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Remembrances
3:54 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

From Stadiums To Shelters: Remembering Pritzker Winner Frei Otto

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 9:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
3:54 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Targeting Unions: Right-To-Work Movement Bolstered By Wisconsin

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker became a Republican political star by taking on his state's public employee unions. This week he signed a bill that would weaken private-sector unions.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 9:40 pm

This week, Wisconsin became the nation's 25th right-to-work state. It passed a law saying workers cannot be forced to join labor unions, or pay union dues, to keep a job.

There's a concerted effort in many states to pass laws that would weaken the power of labor unions. But unions and their allies are also fighting back in many places.

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The Two-Way
2:56 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Why The GOP Iran Letter Is Spurring Debate Over An 18th Century Law

Its doubtful that Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton (right) will face legal consequences for the letter he wrote to Iran. The Logan Act hasn't been used to prosecute anyone since it was passed more than 200 years ago.
Lauren Victoria Burke AP

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 6:31 pm

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET.

It may have been politically rude, but was the open letter 47 Republican senators sent to Iran this week illegal?

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Why A Strong Dollar Sent Markets Plummeting

(401(K) 2012/Flickr)

U.S. stock indexes opened a little higher Wednesday, after taking a tumble the day before. The Dow and S & P 500 both fell by close to 2 percent. The moves come as the U.S. dollar continues to make gains against the euro and other currencies. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson takes a look at what’s happening with Maggie Lake of CNN.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Get Injured Often? It Could Be In Your Genes.

(Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images)

Are you one of those people who constantly ends up on crutches? Friends say you should be covered in bubble wrap? Well it could be that it’s not your fault. In fact, it could be your genes.

A new review article published in the Journal of Sports Medicine concludes that genetics play a key role in a person’s risk of suffering from sports injuries. That holds true for athletes of all ages and all abilities, from weekend warriors to Olympians.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

What The 'Blurred Lines' Verdict Means For The Music Industry

Musicians Robin Thicke (left) and Pharrell Williams perform onstage during the 2013 BET Awards at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on June 30, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for BET)

On Tuesday, a California federal jury delivered its verdict after eight days of trial testimony examining whether Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams’ song “Blurred Lines” infringed on the copyright for Marvin Gaye’s 1977 hit “Got to Give It Up.”

The Gaye estate walked away with a victory and Thicke and Williams were ordered to pay more than $7 million in damages, plus profits attributable to infringement. It is a sad day for the “Blurred Lines” duo, but what could the ruling mean for the music industry?

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Parallels
2:24 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

As Palm Oil Farms Expand, It's A Race To Save Indonesia's Orangutans

A baby orangutan wearing a diaper swings through the trees at the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Program outside Medan, capital of Indonesia's North Sumatra province. The program takes mostly orphaned orangutans, nurses them back to health and releases them back into the wild.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 9:40 pm

On a hillside on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, about 50 red-haired refugees are learning how to be orangutans once again. The country's booming palm oil industry has encroached on their habitats, leaving many of them homeless and orphaned.

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Code Switch
2:08 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Claude Sitton, 'Dean Of The Race Beat,' Dies At 89

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 4:56 pm

It may be that Claude Fox Sitton so outraged the white Southern segregationists he reported on throughout the civil rights movement because, by all appearances, he could have been standing beside them instead of writing about them in the New York Times.

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Science
2:02 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Think Man-Sized Swimming Centipede — And Be Glad It's A Fossil

Reconstruction of the giant filter feeder, scooping up a plankton cloud. Aegirocassis benmoulae was one of the biggest arthropods that ever lived. Family members include today's insects, spiders and lobsters.
Marianne Collins/ArtofFact

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 9:40 pm

If living long and prospering is a measure of success, then the arthropods are life's winners. These are the most common form of life: insects, spiders, crustaceans and centipedes, to name but a few.

And now scientists have their hands on the remains of one of the first ever. It lived 480 million years ago, and it was big and strange.

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Goats and Soda
1:28 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

He's 14. He Was A Child Soldier. He's Suicidal. How Can He Be Saved?

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 4:35 pm

The boy was abducted by the Lord's Liberation Army to serve as a child soldier when he was 7. He had been forced to kill his uncle with a machete.

At 14, he escaped and made his way back to his parents. But he wasn't himself.

He couldn't sleep at night, and during the day, he'd run around the village screaming. He was fighting back thoughts of suicide.

"No one knew what to do with him," says Peter Oketayot, a mental health counselor with the nonprofit Vivo in Northern Uganda, who eventually treated the teenager.

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Music
12:27 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

50 Years Of The Hollies

Groups celebrating 50 years of existence aren't too common, which is why the media generally makes a big deal out of it. But one such group had their 50th anniversary in 2014 without many people in the U.S. hearing about it. The Hollies, though, are often overlooked in this country because they weren't virtuosos or showmen, and because the American disdain for pop meant that they didn't have the kind of big hits they had in England. Fresh Air music historian Ed Ward has their story today.

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Author Interviews
12:27 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

A Writer Moves To 'Bettyville' To Care For His Elderly Mom

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
12:09 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

U.S. College Finds Priceless Coin Collection — In Its Own Library

Coins from the Thomas Lockwood Collection were recently found to be rare and priceless. From a description by the University at Buffalo, from top to bottom: A gold aureus of the Roman emperor Otho; a tetradrachm of Athens; a tetradrachm of Alexander the Great; a silver tetradrachm of Syracuse (Sicily); a gold aureus of the emperor Nero; and a gold octodrachm of Arsinoe II."
Douglas Levere University at Buffalo

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 2:54 pm

Dozens of Greek and Roman coins are part of a collection of ancient coins that was donated to the University at Buffalo in 1935. But it was only recently that the school realized how special they are.

For years, the coins sat on a shelf in the school's library, mostly ignored — until a classics professor asked specialists to come to the archive and examine them.

"I must have been the first person to touch them in almost 40 years," says Philip Kiernan, an assistant professor who became curious about the collection after he heard a rumor about it in 2010.

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All Tech Considered
11:55 am
Wed March 11, 2015

The App Of The Moment: Meerkat Tests Our Desire To Share Live Video

Meerkat, a live-video streaming app, has been this week's tech media darling.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 4:08 pm

After Jon Ward happened upon Meerkat, the newest live-video streaming app, he couldn't stop thinking about the reporting potential. As the senior political correspondent for Yahoo News, Ward knew the technology involved is anything but revolutionary. Yet there was something captivating about Meerkat.

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Shots - Health News
11:37 am
Wed March 11, 2015

The Boss Can Force You To Buy Company's Health Insurance

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 10:09 am

Under the health law, large employers that don't offer their full-time workers comprehensive, affordable health insurance face a fine. But some employers are taking it a step further and requiring workers to buy the company insurance, whether they want it or not.

Many workers may have no choice but to comply.

Some workers are upset. One disgruntled reader wrote to Kaiser Health News: "My employer is requiring me to purchase health insurance and is automatically taking the premium out of my paycheck even though I don't want to sign up for health insurance. Is this legal?"

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Deceptive Cadence
11:09 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Let Ethan Hawke Introduce You To A Fine, Forgotten Pianist

Pianist Seymour Bernstein in conversation with actor and filmmaker Ethan Hawke.
Courtesy of IFC Films/Sundance Selects

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 10:15 am

Ethan Hawke might strike you as an unlikely guide to classical music. But in directing his first documentary, Seymour: An Introduction, he created an intriguing and ultimately profoundly moving tribute to a largely unknown artist, 86-year-old pianist Seymour Bernstein.

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The Salt
10:40 am
Wed March 11, 2015

From Ancient Sumeria To Chipotle Tacos, Cumin Has Spiced Up The World

The cuisines of the classical world made use of cumin both as a flavoring and a drug.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 10:44 am

I first encountered cumin in suburban New Jersey around 1988. Indian food was just starting to penetrate the suburbs, and a trip to the new Indian restaurant in the next town had, literally, the whiff of adventure about it.

As I took in the many new tastes and aromas from curries and kormas, one stood out: what I deemed the "the sweaty shirt spice," or cumin.

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The Salt
10:12 am
Wed March 11, 2015

How Big Sugar Steered Research On A 'Tooth Decay Vaccine'

Garry Gay Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 2:18 pm

Sugar can promote tooth decay. Duh.

So if you want good oral health, it makes sense to brush and floss regularly and perhaps limit the amount of sugar you consume. Right?

In 2015, this may seem fairly obvious.

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Shots - Health News
9:45 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Documents Detail Sugar Industry Efforts To Direct Medical Research

Pink Sherbert Photography/Flickr

Back in 2007, Christin Kearns attended a conference for dentists like herself to learn about links between diabetes and gum disease.

She was handed a government pamphlet titled, "How to Talk to Patients about Diabetes," and was surprised to find that the diet advice didn't mention reducing sugar intake. She said it made her wonder if the sugar industry "somehow impacted what the government can or cannot say about diet advice for diabetics?"

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Iraqi Forces Reportedly Enter Tikrit In Push Against ISIS

Iraq's push into Tikrit follows its retaking of the nearby town of al-Alam on Tuesday. There, a woman welcomed a relative who is fighting with a militia that's backing Iraqi troops.
Thaier al-Sudani Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 6:07 pm

Iraqi troops and militia fighters are reportedly inside the city of Tikrit, the city that has been held by the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or ISIS, since last June. Officials and witnesses say the Iraqis now control part of northern Tikrit.

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Wed March 11, 2015

French Highway Heist: Armed Thieves Take Millions In Jewels

A French gendarme stands guard Wednesday in Avallon after thieves attacked two armored vans carrying jewels overnight.
Jeff Pachoud AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 5:48 pm

French police say two armored trucks carrying jewels and other items worth some $9.5 million were seized by more than a dozen armed attackers Wednesday, in a midnight heist that took place on the A6 highway that runs between Paris and Lyon.

Authorities were hunting for the thieves Wednesday, focusing on an area around the crime that took place about 140 miles southeast of Paris.

The heist was timed to coincide with the trucks' stop at a toll booth, where gunmen overcame the shipment's drivers, who were reportedly unarmed. The drivers were left uninjured.

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NPR Ed
8:44 am
Wed March 11, 2015

The Teenage Brain: Spock Vs. Captain Kirk

Imagine the adolescent brain as the bridge from Star Trek's USS Enterprise, host to a constant tug of war between the impulsive Captain Kirk (limbic system) and the reasonable Mr. Spock (prefrontal cortex).
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 5:43 pm

This story was written for the series, "Being 12: The Year Everything Changes," from member station WNYC.

If adolescence has a poster child, it's a teenager. In a car. Smoking, drinking, and driving badly while also, somehow, having sex in the back seat.

But changes in the brain that lead to the famously bad choices of adolescence don't start at 16 or 17 years old. They start around 11 or 12 and the beginning of puberty.

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The Two-Way
7:55 am
Wed March 11, 2015

2 Oklahoma Students Seen In Racist Fraternity Video Apologize

University of Oklahoma students march to the now-closed Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house during a rally against racism Tuesday. Two former members of the fraternity have apologized for their roles in a video that showed them singing a racist chant.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 1:04 pm

Two men who were in a video of Sigma Alpha Epsilon members singing a racist chant have apologized for their actions, with one of the now-former fraternity brothers saying he had learned "a devastating lesson."

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Goats and Soda
6:03 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Happy World Plumbing Day! We Celebrate By Interviewing ... A Plumber

Fred Schilling has made many trips to Haiti to fix pipes and train Haitians.
Courtesy of Plumbers Without Borders

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 4:21 pm

After a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, help poured in from the U.S. Doctors came to battle the cholera epidemic, agencies handed out food, and nonprofits provided shelter.

And then there were plumbers.

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Around the Nation
5:53 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Lost Love Letter Resurfaces After 70 Years

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 6:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:41 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Search Continues For Military Black Hawk That Crashed With 11 On Board

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 12:12 pm

Update at 6:13 p.m. ET

The search continues for an Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter that crashed late Tuesday night off the Florida coast. Seven Marines and four members of the Louisiana National Guard were on a routine nighttime training mission at Eglin Air Force Base.

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Around the Nation
5:32 am
Wed March 11, 2015

D.C. Court Orders Row House Resident Not To Smoke

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 6:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
4:32 am
Wed March 11, 2015

9 Iraqi Interpreters Sue U.S. Government Over Visa Delays

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 5:38 pm

During a decade of war, U.S. troops relied on interpreters — thousands of Iraqis and Afghans — who worked and often fought alongside Americans.

Many of them were promised visas to the U.S. but they have been waiting for years with no answer. Now, nine Iraqis are suing the U.S. government to get their status resolved.

All the Iraqis in the lawsuit go by code names because of ongoing threats to their lives.

Plaintiff Alpha was in an ambush with U.S. troops and got shot in the back, but he continued to work with the U.S. military after he recovered.

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Politics
4:02 am
Wed March 11, 2015

In Retrospect, Clinton Says She Should Have Used Separate Emails

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 3:46 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:02 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Critics Take Aim At Port Of Seattle's Lease With Shell Oil

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 6:41 am

Copyright 2015 Puget Sound Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.kuow.org.

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