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Author Interviews
12:25 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Oliver Sacks, Exploring How Hallucinations Happen

Knopf

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 1:28 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Nov. 6, 2012.

In Oliver Sacks' book The Mind's Eye, the neurologist included an interesting footnote in a chapter about losing vision in one eye because of cancer that said: "In the '60s, during a period of experimenting with large doses of amphetamines, I experienced a different sort of vivid mental imagery."

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Shots - Health News
12:09 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

FDA OKs Prescription-Free Plan B For All Ages, Ending Battle

Protesters picket in front of the Jacob K. Javits Federal Building in New York City in 2006 for the removal of an age limit on the morning-after pill.
Bloomberg Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 3:23 pm

The Food and Drug Administration Thursday evening approved over-the-counter sale, with no age restrictions, of Plan B One-Step. That's the morning-after pill whose status has been the subject of a dozen years of political wrangling and legal dispute.

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The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Online Sales Cost Cities And Counties Billions In Taxes, Mayors Say

A chart shows estimated tax revenue losses due to online sales in 11 U.S. cities. Figures for 2013 are projections.
IHS Global Insight

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 4:53 pm

Online retail sales are cutting into tax revenue in counties and cities, according to a report issued by the U.S. Conference of Mayors on Friday. They estimate the lost revenue for America's largest cities and counties came to about $2.8 billion for 2011 and 2012, combined.

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The Two-Way
11:59 am
Fri June 21, 2013

With Flurry Of Goals Against S. Korea, Abby Wambach Makes History

Abby Wambach of the United States reacts during her match against South Korea Thursday at Red Bull Stadium in Harrison, N.J.
Don Emmert AFP/Getty Images

Last night, history was made on the pitch in Harrison, N.J.: Abby Wambach scored four goals against South Korea and became the all-time top female scorer in the world.

That third one — scored about 30 minutes into the first half — was her 159th, and it means that Wambach has overtaken Mia Hamm, another legendary American player.

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The Salt
11:32 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Farm Free Or Die! Maine Towns Rebel Against Food Rules

Dan Brown pets "Sprocket," his family's 4-year-old, sole milking cow, before hosing her down at his farm in Blue Hill, Maine. Brown has become the poster child for Maine's food sovereignty movement.
John Clarke Russ Bangor Daily News

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 4:18 pm

New Englanders have never been shy about revolting against what they see as unfair food regulations. Remember that whole Boston Tea Party thing?

So perhaps it's not so surprising that in Maine, towns have been staging another revolution: They've declared independence from state and federal regulations on locally produced foods.

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Health
10:46 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Obesity Is A 'Disease.' Now What?

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, you've heard about gay marriage and affirmative reaction cases before the Supreme Court, but we'll talk about another important case that isn't getting a lot of attention in just a few minutes. But first, over the past few decades, obesity has become a serious health care issue in the United States. The obesity rate was 13 percent in 1962, it now stands at 34 percent of adults and 17 percent of children.

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Law
10:46 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Who Will Care For 'Baby Veronica?'

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we turn to the Supreme Court. The country is waiting on several rulings, important cases dealing with affirmative action, voting rights, and same-sex marriage. But there are other pending cases with lower profiles that still carry really profound implications for the country.

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Barbershop
10:46 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Humble Pie And Doughnut Burgers In The Barbershop

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michelle Martin is away today. And it's time, yet again, for our weekly visit to the barbershop. The guys are going to talk about what's in the news, what's on their minds.

Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week - writer and culture critic Jimi Izrael, contributing editor for The Root, Corey Dade. Arsalan Iftikhar - he's senior editor of the Islamic Monthly and founder of TheMuslimGuy.com. They're all here in D.C. with me. How're you guys doing?

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NPR Story
10:17 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Vegetables Respond to a Daily Clock, Even After Harvest

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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NPR Story
10:17 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Coffee's Natural Creamer

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Flora Lichtman is here with our Video Pick of the Week. And it is more coffee.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Our fabulous coffee series by the great Jenny Woodward continues on SCIENCE FRIDAY. Drink up, everybody. This week we're diving into a tiny glass of espresso.

FLATOW: Ooh. Ooh. So small dive.

LICHTMAN: You need to be very careful. Keep your limbs in.

FLATOW: And why - what's so fascinating about espresso?

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NPR Story
10:17 am
Fri June 21, 2013

E.O. Wilson's Advice for Future Scientists

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. In his long career studying ants, nature and ecology, E.O. Wilson has been no stranger to controversy. In the 1970s he was doused with water at a science meeting for presenting his theory on sociobiology. Another new evolutionary theory he introduced a few years ago on kin selection continues to be hotly debated.

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Digital Life
10:17 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Beaming Internet to the Boondocks, Via Balloon

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. If you have a smartphone, you might take the Internet for granted, right? It's always there. But around the world, some four and a half billion people still are not connected. Google, being in the Internet business, has a plan to expand its reach, bring Internet to all these people, but it's not by spooling out fiber-optic cable or building cell towers. It's using a technology that, well, sort of sounds like it belongs in another century: free-floating balloons. They call it Project Loon.

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Technology
10:17 am
Fri June 21, 2013

A Calculating Win for China's New Supercomputer

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Every six months, one of my next guests ranks the 500 fastest computers in the world, the supercomputers, and back in November 2010, China took number one for the first time with a supercomputer called Milky Way 1. President Obama acknowledged China's feat in his State of the Union address a few months later and said we were facing a Sputnik moment.

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Education
10:17 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Goodnight Moon, Goodnight Math

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

OK. Maybe E. O. Wilson's comments in his new book, "Letters to a Young Scientist", essentially says you don't want to have to be great at math to have a career in science, but it can't hurt, right? And to be great at math, it pays to start young, and my next guest is a - has a plan for you. Laura Overdeck is the founder of Bedtime Math. Her mission: to make math friendlier in a way by introducing kids to math problems at an early age.

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Science
10:17 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Physicists Find New Particle, Look for Answers

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 9:42 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. This week, researchers reported that they think they've spotted the tell-tale signs of a previously undiscovered, subatomic particle. This one was unusual because it appeared to be made of four quarks bound together, an arrangement they have never seen before. And they're not sure exactly how that arrangement might work.

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The Two-Way
10:09 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Welcome, Summer! Revelers Celebrate The Solstice

In Macedonia, people look at the horizon from a rocky crest filled with astronomical markers at the megalithic observatory Kokino, which NASA ranks as the fourth oldest observatory in the world.
Robert Atanasovki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 11:42 am

Whether you like it or not, the day will be bright. For those of us in the northern hemisphere, today is the summer solstice, which marks the longest daylight period of the year and the official start of summer.

As The Weather Channel explains, it's also a little more special this year, because the solstice occurred on different days for different time zones.

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Code Switch
9:18 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Breaking Golf's Color Barrier In Birmingham

Three men are denied access to a golf course in Columbus, Ohio, in January 1956. Blacks were regularly denied access to golf courses.
AP

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 5:07 pm

This week, All Things Considered host Audie Cornish traveled to Birmingham, Ala., to cover the 50th anniversary of the tumultuous civil rights protests that happened there. It's all part of NPR's series commemorating the monumental summer of 1963.

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Code Switch
8:27 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Jeah! We Mapped Out The 4 Basic Aspects Of Being A 'Bro'

Alyson Hurt NPR

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 7:45 pm

What up, bro? What's good, brah?

This is the chant of the bro, an equally parodied and celebrated genus of young men. (They've been designated "bros" mostly because, well, they say "bro" a whole lot.)

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The Two-Way
8:02 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Flooding Forces 100,000 From Their Homes In Calgary, Canada

Houses damaged along the edge of Cougar Creek in Canmore, Canada. Widespread flooding caused by torrential rains washed out bridges and roads prompting the evacuation of thousands on Thursday.
John Gibson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 9:55 am

Because of flooding that could prove historic, authorities in Calgary, Canada, have ordered 100,000 people in 22 communities across the city to evacuate their homes.

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The Two-Way
6:33 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Book News: Apple, DOJ Tussle As Ebook Price Fixing Trial Ends

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 9:32 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
6:16 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Navy Medic Gains Fame Saving Orphaned Baby Bunnies

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. When Navy medic Joshua Bisnar was deployed in Afghanistan he rescued some kittens and a baby frog. But when he saved four orphaned baby bunnies at Camp Pendleton in San Diego, he achieved Internet fame. He spotted the bunnies while raking a volleyball court, then fed them with an eyedropper. He shared the experience on Facebook and YouTube and it went viral. The warm and fuzzy comments include several marriage proposals. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:12 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Father And Son Celebrate Holes In One

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 6:13 am

Lonnie Whitener took his son golfing on Father's Day. The Houston Chronicle says they arrived at the sixth hole of a course in Richmond, Texas, and Whitener hit a hole in one. Zach, 13, teed off and also had a hole in one. The odds of that happening were about one in 17 million.

The Two-Way
6:08 am
Fri June 21, 2013

As Protests Grow, Brazilian President Calls Emergency Meeting

A demonstrator is shot by a rubber bullet as anti-riot police officers charge during a protest Thursday against corruption and price hikes in Rio de Janeiro.
Christophe Simon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 8:34 pm

By some estimates, about a million people marched in cities across Brazil on Thursday, airing a wide array of grievances. As O Globo frames it, it was a day marked by violent demonstrations, vandalism and intense clashes with military police.

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The Two-Way
5:41 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Lebron James Leads Heat To Back-To-Back NBA Titles

Dwyane Wade, left, and LeBron James celebrate after defeating the San Antonio Spurs 95-88 in Game Seven of the 2013 NBA Finals at AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami.
Kevin C. Cox Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 7:40 am

Lebron James, who evokes strong feelings on either side of the emotional spectrum, has led the Miami Heat to its second NBA title in a row.

After a heart-pounding, seven-game series that vacillated between teams, the Heat prevailed over the San Antonio Spurs 95-88 on Thursday. The Miami Herald explains:

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Space
5:11 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Miami Wins Back-To-Back NBA Championships, James MVP

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

By now, you might have heard, for the second straight year the Miami Heat are NBA champions.

INSKEEP: They defeated the San Antonio Spurs 95-to-88 in Game 7 in Miami. The Heat's LeBron James scored 37 points on his way to a second consecutive MVP award.

MONTAGNE: NPR's Mike Pesca was at the game and he has this report.

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Politics
5:03 am
Fri June 21, 2013

The Death Penalty's Slow But Seemingly Sure Decline

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn speaks with reporters at the Capitol in 2011 after signing legislation abolishing the death penalty in the state.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 12:00 pm

The death penalty has become a bit like the Cheshire cat in Alice in Wonderland. It may never fade away entirely, but capital punishment is certainly less visible or actively pursued than it used to be.

In May, Maryland became the sixth state in as many years to abolish the death penalty. Across the nation as a whole, fewer criminals are being put to death. Last year, 43 were executed, down significantly from the peak of 98 back in 1999.

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Planet Money
4:19 am
Fri June 21, 2013

How Brush Factories Survive In America

Fourth-generation owner of Braun Brush, Lance Cheney, stands next to a special-order brush his company made for the artist Richard Artschwager.
Marianne McCune NPR

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 2:46 pm

Brushes are pretty simple: a bunch of flexible fibers sticking out of something stiff. Not surprisingly, Chinese manufacturers have grabbed a big share of the U.S. brush market. But several hundred small U.S. brush factories are still hanging on. Here are three strategies they're using to survive.

1. Compete On Quality

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Middle East
3:45 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Can Iran's New President Resolve Nuclear Program Dispute?

Many are wondering whether Iran's newly elected president Hassan Rowhani will be able to change his nation's posture on nuclear enrichment and convince the West to end crippling economic sanctions. To find out, Steve Inskeep talks to Gary Samore, a former White House coordinator for arms control and weapons of mass destruction.

Business
3:34 am
Fri June 21, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 7:46 am

Gandolfini, who died this week while vacationing in Italy, became famous for his role in The Sopranos. Tony Soprano, the mob boss, described his job as "waste management consultant." Call it what you want, but on the job, Tony Soprano had plenty of business insights.

NPR Story
3:26 am
Fri June 21, 2013

2 Syrian Rebels Share Their Stories

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 5:53 am

U.S. and European officials meet on Saturday to decide how to increase their aid to the rebels in Syria. The U.S. is deepening its involvement in Syria's Civil War. Steve Inskeep, who recently was in Syria reporting for Morning Edition, has the story of two rebels.

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