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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Ricin Suspect Dutschke Makes A Quick Visit To Federal Court

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 1:05 pm

The man accused of sending letters containing the poison ricin to President Obama and other officials made a brief appearance in an Oxford, Miss., federal court Monday morning. J. Everett Dutschke, 41, was arrested Saturday, several days after another Mississippi man, former suspect Paul Kevin Curtis, was released.

Dutschke is charged with possessing a biological weapon, identified as ricin, and attempting to use it as a weapon. If convicted, he could face a sentence of life in prison.

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The Two-Way
10:47 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Crazy Photo: Reporter Snaps Pic As Baseball Nearly Beans Her

That's a baseball zooming in behind Kelly Nash's head. The image is from Nash's Instagram account, with her permission.
@KNashSports

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 11:40 am

When Fox Sun Sports reporter Kelly Nash was at Fenway Park in Boston on Saturday to cover the Houston Astros' game with the Red Sox, she decided to take a few "selfie" photos while atop the famous Green Monster in left field.

Below, batting practice was underway. So some balls were flying in her direction. Nash turned her back to the field, held her smartphone up and started snapping.

And when she looked at one of the photos she'd just taken, Nash says, she discovered she'd come much closer to being beaned than she'd realized.

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Mon April 29, 2013

At Holocaust Museum, Clinton And Wiesel Urge Young To Remember

In the Hall of Remembrance at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, visitors can light candles in memory of the 6 million Jews killed by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 10:59 am

"You are our witnesses because you will go beyond our lives," Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel told the world's young people Monday morning during an event to mark the 20th anniversary of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum's opening.

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The Two-Way
10:31 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Netherlands Prepares To Welcome First King Since 1890

Tourists in Amsterdam wear orange Monday, one day before the investiture of the new Dutch king. Queen Beatrix, who ruled the Netherlands for 33 years, announced her abdication from the throne earlier this year.
Marcel Antonisse AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 6:19 am

Excitement is building in the Netherlands a day before Crown Prince Willem-Alexander will be named king. Queen Beatrix will abdicate the throne Tuesday, and when the prince is sworn in, he'll become the first Dutch king in 122 years.

The transition will take place April 30, a national holiday known as Queen's Day — a busy holiday in any year in the Netherlands and especially popular in 2013. It will be renamed King's Day during the reign of Willem-Alexander, and moved to April 27, the new king's birthday.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Top Stories: 'Misha' Speaks; Manchin Predicts Gun Bill Win

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 8:51 am

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The Two-Way
8:20 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Bangladesh Rescuers Give Up On Finding Survivors Of Collapse

Bangladeshi rescue workers take a break Friday on the rubble of a building that collapsed Wednesday in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh. By Friday, the death toll reached 300 as rescuers continued to search for injured and missing.
Kevin Frayer AP

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 6:57 pm

Several arrests have been made in connection with the collapse of an illegally constructed garment factory in Bangladesh last week that killed at least 380 people outside the capital, Dhaka. Meanwhile, rescuers say they have given up hope of finding anyone else alive.

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Shots - Health News
8:12 am
Mon April 29, 2013

If Military Covers Abortion After Rape, Why Not The Peace Corps?

Last year, something surprising happened: A piece of legislation about abortion made it through both chambers of Congress and was signed into law by President Obama.

It was a law providing insurance coverage for abortion for military women in the case of rape or incest. The bipartisan support enjoyed by the military trumped politics as usual, which generally holds that Republicans and Democrats have to fight over anything involving abortion.

But will the women who volunteer for the Peace Corps inspire a similar truce on the same issue?

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The Two-Way
7:50 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Tim Tebow Cut By NFL's Jets

He'll have to find a new team now: Then-New York Jets backup quarterback Tim Tebow on the sidelines during a game last December. The team cut him from its roster on Monday.
John Angelillo UPI /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 8:54 am

In 2011, he was the hottest name in football, for his "Tebowing" and for leading the Denver Broncos into the playoffs.

Before the 2012 season, he was traded to the New York Jets — putting him smack dab in the center of the brightest of the media's spotlights.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Mon April 29, 2013

I Would Have Stopped Him, 'Misha' Says Of Bombing Suspect

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, as seen in a video taken on April 15 near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.
FBI.gov

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 5:32 pm

The man known as Misha who relatives of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects have alleged may have turned the elder Tsarnaev brother toward a radical form of Islam says he did no such thing and would have tried to stop the attack if he had known about it.

"I wasn't his teacher," Mikhail Allakhverdov (Misha) said Sunday of Tamerlan Tsarnaev. "If I had been his teacher, I would have made sure he never did anything like this."

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The Two-Way
6:27 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Book News: Feminist Icon Mary Thom Dies In Motorcycle Crash

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
6:12 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Gas Leak Suspected After Dozens Injured By Blast In Prague

Glass and other debris were scattered across the street Monday after an explosion in Prague. Authorities initially suspected a gas leak. Dozens of people were injured in the Czech capital.
Martin Mraz EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 7:34 am

An explosion at an office building in the the Czech capital on Monday injured at least several dozen people and may have left some victims trapped in rubble.

The early thinking was that a natural gas leak led to the disaster in the center of Prague, police spokesman Tomas Hulan said, according to The Associated Press.

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Europe
6:03 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Baby Captures Spanish Villagers' Attention

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 7:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. There's a baby boom in Los Giles, Spain, consisting of one. Baby Inara arrived three weeks ago, the first child to be born there in 45 years. At last count, the village had about 60 residents, all aging. But the first-time parents of Inara had moved back to the village to raise their child near grandparents. Now thinkspain.com reports nearly everyone in town has held her. So it really does take a village. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:53 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Pitino Keeps Promise, Gets Tattoo

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 7:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Once Louisville won the NCAA men's basketball title, there was only one thing for Rick Pitino to do. He promised his players that if they won, he'd get a tattoo. We do not know if Pitino had second thoughts in the final seconds of the win over Michigan, but now the coach has done it. A Louisville spokesman tweeted a photo of the 60-year-old coach's back. It is now marked with the team record, 35-and-five, along with a blood-red letter L.

The Two-Way
5:46 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Sen. Manchin Says Background Checks Bill Will Pass Next Time

Firearms for sale at a gun show in Annapolis, Md., on April 14.
Andrew Harnik The Washington Times /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 8:09 am

Sen. Joe Manchin says he's going to reintroduce his bill that expands background checks for gun purchases to sales made at gun shows and online, and he predicts that the second time around, it will get enough votes to move out of the Senate.

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Latin America
3:56 am
Mon April 29, 2013

U.S.-Mexico Alliance Against Dug Cartels In Jeopardy

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 7:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Mexico is considering changes to its collaboration with the United States in the war on drugs. That was the news at the top of the story in the Washington Post. But for many of us, some information further down in the article was more revealing because the article detailed just how deep and broad the U.S.-Mexico collaboration is.

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Business
3:43 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 7:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with massive layoffs in Greece.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Greek lawmakers approved emergency plans to cut 15,000 government jobs by the end of next year. They have to do that in order to receive more European Union bailout funds.

The Greek parliament approved a measure in a vote on Sunday. Their new law will overturn what had been a constitutional guarantee for public sector workers to have a permanent position for life.

Business
3:43 am
Mon April 29, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 7:00 am

Attorneys, visitors, employees and inmates have been reviewing jails on the website Yelp. They offer opinions on everything from cleanliness to guard uniforms to abuse and corruption.

Around the Nation
3:43 am
Mon April 29, 2013

States Question What To Do With Surging Tax Revenue

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 12:07 pm

Across the country, state budgets are back in the black after years of belt-tightening and spending cuts. From California to Florida, in nearly every state, the economic recovery has produced a surge in tax revenue.

For governors and state legislators, that's produced a new question: how to spend the money.

The past three years have not been easy ones for elected officials. Nearly every state requires them to produce a balanced budget. And with declining revenue from sales, property and income taxes, that has meant big spending cuts.

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All Tech Considered
2:29 am
Mon April 29, 2013

After Sandy, Questions Linger Over Cellphone Reliability

Residents of the East Village in New York City look for cellphone reception Nov. 1 after Hurricane Sandy wiped out power and some cell towers.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 12:07 pm

Roughly one in four cellphone towers in the path of Hurricane Sandy went out of service. It was a frustrating and potentially dangerous experience for customers without a landline to fall back on. Now, local officials and communications experts are pushing providers to improve their performance during natural disasters.

Lori McCaskill lives in Brooklyn, and when Sandy hit last October, her Verizon cell service went out. She couldn't work. She couldn't check in with family and friends. Her sister was due to have a baby any day.

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Author Interviews
2:28 am
Mon April 29, 2013

A Grieving Brother Finds Solace In His Sister's 'Small Town'

Brother and sister Rod Dreher and Ruthie Leming grew up in a small town in rural Louisiana. Dreher left the tightknit community to pursue a journalism career but returned home after Leming died of lung cancer in 2010.
Courtesy Rod Dreher

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 11:21 am

When he was a teenager, journalist Rod Dreher couldn't wait to escape Louisiana. Now he has found his way home again in grief — after his sister's death from lung cancer. It was "in light" of that tragedy, Dreher says, that he discovered the value of community. It's the subject of his new book, The Little Way of Ruthie Leming: A Southern Girl, a Small Town, and the Secret of a Good Life.

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Shots - Health News
2:26 am
Mon April 29, 2013

How To Turn Down The Heat On Fiery Family Arguments

Parents can minimize the negative impact of their arguments on their children using a few simple techniques to calm down.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 9:54 am

All parents are bound to disagree, argue or even raise their voices with each other.

But psychologists say parents can minimize the negative impact of their arguments on their children. It's just a matter of using a few simple techniques to turn down the heat and repair the damage after it's over.

Psychologist Suzanne Phillips at Long Island University says one of the most important things for parents to remember when they're on the verge of a big argument is not to involve the child.

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Shots - Health News
2:26 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Shhh, The Kids Can Hear You Arguing (Even When They're Asleep)

Even during sleep, babies' brains continue to take in and process angry voices.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 7:17 pm

For years now, psychologists have been telling couples who yell at one another to stop for the sake of the kids. Such conflict in the home — even when no violence is involved — is associated with a host of negative behavioral and life outcomes for children.

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All Tech Considered
2:25 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Blazing The Trail For Female Programmers

Sarah Allen works with interns Lori Hsu (left) and Fito von Zastrow at the Blazing Cloud offices in San Francisco.
Ramin Rahimian for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 4:35 pm

This story is part of our series, The Changing Lives of Women.

Sarah Allen has been the only woman on a team of computer programmers a few times in the more than two decades she has worked in the field. Most notably, she led the team — as the lone female programmer — that created Flash video, the dominant technology for streaming video on the Web.

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Architecture
2:24 am
Mon April 29, 2013

How One Family Built America's Public Palaces

The elaborately tiled City Hall subway station in New York City — still extant but now closed to the public, alas — used the Guastavino touch to convince wary city dwellers to head underground for a train trip.
Michael Freeman National Buildling Museum

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 10:52 am

A Washington, D.C., museum wants you to spend some time looking up — to see soaring, vaulted tile ceilings built by a father-son team who left their mark on some of America's most important public spaces.

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U.S.
2:23 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Colorado's New Gun Laws Send Businesses Packing

Workers assemble 30-round capacity magazines at the Magpul Industries plant in Erie, Colo. The company, which employs 200 people, says it plans to move its entire operation out of the state.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 8:11 am

Colorado responded to the mass shootings in Aurora, Colo., and Newtown, Conn., by passing new gun control measures last month. That's not sitting well with several gun-related businesses in the Centennial State, where four companies have announced plans to relocate all or some of their operations.

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U.S.
4:18 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Teen Sexual Assault: Where Does The Conversation Start?

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 5:59 pm

The narrative has become all too familiar: accusations of sexual assault, followed by bullying of the victims on social media.

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The Two-Way
4:09 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Janos Starker, A Master Of The Cello, Dies At 88

Hungarian-born American cellist Janos Starker died Sunday at 88. Starker's career included more than 165 recordings, as well as decades of teaching.
Erich Auerbach Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 9:24 am

Cellist Janos Starker has died at 88, ending a life and career that saw him renowned for his skills as a soloist, his prodigious work with orchestras, and his commitment to teaching. Starker was born in Budapest in 1924; his path to becoming an international star included surviving life in a Nazi labor camp.

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Media
3:56 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Anti-Drug PSAs: Do They Work?

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 5:38 pm

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History
3:56 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

First He Invented The Phone. Then, Bell Left A Voice Message

Though the quality of the sound recordings is poor, we know what Alexander Graham Bell was saying because he left transcripts.
Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 3:28 pm

As the inventor of the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell is credited with bringing countless voices to our ears. And now, for the first time, here he is imploring us to hear his own voice:

The sound is scratchy. You have to strain to decipher it, but the words are clear. They're from Bell's lips, recorded in 1885 but unveiled just last week by the Smithsonian.

"It lets us know what the past was really like. It fills in a gap for people," says Shari Stout, collections manager at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

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Author Interviews
3:56 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Iran's Political Scene Is Sketchy For Cartoonists

"War" by Touka Neyestani: Neyestani received a degree in architecture from Tehran's Science and Industry University, and has been a cartoonist for more than 30 years.
International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 11:32 am

Iranian newspapers are rife with cartoons. They are a tradition, and play a big role voicing criticism of the country's authoritarian regime.

Increasingly, though, Iranian cartoonists have been imprisoned, received death threats, or gone into exile because of their work.

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