces.

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The Two-Way
7:39 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Brazilian Nightclub Disaster: Toxic Smoke, Barriers Blamed For Horrible Toll

Mourners at the coffin of one victim of the fire at the Kiss nightclub in southern Brazil.
Marcelo Sayao EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:59 am

Survivors and authorities are telling harrowing tales of what it was like early Sunday inside the Kiss nightclub in the southern Brazilian city of Santa Maria, where more than 230 people died as a fire swept through the building.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Mon January 28, 2013

'Path To Citizenship' Part Of Senators' Bipartisan Immigration Plan

Air interdiction agent Jake Linde in 2010, on the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 4:03 pm

  • From the NPR Newscast: Jim Hawk reports

Saying their proposal would "secure the border, modernize and streamline our current legal immigration system" and create "a tough but fair legalization program for individuals who are currently here," eight senators unveiled a "bipartisan framework for comprehensive immigration reform."

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Mon January 28, 2013

French And Malian Forces Take Airport In Timbuktu; Islamists Burn Library

A French soldier in central Mali on Sunday.
Nic Bothma EPA /LANDOV

While French and Malian forces have taken control of Timbuktu's airport in what NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports may be a turning point in their fight against Islamist extremists, there's also word that before the Islamists fled the ancient city they set fire to a library that holds "thousands of priceless ancient manuscripts."

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Around the Nation
6:50 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Happy National Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:39 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Corporate Naming Rights For Buildings Proposed

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with a chance to get your name in stone. A lawmaker in Washington State proposed a way to make extra money: sell corporate naming rights to public buildings. It already happens with sports venues: the Mariners play at Safeco Field. Now, if this plan were to become law, kids could attend Nintendo Elementary School. Or they could drink from the Budweiser Water Tower. People in trouble with the law would of course make an appearance at the Enron Courthouse.

It's MORNING EDITION.

Middle East
5:00 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Syrian Opposition Fears Waning Western Support

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's talk next about the uprising in Syria, where many people are asking, what happened to the United States? The U.S. promised practical help to the Syrian opposition, but NPR's Deborah Amos reports that help has not arrived.

DEBORAH AMOS, BYLINE: This was the scene last month in Morocco, at the Friends of Syria meeting. The Obama administration recognized the Syrian National Coalition; so have 130 other nations.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

WILLIAM BURNS: Good afternoon, everyone.

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NPR Story
4:55 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Bipartisan Group Agrees To Overhauling Immigration

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

We have a clearer picture this morning of just what an immigration overhaul might look like.

INSKEEP: A bipartisan group of senators is spreading word that they have agreed on principles for change.

MONTAGNE: The proposal would include a pathway to citizen for millions of people now in the U.S. illegally. Republicans have led the opposition to that change, up to now, commonly calling it amnesty.

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NPR Story
4:55 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Journalist Stanley Karnow Dies At 87

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

You know, when I was a teenager, I got interested in the Vietnam War. And I found a book in the library, called "Vietnam: A History." It turned out that that searing story of one of America's most tragic wars, was the product of one of the most distinguished reporters in Southeast Asia.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:55 am
Mon January 28, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is, fly like an eagle. Maybe you've seen this viral video. It's of a golden eagle swooping down and snatching up a baby in a park. The bird carries the kid a few feet before dropping him and flying away.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It caused quite a stir online - horrifying many, many viewers before it was revealed as a hoax. The video was a project made by students at a 3-D animation and design school in Montreal.

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Digital Life
2:34 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Google Posts How It Handles Requests For Users' Data

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:11 am

Google wants you to know you're being watched. Or rather, the company wants you to know how and when the police get to watch what you do online.

For the first time, the company has posted its policies for when it gives up users' information to the government. It's part of a broader company strategy to push for tougher privacy laws.

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Business
2:33 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Beyond Portlandia: Subaru Drives For America's Heartland

Subaru, known for its success in Denver, the Pacific Northwest and the Northeast, aims to expand its market to Texas and Tennessee.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:11 am

The car market in the U.S. is at its most competitive. Not only are big companies like General Motors and Toyota slugging it out, but in order to survive, small-niche players like Subaru also are trying to push into the mainstream.

The Japanese carmaker is popular in Denver, the Pacific Northwest and the Northeast. Now Subaru has its sights on Texas and Tennessee.

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The Salt
2:31 am
Mon January 28, 2013

How One Man Tried To Slim Down Big Soda From The Inside

PepsiCo's product line ranges from salty chips and its sugary namesake drink to more healthful fare like hummus and yogurt. In 2010, the company announced plans to cut sugar, fat and sodium in its products to address health and nutrition concerns.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 7:42 am

Many big food companies are caught in a dilemma these days. They want to rebrand themselves as merchants of health — Coca-Cola's new anti-obesity ads are just the latest example — but many of their profits still come from products that make nutritionists scowl.

If there's one person who symbolizes this tension, it's Derek Yach.

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Africa
2:30 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Egypt's Salafis Emerge As Powerful And Controversial Political Force

A protester holds a Quran at a Salafi rally for the enforcement of Islamic Shariah law last fall in Cairo's Tahrir Square. Repressed during the rule of President Hosni Mubarak, the country's ultra-conservative Salafis have seen a resurgence since the Arab Spring uprising.
Mohamed Abd El Ghany Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:11 am

The uprisings of the Arab Spring unleashed a new political force in the region — Salafis. These ultra-conservative Muslims aspire to a society ruled entirely by a rigid form of Islamic law. Their models are the salaf, or ancestors, referring to the earliest Muslims who lived during the lifetime of the Prophet Muhammad.

To their critics, the Salafis are religious fanatics who are trying to drag the region back to 7th-century Arabia. But the Salafis maintain that they are offering the purest alternative to the dictatorships that have long dominated the region.

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Around the Nation
2:29 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Hemp Gets The Green Light In New Colorado Pot Measure

Hemp products for sale in Washington, D.C., in 2010. The U.S. is the world's largest consumer of hemp products, although growing hemp is illegal under federal law. Colorado recently passed a measure that legalizes growing hemp.
Tim Sloan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 9:13 am

With recreational marijuana now legal in Colorado, small-scale pot shops will open up soon in places like Denver and Boulder. But that's not the only business that could get a boost: Large-scale commercial farmers may also be in line to benefit.

Why? When Colorado voters legalized marijuana last November, they also legalized hemp.

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Shots - Health News
2:25 am
Mon January 28, 2013

No Mercy For Robots: Experiment Tests How Humans Relate To Machines

Could you say "no" to this face? Christoph Bartneck of the University of Canterbury in New Zealand recently tested whether humans could end the life of a robot as it pleaded for survival.
Christoph Bartneck

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 4:15 pm

In 2007, Christoph Bartneck, a robotics professor at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, decided to stage an experiment loosely based on the famous (and infamous) Milgram obedience study.

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