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2:42 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Finding Simple Tests For Brain Disorders Turns Out To Be Complex

Anne Jones, 62, and Robin Jones, 73, at their home in Menlo Park, Calif. He took a test that revealed proteins typical of Alzheimer's disease.
Ramin Rahimian for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:17 pm

If you're having chest pain, your doctor can test you for a heart attack. If you're having hip pain, your doctor could test for osteoarthritis.

But what if you're depressed? Or anxious? Currently there are no physical tests for most disorders that affect the mind. Lab tests like these could transform the field of mental illness. So far efforts to come up with biomarkers for common mental health disorders have proved largely fruitless.

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Parallels
2:41 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Call Centers Call On Multilingual Portuguese

New employees train for call center work at Teleperformance Portugal, an outsourcing company in Lisbon. The outsourcing industry is adding thousands of jobs while other Portuguese industries shed them.
Jose Faria Courtesy of Teleperformance Portugal

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:04 pm

Filipa Neves speaks five languages but still couldn't find steady work in her native Portugal. So she was about to move to Angola, a former Portuguese colony in Africa, where the economy is booming.

But she sent off one last resumé — to a call center. It was sort of a last resort. She'd heard the stereotype.

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Author Interviews
5:31 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

How 'Dancing In The Street' Became A Protest Anthem

In November 1964, Betty Kelly, Martha Reeves and Rosalind Ashford (aka Martha Reeves and the Vandellas) were at the top of the charts with their hit "Dancing in the Street."
AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

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The Two-Way
4:36 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

For Pilots, Most Landings Are 'Routine' Procedure

This aerial photo shows the wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport on Saturday.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

Two Chinese teenagers were killed and dozens of other passengers were injured when an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777's tail snapped off and the plane struck the ground just short of the runway on Saturday. Dramatic landings like this are ones commercial pilots hope to never encounter as they guide the hundreds of planes safely to the ground each day.

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Around the Nation
3:58 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

New Handicapped Sign Rolls Into New York City

In the beginning of their project, Sara Hendren and Brian Glenney stuck their new design over existing handicapped signs around Boston.
Darcy Hildreth

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

The handicapped sign is getting a new look — at least in New York City.

The initial design, created in 1968, depicted a person with no head in a wheelchair. The sign has changed since then — the figure eventually got a head — and now it's trying something new.

Sara Hendren, a Harvard graduate design student, is co-creator of a guerrilla street art project that replaces the old sign with something more active.

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Theater
3:58 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Broadway's 'First Date': A Greek Chorus Of Emotional Baggage

Krysta Rodriguez played Ana Vargas in the recently canceled backstage-on-Broadway TV series Smash, and Zachary Levi earned a fervent following in the title role of NBC's Chuck. Both performers have backgrounds in the theater, and they'll be together on Broadway this summer in the premiere of the musical comedy First Date.
Matthew Murphy

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

Many fans of the TV show Chuck fell in love with the nerd-turned-unwitting spy at the heart of the show, but most probably didn't know that he could sing.

Zachary Levi is now rehearsing for his first role on Broadway — a new musical comedy called First Date — which also features Krysta Rodriguez, the star of another NBC program, Smash.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Russian Lawmaker: Venezuela May Be Last Chance For Snowden

A prominent member of Russia's parliament is adding to pressure on former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden to leave Russia.

AS NPR's Corey Flintoff reports, Alexei Pushkov, the head of the foreign affairs committee in Russia's parliament, said on Twitter that Venezuela is waiting for an answer from Snowden, adding that this might be the 30-year-old computer analyst's last chance to receive asylum.

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Britain Deports Radical Cleric To Jordan

Muslim Cleric Abu Qatada arrives home after being released from prison in London on Nov. 13, 2012.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Britain has deported a radical Muslim cleric top his homeland, Jordan, where he appeared in court Sunday and was formally charged with terrorism-related offenses.

Abu Qatada was first arrested in Britain in 2001 over alleged terrorist links. He was rearrested in 2005.

The 53-year-old cleric was held at a prison in southeast London, and was taken from there to the airport at midnight Sunday. The BBC reports that he was accompanied on the flight by "six people from Jordan, comprising three security officials, a psychologist, a medical examiner and his Jordanian lawyer."

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Mob Brutally Kills Soccer Referee After Player Is Stabbed And Killed In Brazil

Brazilian police have made an arrest in a grisly incident during a soccer match, in which a referee's leveling of a red card penalty set off a clash with a player that resulted in the player's death and ended with the official being brutally killed.

The killings occurred during an amateur game last Sunday, June 30, in Maranhão, a state in Brazil's northeast that is west of Recife.

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The Two-Way
11:52 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Murray Beats Djokovic To Win Men's Title At Wimbledon

Andy Murray broke Britain's more than seven-decade men's title drought Sunday, beating top seed Novak Djokovic in straight sets.
Anja Niedringhaus AP

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 12:17 pm

Andy Murray broke Britain's more than seven decade men's title drought at Wimbledon on Sunday, beating top seed Novak Djokovic in straight sets.

Murray won 6-4, 7-5, 6-4 in a hard-fought 3-hour, 9-minute match, which the Associated Press noted, was "filled with long, punishing rallies and a final game that may have felt like another 77 years, with Murray squandering three match points before finally putting it away after four deuces."

Here's more from the AP:

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The Two-Way
10:37 am
Sun July 7, 2013

BBC, Radio Announcer Apologize To Wimbledon Champ Bartoli

France's Marion Bartoli celebrates her Wimbledon women's singles championship. The BBC has apologized to Bartoli for remarks an announcer made about her appearance.
Dominic Lipinski PA Photos/Landov

The BBC and one of its radio tennis commentators are apologizing to Marion Bartoli, after announcer John Inverdale's remarks about the 2013 Wimbledon champion's appearance angered many listeners.

Bartoli, 28, reached a milestone in her life Saturday, by winning the women's singles final at Wimbledon. And that's the perspective she kept after learning of Inverdale's unflattering remarks, in which he suggested that her father might have told Bartoli that she needed to work hard to overcome the fact that she was "never going to be a looker."

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The Two-Way
10:28 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Quebec Town Still Ablaze After Runaway Train Explosion

Firefighters douse flames after a freight train loaded with oil derailed in Lac-Megantic in Canada's Quebec province on Saturday.
Francois Laplante-Delagrave AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 7:25 am

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Strange News
10:19 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Random Acts Of Tipping

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
10:19 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Stevens Leaves Butler To Coach Boston Celtics

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Sad times in Indianapolis. Brad Stevens, the famous coach of the Butler Bulldogs men's college basketball team announced this past week that he is leaving to coach the NBA's Boston Celtics.

And that means a new, big-league salary for Stevens. He is reportedly stepping into a six-year, $22 million contract.

Here to do the due diligence on that deal is NPR's Mike Pesca. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: How are you doing? Got my green eyeshades on.

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The Two-Way
9:46 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Asiana Flight Tried To Abort Landing Seconds Before Crash

The wreckage of Asiana Flight 214, a Boeing 777 airliner, is seen after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport Saturday. The crash-landing killed two teenage Chinese girls, the airline says.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:39 pm

Update at 5:54 p.m.

Asiana Airlines Flight 214 tried to abort its landing and come in for another try just 1 1/2 seconds before it crashed Saturday at San Francisco airport, killing two people and injuring dozens of others.

That was the information gleaned from the jetliner's cockpit voice recorder, the head of the National Transportation Safety Board said at a Sunday news conference. NTSB chief Deborah Hersman also said about seven seconds prior to impact, there was a call to increase speed.

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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Rivals Rally In Cairo As Egypt Uncertainty Continues

State media and other sources had confirmed Saturday that Mohamed ElBaradei, the former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, would be Egypt's interim prime minister. Later in the day, the president's spokesperson walked it back.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:27 pm

(This story was last updated at 4:16 p.m. ET)

Egyptians remain deeply divided about which direction their country should go as supporters and opponents of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi are turning out Sunday to voice their opinions in separate rallies.

NPR's Greg Dixon filed this story for our Newscast Unit:

"Hundreds of thousands of opponents of deposed President Morsi have come here, Tahrir Square, in the center of Cairo to show their support for the toppling of his government.

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Middle East
6:03 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Sexual Assaults Reportedly Rampant During Egypt Protests

The bridge leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo was quiet Saturday morning, but activists say more than 100 women were sexually assaulted during protests there last week.
Hiro Komae AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:31 pm

From afar, Tahrir Square appears almost festive as protesters chant against the Islamist president who was overthrown by the Egyptian military last week. But inside the crushing crowds, the scene can be a lot more sinister.

In a video posted by the Muslim Brotherhood, an unidentified woman cries out as men attack her. The group, from which former President Mohammed Morsi hails, claims the attack occurred in Tahrir Square in late June.

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NPR Story
5:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Britain Appears Ready to Approve New IVF Procedure

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Britain is the country where the first test tube baby was born. Now, the United Kingdom is considering another groundbreaking - and controversial - fertility procedure. The British government appears ready to legalize a process in which a baby is conceived with the genetic material from three people. The science goes like this. Inside every mother's egg cells are all of her genes. All her DNA is packed inside the nucleus. And when she has a child, her DNA gets passed down.

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NPR Story
5:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Ireland May Allow Limited Abortions

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Politicians in the Catholic Republic of Ireland have overwhelmingly voted to introduce abortion in cases where the woman's life is in danger or she is at risk of suicide. John Waters, columnist for the Irish Times, speaks with Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin about this sensitive issue.

NPR Story
5:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Defense's Turn In Zimmerman Trial

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

It has been an emotional week inside the courtroom in Sanford, Florida, where George Zimmerman stands trial for the murder of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. The mothers of both Zimmerman and Martin took the stand, each claiming that it was her son acting in self-defense during the nighttime standoff in the Sanford neighborhood, in the winter of last year. The prosecution rested its case on Friday. Tomorrow, the defense continues presenting witnesses.

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NPR Story
5:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Who Is Putting Tiny Doors On Storefronts In Ann Arbor

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Over the last several years, residents in Ann Arbor, Michigan have noticed a magical phenomenon around town: a series of very tiny doors have appeared around the streets. Sounded like a mystery worth looking into, so we have reached out to Jonathan Wright. He runs a website called Urban Fairies Operations and he knows a lot about this mysterious phenomenon. Thanks so much for joining us, Mr. Wright.

JONATHAN WRIGHT: Thank you, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, when did these tiny little doors start to appear?

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NPR Story
5:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

At The Trial Of Whitey Bulger

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Crash At San Francisco Airport Kills Two

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Syrian Opposition Elects New Leader

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to stay in the Middle East, turning out attention now to Syria, where the main opposition coalition has a new leader. During meetings in Istanbul, opposition leaders elected Ahmad al-Jarba, who has close ties to Saudi Arabia. The change comes as civilians in Syria's central city of Homs are facing a fierce government assault. NPR's Peter Kenyon has more.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: After another two-day Syrian Coalition meeting had spilled over into a third day with more to come, spokesman Khaled Saleh had some news.

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NPR Story
5:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Will Egypt's Fragile Democracy Stick?

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Sunday Conversation
5:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Even Married, They Can't Be Together Legally

Courtesy of Caly Muniz Castro

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:40 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

As immigration legislation moves through Congress, there are still major obstacles to any kind of compromise. It's a tense waiting game for those in the country illegally — even for those who supposedly have a leg up in the process because they have married a U.S. citizen.

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U.S.
1:53 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Despite Hefty Payouts, Fire Insurance Costs Hold Steady

Firefighter Brandie Smith walks by the remains of a structure destroyed in the Black Forest wildfire north of Colorado Springs last month. More than 500 homes have been lost to wildfire in the state this year.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:46 pm

Wildfires have already destroyed hundreds of homes in the American West this year. The insurance industry is once again poised to pay out hundreds of millions of dollars to cover those losses, as it already has for homeowners who lost their houses during last year's fire season.

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The Two-Way
1:50 am
Sun July 7, 2013

The New World Of Firefighting: Politics, Climate And Humans

An aerial tanker drops fire retardant on a wildfire threatening homes near Yarnell, Ariz., on July 1. An elite crew of firefighters was overtaken by the out-of-control blaze on June 30, killing 19 members as they tried to protect themselves from the flames under fire-resistant shields.
Chris Carlson AP

Writer and photojournalist Michael Kodas has been documenting firefighting and firefighters for more than a decade. His current book project, Megafire, an examination of the new world faced by firefighters, will be released in 2014. Kodas, also the author of High Crimes: The Fate of Everest in an Age of Greed, lives in Boulder, Colo.

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U.S.
7:40 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Officials Confirm Fatalities In San Francisco Plane Accident

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

Transcript

REBECCA SHEIR, HOST:

It's Weekends on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Rebecca Sheir. We go to the latest now out of San Francisco. An Asiana Airlines flight from Seoul, South Korea crashed there earlier today. Two people are confirmed dead, several are injured. NPR's Richard Gonzales joins us now from San Francisco with the latest. Now, Richard, let's start with casualties. What do we know at this point?

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U.S.
6:35 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

San Francisco General Takes In Patients From Plane Crash

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

Transcript

REBECCA SHEIR, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News, I'm Rebecca Sheir. More now on the breaking news out of San Francisco. That's where an Asiana Airlines flight from Seoul, South Korea, crashed earlier today.

Reporter Molly Samuel is with our member station KQED, and she joins us from the San Francisco General Hospital. And I understand there was just a press conference there. So, Molly, what do we know now?

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