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Code Switch
9:18 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Breaking Golf's Color Barrier In Birmingham

Three men are denied access to a golf course in Columbus, Ohio, in January 1956. Blacks were regularly denied access to golf courses.
AP

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 5:07 pm

This week, All Things Considered host Audie Cornish traveled to Birmingham, Ala., to cover the 50th anniversary of the tumultuous civil rights protests that happened there. It's all part of NPR's series commemorating the monumental summer of 1963.

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Code Switch
8:27 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Jeah! We Mapped Out The 4 Basic Aspects Of Being A 'Bro'

Alyson Hurt NPR

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 7:45 pm

What up, bro? What's good, brah?

This is the chant of the bro, an equally parodied and celebrated genus of young men. (They've been designated "bros" mostly because, well, they say "bro" a whole lot.)

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The Two-Way
8:02 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Flooding Forces 100,000 From Their Homes In Calgary, Canada

Houses damaged along the edge of Cougar Creek in Canmore, Canada. Widespread flooding caused by torrential rains washed out bridges and roads prompting the evacuation of thousands on Thursday.
John Gibson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 9:55 am

Because of flooding that could prove historic, authorities in Calgary, Canada, have ordered 100,000 people in 22 communities across the city to evacuate their homes.

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The Two-Way
6:33 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Book News: Apple, DOJ Tussle As Ebook Price Fixing Trial Ends

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 9:32 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
6:16 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Navy Medic Gains Fame Saving Orphaned Baby Bunnies

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. When Navy medic Joshua Bisnar was deployed in Afghanistan he rescued some kittens and a baby frog. But when he saved four orphaned baby bunnies at Camp Pendleton in San Diego, he achieved Internet fame. He spotted the bunnies while raking a volleyball court, then fed them with an eyedropper. He shared the experience on Facebook and YouTube and it went viral. The warm and fuzzy comments include several marriage proposals. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:12 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Father And Son Celebrate Holes In One

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 6:13 am

Lonnie Whitener took his son golfing on Father's Day. The Houston Chronicle says they arrived at the sixth hole of a course in Richmond, Texas, and Whitener hit a hole in one. Zach, 13, teed off and also had a hole in one. The odds of that happening were about one in 17 million.

The Two-Way
6:08 am
Fri June 21, 2013

As Protests Grow, Brazilian President Calls Emergency Meeting

A demonstrator is shot by a rubber bullet as anti-riot police officers charge during a protest Thursday against corruption and price hikes in Rio de Janeiro.
Christophe Simon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 8:34 pm

By some estimates, about a million people marched in cities across Brazil on Thursday, airing a wide array of grievances. As O Globo frames it, it was a day marked by violent demonstrations, vandalism and intense clashes with military police.

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The Two-Way
5:41 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Lebron James Leads Heat To Back-To-Back NBA Titles

Dwyane Wade, left, and LeBron James celebrate after defeating the San Antonio Spurs 95-88 in Game Seven of the 2013 NBA Finals at AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami.
Kevin C. Cox Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 7:40 am

Lebron James, who evokes strong feelings on either side of the emotional spectrum, has led the Miami Heat to its second NBA title in a row.

After a heart-pounding, seven-game series that vacillated between teams, the Heat prevailed over the San Antonio Spurs 95-88 on Thursday. The Miami Herald explains:

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Space
5:11 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Miami Wins Back-To-Back NBA Championships, James MVP

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

By now, you might have heard, for the second straight year the Miami Heat are NBA champions.

INSKEEP: They defeated the San Antonio Spurs 95-to-88 in Game 7 in Miami. The Heat's LeBron James scored 37 points on his way to a second consecutive MVP award.

MONTAGNE: NPR's Mike Pesca was at the game and he has this report.

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Politics
5:03 am
Fri June 21, 2013

The Death Penalty's Slow But Seemingly Sure Decline

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn speaks with reporters at the Capitol in 2011 after signing legislation abolishing the death penalty in the state.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 12:00 pm

The death penalty has become a bit like the Cheshire cat in Alice in Wonderland. It may never fade away entirely, but capital punishment is certainly less visible or actively pursued than it used to be.

In May, Maryland became the sixth state in as many years to abolish the death penalty. Across the nation as a whole, fewer criminals are being put to death. Last year, 43 were executed, down significantly from the peak of 98 back in 1999.

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Planet Money
4:19 am
Fri June 21, 2013

How Brush Factories Survive In America

Fourth-generation owner of Braun Brush, Lance Cheney, stands next to a special-order brush his company made for the artist Richard Artschwager.
Marianne McCune NPR

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 2:46 pm

Brushes are pretty simple: a bunch of flexible fibers sticking out of something stiff. Not surprisingly, Chinese manufacturers have grabbed a big share of the U.S. brush market. But several hundred small U.S. brush factories are still hanging on. Here are three strategies they're using to survive.

1. Compete On Quality

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Middle East
3:45 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Can Iran's New President Resolve Nuclear Program Dispute?

Many are wondering whether Iran's newly elected president Hassan Rowhani will be able to change his nation's posture on nuclear enrichment and convince the West to end crippling economic sanctions. To find out, Steve Inskeep talks to Gary Samore, a former White House coordinator for arms control and weapons of mass destruction.

Business
3:34 am
Fri June 21, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 7:46 am

Gandolfini, who died this week while vacationing in Italy, became famous for his role in The Sopranos. Tony Soprano, the mob boss, described his job as "waste management consultant." Call it what you want, but on the job, Tony Soprano had plenty of business insights.

NPR Story
3:26 am
Fri June 21, 2013

2 Syrian Rebels Share Their Stories

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 5:53 am

U.S. and European officials meet on Saturday to decide how to increase their aid to the rebels in Syria. The U.S. is deepening its involvement in Syria's Civil War. Steve Inskeep, who recently was in Syria reporting for Morning Edition, has the story of two rebels.

NPR Story
3:26 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Suspense Builds For Verdicts On Most-Watched High Court Cases

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 5:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's now delve into the mysteries of the highest court in the land. The Supreme Court handed down a handful of important decisions yesterday but left the nation in suspense over the most watched cases of the year: affirmative action, gay marriage and the Voting Rights Act. There's a week left in the high court's term and we wanted to know why the justices always seem to leave the biggest decisions until the very last minute. So we called in NPR's legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. Good morning, Nina.

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NPR Story
3:26 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 6:01 am

Libor is the London interbank offered rate. It's important because it establishes the rate that banks pay to borrow from one another.

Shots - Health News
2:04 am
Fri June 21, 2013

With Health Exchanges Poised To Open, PR Push Draws Scrutiny

In San Jose, Calif., on June 6, President Obama encouraged people to sign up for insurance in the nation's largest health insurance market.
Stephen Lam Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 8:07 pm

This weekend marks 100 days until people can begin signing up for new health insurance coverage under the federal health care law. It also marks another milestone: the launch of an enormous public relations effort to find people eligible for new coverage and urge them to sign up when the time comes.

But like everything else about the health law, even this seemingly innocuous effort has been touched by controversy.

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National Security
2:03 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Obama's Pick To Lead FBI Adds New Layer To Privacy Debate

Jim Comey, then deputy attorney general, testifies during a House Judiciary Committee hearing in 2005.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 3:34 am

President Obama will formally nominate Jim Comey to be the country's next FBI director on Friday.

Comey, a registered Republican and longtime federal prosecutor, is best-known for raising alarms inside the Bush White House about a secret electronic surveillance program. That issue has taken on new resonance after disclosures about the Obama administration's dragnet collection of American phone records.

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StoryCorps
2:02 am
Fri June 21, 2013

For A Boy With Little, Learning To Love A Castoff Trombone

On a visit to StoryCorps in Phoenix, Gilbert Zermeno told his wife, Pat Powers-Zermeno, about what it was like to grow up poor while yearning to join the school band.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 9:57 am

Gilbert Zermeno came from a big family who didn't have much. They lived on the plains of West Texas and got by on the $100 a week that Gilbert's father made working the cotton fields.

So when Gilbert wanted to join the school band in sixth grade, his parents had to get creative, as he explained to his wife, Pat Powers-Zermeno, during a recent visit to StoryCorps in Phoenix.

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The Salt
6:04 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

How Circadian Rhythms Give Vegetables A Healthy Boost

Researchers at Rice University conducted lab studies using light-dark cycles to try to coax more beneficial compounds out of fruits and vegetables.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 3:56 pm

Just as we have internal clocks that help regulate the systems in our bodies, fruit and vegetable plants have circadian rhythms, too.

And a new study published in Current Biology finds there may be a way to boost some of the beneficial compounds in plants by simulating the light-dark cycle after crops are harvested.

So, how does it work?

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History
5:42 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

The Desegregation Of Birmingham's Golf Courses

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 5:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. All this week, I'm in Birmingham, Alabama, where the city is in the midst of commemorating the 50th anniversary of the tumultuous and influential civil rights protests that occurred here. One place that might not come to mind when you think about this period is the golf course.

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Book Reviews
4:39 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

'Crazy Rich Asians': Lives Of The .0001 Percent

The Venetian Macao, the world's biggest casino by gaming tables, opened to the public in 2007.
Mike Clarke AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 5:42 pm

It's impossible to open the newspaper or turn on the TV these days without seeing some outrageous example of new Asian money. From a castle modeled on Versailles in Changsha to billion-dollar penthouses in Bombay to the Marina Bay Sands casino in Singapore, with its seven celebrity-chef restaurants, the inescapable truth looms before us: We Asians are not just rich but also, frankly, somewhat crazy.

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Television
4:31 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

'Dome' Luck: On CBS, A Drama About Getting Stuck With Each Other

In the wake of the dome's mysterious appearance, the townspeople are cut off from access to TV, phones and the Internet, and must make do with the people and objects they have at their disposal.
CBS

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 3:55 pm

One of the most anticipated shows of the summer, Under the Dome, starts Monday on CBS. It's about a tiny New England town that's suddenly and mysteriously sealed off by an impenetrable dome.

The series is the first on-screen collaboration between two of the biggest Steves in popular culture — Steven Spielberg and Stephen King.

"The Steven Squared, we call it," cracks Neal Baer, an executive producer of the show.

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The Two-Way
4:25 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Dow Loses 350 Points After Fed Hints It Will Stop Buying Bonds

Traders work the floor of the New York Stock Exchange after the opening bell on Thursday.
John Moore Getty Images

The Dow Jones industrial average closed down more than 353 points on Thursday in a selloff sparked by uncertainty about the end of a government monetary stimulus program and a credit crunch in China.

Wall Street followed a downturn in global markets. The Standard & Poor's 500-stock index lost 2.5 percent, while the Dow and Nasdaq composite indexes both lost 2.3 percent.

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The Two-Way
4:25 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Gay-Therapy Ministry Shuts Down, Says 'We've Hurt People'

Alan Chambers, president of Exodus International, with his wife, Leslie, in a May 2006 photo.
Phelan M. Ebenhack AP

Gay-rights activists have welcomed a decision by a Christian ministry dedicated to "curing" homosexuals to shut its doors, praising the organization's president for his "integrity and authenticity" in offering an apology for the group's actions.

The Orlando, Fla., based Exodus International, which calls itself the oldest and largest Christian ministry dealing with faith and homosexuality, announced Thursday that it would cease its operations.

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The Two-Way
4:04 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

NSA Reportedly Allowed To Keep Some Domestic Communications

Attorney General Eric Holder reportedly signed off on the FISA court rulings that allowed the NSA to retain domestic communications under some circumstances.
Handout Getty Images

Special U.S. courts charged with authorizing electronic surveillance of suspected foreign terrorists gave permission to the NSA to retain in certain cases "inadvertently acquired" domestic communications, The Guardian reports.

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Around the Nation
3:49 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Rogue Jumpers Parachute From Top Of Chicago's Trump Tower

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 10:19 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Finally, a big jump and a mystery in Chicago. Police are searching for three men who jumped off the top of the 92-story Trump Tower late last night with parachutes. They managed to land and escape before police arrived.

NPR's David Schaper has been gathering reaction in Chicago.

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The Two-Way
2:37 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Six-Woman Jury Selected For Trial Of George Zimmerman

Six women have been selected for the trial of George Zimmerman, right, on second-degree murder charges in the death of Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman was in court Thursday with his defense attorney, Mark O'Mara.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 6:02 pm

A jury has been settled upon in the trial of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin. The six-member panel is made up entirely of female jurors; five of them are white women, according to reports.

Attorneys in the trial finished questioning potential jurors around mid-day Thursday; they are also selecting four alternate jurors for the trial.

Update at 7 p.m. ET: Jury Sworn In:

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Parallels
2:35 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

What's In A Name? A Lot If You're A Country

Afghan President Hamid Karzai reportedly pulled his representatives out of planned peace talks because of the flag and the nameplate at the Taliban office in Doha, Qatar. Both were legacies of the time the Taliban ruled the country and illustrated how sensitive such symbols can be.
EPA/Landov

A flag and a nameplate: Those seemingly innocuous items were apparently the reason that Afghan President Hamid Karzai abruptly refused to participate in peace talks also involving the Taliban and the U.S.

The flag was the same white flag the Taliban used when they ruled Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001. The nameplate bore the words "Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan," the name used by the old Taliban government.

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Author Interviews
1:50 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

'The Center Holds' Sees Victory For Moderates In Obama's Win

In his new book, The Center Holds, Jonathan Alter looks at President Obama's re-election campaign.
Simon & Schuster

Journalist Jonathan Alter sees the 2012 presidential contest as the most consequential election of recent times. In his new book, The Center Holds, Alter argues that President Obama's re-election prevented the country from veering sharply to the right.

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