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The Salt
2:33 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Jerusalem: A Love Letter To Food And Memories Of Home

A boy chooses fruit from a stall as Jerusalem market vendors swirl around him.
Jonathan Lovekin Ten Speed Press

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 5:46 pm

Jerusalem is known for its bitter politics, a divided city where decades of religious and political strife have torn away shared spaces. But as British-Israeli chef Yotam Ottolenghi tells NPR's Melissa Block, if there's one place in which Jerusalemites of all stripes still stand united, it's in their love of food.

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The Two-Way
2:19 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Citizen Scientists Discover A Strange Planet In Four-Star System

An artist's illustration of PH1, a planet discovered by volunteers from the Planet Hunters citizen science project. PH1, shown in the foreground, is a circumbinary planet and orbits two suns.
Haven Giguere Yale

The universe continues to surprise us. Two citizen scientists have discovered a very rare world: A planet that orbits two stars and has a second pair of stars revolving around it.

Wired explains just how odd this is:

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The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

For About $20, Cardboard Bicycle Could 'Change The World,' Inventor Says

Israeli inventor and his cardboard bicycle.
Baz Ratner Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 2:53 pm

Reuters today catches up on a story that's been getting some traction in recent weeks:

An Israeli inventor has come up with a way to make a bicycle almost entirely out of cardboard — and so inexpensively that he thinks retailers would only need to charge about $20 for one.

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Movie Interviews
1:26 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Tyler Perry Transforms: From Madea To Family Man

Tyler Perry is currently starring in the new action thriller Alex Cross, which opens in theaters on Friday.
Sidney Baldwin 2012 Summit Entertainment LLC

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:40 pm

Whenever Tyler Perry is in front of the camera, he's usually behind it as well. A screenwriter, director, producer and star, Perry grew up poor in New Orleans, but he has become a movie phenomenon — he was described in the New Yorker as the most financially successful black man the American film industry has ever known.

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Remembrances
1:12 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

'Killing Fields' Author Remembers Cambodian King

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 3:05 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Few stories in the 20th century are more tragic than the fate of Cambodia, a small, peaceful country on the sidelines of the war in Vietnam. Cambodia would be invaded by both sides, carpet-bombed by the United States, taken over by murderous Maoists, invaded again by the Vietnamese and left to wither for a decade by a grotesque, international impasse.

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Politics
12:49 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

How Much Power Does The President Really Have?

In three weeks, millions of Americans cast their vote for president in an election that both campaigns depict as a stark choice between two fundamentally different visions for the country. But the chief executive's power is limited in real ways, by Congress, foreign interests, and other players.

Law
12:49 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

CIA's Ex-Con Code Thief Reflects On His Career

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:49 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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On Aging
12:49 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Taking The Car Keys Away From Older Drivers

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:24 pm

For older drivers and their families, the conversation about giving up the car keys can be wrenching. Driving, for many, means independence and the transition to life without a car can be challenging, particularly for those who live alone or in areas with limited access to public transportation.

The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Report: Probe Of Rep. Jesse Jackson Focuses On Use Of Campaign Funds

Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., on the steps of the U.S. Capitol in December 2011.
Yuri Gripas Reuters /Landov

The Chicago Sun-Times broke the news late last week that Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., is "the target of a federal investigation into 'suspicious activity' into his congressional finances."

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The Two-Way
12:04 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Fair Game: Wolf Hunting Begins In Wisconsin, Minnesota

A timber wolf named Comet is seen at the Timber Wolf Preservation Society in Greendale, Wis. Federal officials removed Great Lakes wolves from the endangered species list in January.
Carrie Antlfinger AP

The wolf enters a different era in Wisconsin, today, and Minnesota later this fall: For the first time in recent history, hunters in those two states will be allowed to bait, shoot and trap wolves.

The Green Bay Press Gazette reports that the move comes after the Federal government "removed Great Lakes wolves from the endangered species list in January."

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Music Reviews
11:59 am
Mon October 15, 2012

More Than This: The 'Complete' Roxy Music

Roxy Music's eight studio albums are now collected in one box set, titled The Complete Studio Recordings 1972-1982.
Keystone Hulton Archive

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:40 pm

Roxy Music's eight studio albums have just been collected in one box set, titled The Complete Studio Recordings 1972-1982.

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It's All Politics
11:41 am
Mon October 15, 2012

The Not-So-Great Communicator: Is Obama Overrated As A Speaker?

President Obama speaks to supporters last month during a campaign stop in Las Vegas.
Isaac Brekken Getty Images

For a man who was elected president partly on his ability to give a great speech, Barack Obama has been at times a surprisingly poor communicator in office and on the campaign trail.

That may have been most evident earlier this month during the first presidential debate. But Obama generally hasn't been as impressive at getting his message across in his four years in the White House as he was during the campaign that put him there.

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The Two-Way
11:29 am
Mon October 15, 2012

NOAA: Around World, September Tied Record For Warmest Temperatures

The redder the shading, the further above average were the temperatures in September.
NOAA's National Climatic Data Center

This chart offers another perspective on just how warm it was around the world last month, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says.

The agency has been keeping records since 1880 and the "average combined global land and ocean surface temperature for September 2012 tied with 2005 as the warmest September on record."

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Shots - Health Blog
11:05 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Brain Scientists Uncover New Links Between Stress And Depression

Scientists say they're learning more about how to keep stress from damaging mental health.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 12:10 pm

Even extreme stress doesn't have to get you down.

That's the message from brain scientists studying the relationship between stress and problems such as depression, anxiety and post traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.

Researchers at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in New Orleans presented studies showing how stress caused by everything from battlefield trauma to bullying can alter brain circuitry in ways that have long-term effects on mental health.

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Around the Nation
10:53 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Finding Documents After Years Living Under Radar

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And speaking of dreams, the Obama Administration says its high profile immigration initiative is intended to preserve the dreams of a large group of young immigrants. The program is called the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Initiative.

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Politics
10:53 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Chicano Activist Sees Dream Live On In Her Sons

Rosie Castro was a Mexican-American civil rights activist during the 1970s. She passed down her passion for change to her children: Texas State Representative Joaquin Castro and San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro. For Hispanic Heritage Month, Rosie Castro speaks with host Michel Martin about the Chicano movement and raising her twin sons.

Election 2012
10:53 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Which Polls To Believe As Election Nears?

A poll out from ABC News and The Washington Post on Monday, shows President Obama with a slight edge over GOP nominee Mitt Romney. As the candidates head into Tuesday night's debate, host Michel Martin gets the latest on election news from Republican strategist Ron Christie and Corey Ealons, a former Obama White House advisor.

It's All Politics
10:28 am
Mon October 15, 2012

What They're Saying In Swing Counties

Voting stickers at the Miami-Dade County elections office on Oct. 10. A study of online conversations finds that voters in the large, diverse county are discussing issues differently from those in other parts of Florida.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 10:46 am

Last week, we discussed state-by-state differences in online conversations around the issue of unemployment. That analysis of millions of words from news posts, blogs and user comments showed how the conversation in the swing states of Florida, Ohio and Virginia varies greatly because of cultural and socioeconomic factors.

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Books
9:20 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Some Book! 'Charlotte's Web' Turns 60

Sixty years ago, the book Charlotte's Web first appeared in print. This children's classic is often seen as a story of a spider and a pig. But when E.B. White recorded a narration of the book, he said something different: "This is a story of the barn. I wrote it for children, and to amuse myself."

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The Two-Way
9:11 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Mystery Solved: 'Softball-Sized Eyeball' Likely Belongs To A Swordfish

Quite a baby blue.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:15 am

We learned two things this morning: First, experts from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission believe that the softball-sized eyeball that washed up in Pompano Beach, Fla. belongs to a swordfish.

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The Salt
8:59 am
Mon October 15, 2012

A Nose Tuned In To Bitter May Help Stave Off Sinus Infection

If you're a supertaster with a nose for bitter flavors, scientists say you might be good at fighting sinus infections.
iStockphoto.com

Supertasters are the Olympic athletes of gastronomy, able to detect subtle differences in flavors that other people never register. That talent may make for more than a discriminating palate, though. It may also warn them about attacking germs, and help them defend themselves against sinus infection.

This notion isn't as bizarre as it may seem. Bitter tastes have long been considered a danger signal in foods, warning about potential toxins in potatoes and other vegetables. If the potato's bitter, don't eat it.

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The Two-Way
8:54 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Scotland Set To Vote On Independence In 2014

Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond and Prime Minister David Cameron shake hands after signing an Independence Referendum deal in Edinburgh, Scotland.
Ian MacNicol Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:31 am

In what's being called a "historic agreement," Prime Minister David Cameron and First Minister Alex Salmond have hammered out a deal will allow Scotland to decide if it wants to secede from the United Kingdom. The question will be settled in a 2014 referendum.

The AP reports:

"Officials from London and Edinburgh have been meeting for weeks to hammer out details of a vote on Scottish independence. Sticking points included the date and the wording of the question. ...

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Monkey See
8:23 am
Mon October 15, 2012

A Day Later, The Space Jump Guy Is OK, But How About The Rest Of Us?

Felix Baumgartner of Austria as he jumps out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos on Sunday.
Red Bull Stratos AP

More than 7 million people were watching as Felix Baumgartner sat at the edge of his space capsule yesterday 24 miles off the ground and got ready to jump, in what was known as the "Red Bull Stratos" project, better known as the "space jump." I saw it myself; he opened the door, and there was something there that certainly seemed to be space.

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The Two-Way
7:51 am
Mon October 15, 2012

VIDEO: A Skydive From The Edge Of Space

Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria and technical project director Art Thompson celebrate after Baumgartner completed a skydive from the stratosphere Sunday.
Joerg Mitter AP

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The Two-Way
7:22 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Malala, 15-Year-Old Pakistani Girl Shot By Taliban, Airlifted To Britain

Malala Yousafzai in March 2012.
T. Mughal EPA /LANDOV

Malala, the 15-year-old shot in the head by the Taliban, has been airlifted to Britain, the Pakistani government said in a press release today.

The government said that they were "pleased with her present condition, which has been described as optimal."

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Japanese Mobile Carrier Softbank To Buy Majority Stake In Sprint Nextel

After days of rumors, the Japanese telecom Softbank announced it would buy a 70 percent stake of the American mobile carrier Sprint Nextel.

Two reasons this is important: Sprint had been overshadowed by mega companies Verizon and AT&T. When T-Mobile announced a merger with Mobile PCS, Sprint was left in a kind of nowhere land.

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It's All Politics
6:56 am
Mon October 15, 2012

A Fighter To The End, Arlen Specter Seemed To Thrive On Controversy

Sen. Arlen Specter speaks to the media at the base of Air Force One in Maryland in 2010. Specter died Sunday at the age of 82.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 7:39 am

Imagine a lawyer's lawyer, a fighter's fighter and a pol's pol. Now imagine one person as all three. That was Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, who died Sunday at age 82.

Over the course of three decades in the U.S. Senate (1981-2011), Specter came to personify the pragmatic, independent operator who sized up the substance and politics of every issue for himself. His vote could be one of the hardest to get, and often the one that made the difference.

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History
6:50 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Is The Nobel Prize A Boys Mostly Club?

Tawakkol Karman, a 2011 Nobel Peace Prize winner, is one of few women in the ranks of Nobel laureates.
Donnelly Marks Courtesy of Nobel Media

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:04 am

As the last of this year's Nobel Prize winners are announced and media focus shifts away from Sweden, two things are clear about the winners.

One: They have all done laudatory work in their respective fields.

Two: Aside from the European Union, which was awarded the Peace Prize, all of this year's Nobel laureates are men.

They join the ranks of hundreds of people who have received the awards over the past 111 years. But what is surprising about the list of Nobel laureates is just how few women are on it.

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Americans Roth, Shapely Win Nobel Prize For Economics

Lloyd S. Shapley.
Nobel Prize

Two Americans took the Nobel prize for economics this morning.

Alvin E. Roth, of Harvard University, and Lloyd S. Shapley, of University of California, Los Angeles, were given the award "for the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design."

If that doesn't mean anything to you, the Nobel committee explained that their work essentially explained an important economic problem: How can different economic actors find each other.

They explain:

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Around the Nation
6:06 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Iowa Baby's Birth Is One For Number Lovers

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 6:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Katie Deremiah and Ron Fitzgerald of Des Moines, Iowa thought it was cool when their son was born on September 10th last year, offering the fun sequence: 9, 10, 11. Last week, they had a daughter, weighing 8 pounds, 9 ounces. Attention numerologists - little Laila was born on October 12th at military time 13:14, outnumbering her big brother at 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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