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The Two-Way
3:06 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

South Africa's First Black Billionaire Pledges To Donate Half His Wealth

Patrice Motsepe in 2010.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 5:41 pm

If you were looking for good news, here's a bit of it from South Africa: Patrice Motsepe, the country's first black billionaire, announced today that he will donate half his fortune in order to help the poor.

Reuters reports:

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Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Bellevue Hospital's Slow Comeback After Superstorm Sandy

When Superstorm Sandy came ashore, Bellevue Hospital was quickly submerged. Inspectors from the Federal Emergency Management Agency marked the flood line in the basement with orange tape or spray paint. In some areas, water was 14 feet deep.
Fred Mogul NPR

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 5:18 pm

When a ferry crashed in lower Manhattan earlier this month, ambulances took dozens of people to hospitals around the island.

Bellevue Hospital took in 31 passengers, but they all had minor injuries. The most seriously hurt patients from the crash went elsewhere. Dr. Suzi Vassallo said that's because Bellevue still can't handle serious traumatic injuries.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Israel Bombs Military Target Outside Damascus, Syria Says

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 6:38 pm

Israel's air force bombed a military facility in western Syria, the Syrian media said Wednesday, a development that could further complicate the already volatile conditions in the region.

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Books
2:51 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Sotomayor's Memoir Already A Best-Seller

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 2:27 pm

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor's memoir is riding high, topping the New York Times best-seller list in its first week of sales.

My Beloved World, Sotomayor's account of her path from the tenements of the Bronx to the U.S. Supreme Court, is on track to outdistance even the best-selling books of other justices.

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Music Reviews
2:27 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

A 1969 Bootleg Unearths Miles Davis' 'Lost' Quintet

Miles Davis' Live in Europe 1969: The Bootleg Series Vol. 2 is a compilation of previously unreleased material performed by a short-lived incarnation of his touring band.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 5:18 pm

After a slew of multidisc sets devoted to key points in the career of Miles Davis, you'd think Columbia Records would have unearthed every speck of consequential music by now. But not quite.

This week, Columbia brings out Live in Europe 1969: The Bootleg Series Vol. 2 — a three-CD, one-DVD set devoted to the jazz maverick's "lost" quintet, his touring band from 1969.

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The Two-Way
1:54 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Report From Homeland Security Details 'Commonalities' In Mass Shootings

Mourners create a memorial at the fountain of the Aurora Municipal Center after a prayer vigil Sunday for the 12 victims of Friday's mass shooting at the Century 16 movie theater.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Back in November, one of the Homeland Security's intelligence analysis centers in New Jersey was tasked with finding "commonalities" of mass shootings in the United States.

Today, the website Public Intelligence received an unclassified version of that report through a Freedom of Information Act request. The New Jersey "Fusion Center" looked at 29 mass shootings in the United States since 1999.

The findings:

-- Nearly half of the shootings happened at a workplace.

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World
1:41 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Israeli Election Rekindles Debate Over Military Service

Ultra-Orthodox Jews are not required to perform military service in Israel, and the issue is subject to intense debate following the country's election last week. Here, ultra-Orthodox men sign up for alternate civilian service earlier this month.
Baz Ratner Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 11:51 am

The rise of a new Israeli political party after last week's elections has set the stage for renewed conflict over the country's military draft.

That new party, Yesh Atid, or "There is a Future," campaigned on a promise to draft thousands of ultra-Orthodox students who are currently exempt from military service.

And with the number of ultra-Orthodox students in Israel on the rise given the community's high birth rates, this longstanding debate has become a critical post-election issue.

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Around the Nation
1:41 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Boy Scouts' Repeal Of Gay Ban Mirrors Its Approach To Racial Integration

The Supreme Court upheld the Boy Scouts' right to discriminate in 2000, but the issue roiled for years after. Scott Cozza (right) leads a protest outside the National Council Conference of the Boy Scouts of America in Philadelphia in 2003.
Mark Stehle AP

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 6:10 pm

As Boy Scouts of America mull over whether to allow gay members to openly join, their approach might mirror the leave-it-to-the-locals tack the organization once took in deciding how to tackle the issue of desegregating its Scout troops.

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It's All Politics
1:40 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Lifting Boy Scout Ban On Gays: One Legal Perspective

A statue of a Boy Scout stands in front of the National Scouting Museum in Irving, Texas.
LM Otero AP

The Boy Scouts of America as early as next week may drop its ban against openly gay members and leaders, just a dozen years after it successfully took its fight to maintain the policy all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

It would mark a seismic shift for the organization, which counts more than 3.3 million youth members who participate in troops largely sponsored by civic and church groups.

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Mental Health
1:23 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Balancing Work, Medication And Mental Illness

With a proper balance of medication and therapy, some people diagnosed with mental illness can succeed in the workplace.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 5:04 pm

Thirty years ago, when Elyn Saks was diagnosed with schizophrenia, her doctors told her she would never be able to hold a job.

"The idea was that I should lower my expectations," she tells NPR's Neal Conan. "I was advised to be a cashier for a year or two and then think about another job or possibly going back to school."

She didn't listen.

Despite hospitalization, years of psychoanalysis and continued delusions, Saks discovered that work was essential to managing her psychosis. She is now a professor at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law.

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Asia
1:20 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

The Role For The U.S. In The East China Sea Dispute

The Senkaku Islands, as they are called in Japan, sit in a strategic location between Okinawa and Taiwan.
Matt Stiles/NPR

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 2:57 pm

The dispute between Japan and China over small islands in the East China Sea is escalating. The two nations first dispatched unarmed vessels to stake their claims, then patrol boats, and then, unarmed aircraft.

Most recently, both countries sent fighter jets to the islands — known as the Senkaku in Japan, and the Diaoyu in China. The islands are uninhabited, but sit in a strategic location between Japan and Taiwan.

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Politics
1:07 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Immigration, Gun Legislation And The Shakeup In Iowa

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 1:27 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. An African-American governor appoints an African-American senator; immigration moves to the front burner, and Bobby Jindal scolds the GOP. It's Wednesday and time for a...

GOVERNOR BOBBY JINDAL: The stupid party...

CONAN: Edition of the Political Junkie.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDINGS)

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Severe Weather Moves East; Tornado Overturns Vehicles In Georgia

A radar image showing a strong line of storms moving across eastern United States.
NOAA

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 4:44 pm

"The intense storm system that brought severe weather to the Mississippi Valley on Tuesday will move eastward on Wednesday, bringing a risk of severe weather from the upper Ohio Valley southward to the central Gulf Coast and eastward to the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast coast," the National Weather Service warns this hours. "The main threat will be damaging wind along with the possibility of tornadoes, especially across eastern Ala. into western Ga."

In Georgia, a tornado has already touched down. WSB-TV has dramatic video of the funnel cloud raking through Adairsville, Ga.:

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It's All Politics
12:16 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Rubio's New York Admirer Isn't Exactly Welcome

Anyone else noticing the love New York Senator Charles Schumer is showing for Marco Rubio? He's been calling Rubio courageous for pushing an immigration overhaul that many in his party's base despise. Wednesday morning he likened Rubio's appearance on conservative talk shows to "Daniel in the lion's den."

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The Two-Way
11:59 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Pennsylvania Judge Denies Sandusky Request For New Trial

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky as he walked into his sentencing hearing in October.
Patrick Smith Getty Images

A Pennsylvania judge on Wednesday denied a motion by former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky for a new trial.

Sandusky was convicted of 45 counts of sexual abuse of minors back in October. He was sentenced to a minimum of 30 years in jail.

Michael Sisak of the The Citizens' Voice in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., reports on Twitter:

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Music Reviews
11:51 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Paloma Faith's 'Fall To Grace' Is A Keeper

Singer-songwriter and actress Paloma Faith's new album is titled Fall to Grace.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 3:22 pm

In culling through albums released late last year that I still play with pleasure, Paloma Faith's Fall to Grace was a real keeper. In contrast to my joy, Faith was singing about her agony: her broken heart, her wracked sobs about ruined affairs, her choked goodbyes to lovers who'd left her. She made all this sound tremendously intense and exciting. Not for nothing did she title her previous album Do You Want the Truth or Something Beautiful?

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Television
11:38 am
Wed January 30, 2013

'House Of Cards' Is Built To Last

Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright star in the new Netflix original series House of Cards, which premieres Feb. 1.
Patrick Harbron Netflix

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 8:06 am

This week brings two new high-profile drama series. One is The Americans, premiering Jan. 30 on the FX network; it's about sleeper KGB agents living in the U.S. during the Reagan era. The other is House of Cards, a new series premiering Feb. 1.

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The Two-Way
11:34 am
Wed January 30, 2013

BlackBerry Maker Unveils New Phones, New Corporate Name

A member of the RIM team poses with one of the new touchscreen Z10 Blackberry devices.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

It's no secret that Research In Motion is in trouble. The tablet device it released in 2011 did so poorly the company took a $485 million hit. Android phones and Apple's iPhone have left the company in the technology graveyard.

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Television
11:18 am
Wed January 30, 2013

William H. Macy Is 'Shameless' On Showtime

In Shameless, William H. Macy is the dysfunctional father of six.
Cliff Lipson Cliff Lipson/SHOWTIME

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 1:05 pm

William H. Macy is the first to admit that he has played his fair share of losers. His latest role, as the alcoholic, narcissist Frank Gallagher — the single dad of a dysfunctional six-kid family — on the Showtime series Shameless, adds to the list of hapless characters Macy has portrayed on screen and stage.

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The Salt
11:10 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Ukrainian Comfort Dish Chicken Kiev Claims French Parentage

Chicken Kiev made by Viacheslav Gribov, head chef at Kiev's Hotel Dnipro, comes with a small bone sticking out one end. If done properly, some of the butter inside will remain unmelted.
Amy Guttman

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 12:38 pm

You'd be forgiven for thinking chicken Kiev got its start in the Ukrainian capital. After all, a hearty dish of chicken filled with butter, wrapped in bread crumbs, and deep fried is the perfect meal to withstand subzero temperatures and cold winds blowing across the Dniepr River.

Ukrainian chefs say they have the only authentic recipe for the dish, but they concede that chicken Kiev, despite its name, has a far more sophisticated provenance: It's French.

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Wisdom Watch
11:04 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Before Michelle Obama, There Was Ella Jenkins

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 4:39 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Now, we want to tell you about a performer who may have been a big part of your life when you were still in short pants, if I can use that expression.

Before there were OzoKidz and Raffi filling packed houses, there was Ella Jenkins. For more than 50 years, she's been using the power of song to educate children and teach them lessons about life and the importance of staying active.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "STOP AND GO")

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Politics
11:02 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Immigration: Did Senators Get It Right?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. An estimated 11 million people live in the U.S. without documentation. During the 2012 election, voters urged both major political parties to do something about what's often called our broken immigration system.

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Economy
9:44 am
Wed January 30, 2013

In 4th Quarter, Economy Shrank For First Time Since '09

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, with Renee Montagne. Good morning.

Let's try again, shall we, to explain what it means when we hear that the U.S. economy shrank in the fourth quarter of 2012. As we've discussed elsewhere in the program, the decline was slight - just one-tenth of a percentage point - but it is the first contraction of the economy since the Great Recession officially ended in 2009. NPR's Jim Zarroli is with us once again in New York. Jim, good morning.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: Good morning.

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It's All Politics
9:43 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Disgraced Former Gov. Mark Sanford's Ready To Make Another Move

Mark Sanford, seen at the GOP convention last summer in Tampa, Fla., saw his career as South Carolina's governor implode in 2009 when he admitted to an extramarital affair.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 10:16 am

Can Mark Sanford make a comeback? Right now, it appears quite possible.

The Republican ended his career as South Carolina's governor in disgrace after revealing in 2009 that he'd been surreptitiously spending time in Argentina visiting his mistress. But Sanford now hopes to return to his first job in politics, representing coastal South Carolina in the House.

"As soon as Sanford jumped in, he was the presumptive front-runner, simply because of his money and name recognition," says Scott Huffmon, a pollster based at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C.

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Shots - Health News
9:25 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Did Penicillin, Rather Than The Pill, Usher In Age Of Love?

Would Woodstock have happened without penicillin?
AP

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 4:28 pm

We all know what fueled the sexual revolution: birth control and rock 'n' roll.

But what if that's not the whole story? What if America's libido was liberated not by the pill and heady doses of Jim Morrison, but by the lowly prescription drug penicillin.

Before penicillin was found to be effective against syphilis during World War II, sex brought with it the risk of syphilis, a disease that can cause blindness, dementia and paralysis.

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The Two-Way
8:08 am
Wed January 30, 2013

192,000 Jobs Added To Payrolls This Month, Report Signals

Looking for work: In Birmingham, Ala., last summer, Jessica McQueen (left) and Ashley Abramson were among those filling out applications at a jobs fair.
Joe Songer Birmingham News /Landov

After bad news about late 2012 — that the U.S. economy shrank a bit in the fourth quarter — there's modestly good news about early 2013:

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The Two-Way
7:48 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Economy Shrank At 0.1 Percent Annual Rate In Fourth Quarter

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 8:11 am

The U.S. economy shrank at a 0.1 percent annual rate in the fourth quarter, the Bureau of Economic Analysis reports, its first quarterly contraction since the second quarter of 2009.

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The Two-Way
7:15 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Report: Your Salary Data May Be For Sale

Fill out an application for a loan, and your wage history may go places you didn't expect.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 5:42 pm

If you've earned a paycheck in recent years, you'll probably want want to know about this:

The Equifax credit reporting agency, NBC News reports, has collected 190 million employment and salary records on about one-third of U.S. adults and has sold some of the information "to debt collectors, financial service companies and other entities."

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Around the Nation
7:00 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Gnomes Allowed To Stay On Utility Poles

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with gnomes in the news. This time, about 2,300 tiny paintings of gnomes have appeared on utility poles all over Oakland, California. Since the little guys showed up last year, full-sized residents got into the spirit - blogging and tweeting new sightings. Pacific Gas and Electric was going to evict the bearded figures, but when the anonymous artist appealed, PG&E backed off. Yesterday it declared the poles gnome-man's-land. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:50 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Seagull Attacks A Vatican's Dove Of Peace

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

The Caravan of Peace is an annual march at the Vatican. As Pope Benedict looked on, two doves, symbolizing peace, were released into St. Peter's Square. It was beautiful until a seagull assaulted one of the doves. Time magazine got one of the finest headlines ever seen outside The Onion: Pope's Dove of Peace Attacked by Seagull of Irony. But the symbolism grew deeper when the surprisingly tough Dove of Peace fought off the much larger seagull.

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