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4:00 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Lava Spills Onto Private Property In Hawaii, Closing In On Homes

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 7:12 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Africa
4:00 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Amid Negotiations With Boko Haram In Nigeria, Violence Continues

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 7:12 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Ed
4:00 am
Wed October 29, 2014

50 Great Teachers: Socrates, The Ancient World's Teaching Superstar

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 8:28 am

Today, NPR Ed kicks off a yearlong series: 50 Great Teachers.

We're starting this celebration of teaching with Socrates, the superstar teacher of the ancient world. He was sentenced to death more than 2,400 years ago for "impiety" and "corrupting" the minds of the youth of Athens.

But Socrates' ideas helped form the foundation of Western philosophy and the scientific method of inquiry. And his question-and-dialogue-based teaching style lives on in many classrooms as the Socratic method.

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NPR News Investigations
4:00 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Red Cross 'Diverted Assets' During Storms' Aftermath To Focus On Image

In the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, a former Red Cross official says, as many as 40 percent of the organization's emergency vehicles were assigned for public relations purposes. This photo, which shows one of the trucks in Long Island, N.Y., in January 2013, is one example of the many publicity photos taken by the Red Cross.
Les Stone American Red Cross

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 9:05 am

Within hours of Superstorm Sandy slamming the East Coast two years ago, Americans opened their wallets to help — donating millions to the first charity that came to mind: the American Red Cross.

President Obama, like most elected officials and celebrities, vouched for the organization, encouraging people to give.

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Shots - Health News
4:00 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Emory Hospital Shares Lessons Learned On Ebola Care

Ebola patient Amber Vinson arrived by ambulance at Emory University Hospital on Oct. 15. Now healthy, Vinson was discharged from the hospital Tuesday.
Kevin C. Cox Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 10:56 pm

Atlanta's Emory University Hospital got the first call at the end of July. An American doctor who'd been treating Ebola patients in Liberia was now terribly sick with the virus himself. In just 72 hours, Dr. Kent Brantly would be coming through Emory's doors.

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Law
2:49 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Can Authorities Cut Off Utilities And Pose As Repairmen To Search A Home?

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 7:50 am

Some legal cases do more than raise eyebrows — they push the legal envelope to change the law. Such is a federal case in Las Vegas now working its way through the courts. The question is whether federal agents can disrupt service to a house and then, masquerading as helpful technicians, gain entry to covertly search the premises in hopes of finding evidence that might later justify a search warrant.

The defendants in this case are not your everyday Americans. They are, in fact, Chinese gamblers who were staying in Las Vegas at Caesar's Palace earlier this year.

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The Two-Way
5:35 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

WATCH: Unmanned Antares Rocket Explodes Shortly After Takeoff

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 9:01 pm

A unmanned rocket carrying 5,000 pounds of supplies and experiments to the International Space Station exploded shortly after blastoff on Tuesday at NASA's facility on Wallops Island, Va.

The rocket was made by Orbital Sciences, which was contracted by NASA to ship supplies up to the International Space Station.

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National Security
5:30 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Security Beefed Up At Federal Buildings Across U.S.

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 7:27 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:23 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Firm Buys Big Bike-Share Service; Expansion And Higher Rates Seen

A Citi Bike user pedals off from a bicycle station. The company that owns the service in New York and other cities has been sold, after suffering problems tied to its supply chain and the weather.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 1:29 pm

Alta Bicycle Share, the company that manages bike-sharing programs in New York, Washington, Chicago, San Francisco and other cities, has been sold to an investment group that includes executives in fitness club operator Equinox and real estate firm Related Companies. The new owners say they'll expand the service in New York, where customers now take more than 1 million trips a month on Citi Bike.

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The Two-Way
5:19 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

U.S. Beefs Up Security At Some Federal Buildings

The U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

The United States is beefing up security at some federal installations across the country, the Department of Homeland Security said on Tuesday.

In a statement, DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson said it would not detail the changes because they were "law-enforcement sensitive." But, he said, the new measures will enhance Federal Protective Service presence and security at government buildings in D.C. and across the country.

Johnson went on:

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The Salt
5:01 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Who Should Pay To Fix The World's Salt-Damaged Soils?

Farms outside Baghdad as seen from a U.S. Army Blackhawk helicopter. Much of Iraq's soil has a high salt content because of flooding and poor drainage.
Jim Gordon U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/Flickr

Imagine losing about 5,000 acres, or 15 average-sized farms in Iowa, every day. That's how much productive farmland has succumbed to salt damage in the last 20 or so years, according to a paper published Tuesday by a group of international researchers. And, they say, all that degraded land is costing farmers $27.3 billion a year.

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Parallels
4:34 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

With A Soft Approach On Gangs, Nicaragua Eschews Violence

A statue of Jesus Christ called "Cristo Rey" is prominently located near the entrance of the Dimitrov neighborhood, which used to be so violent, people joked the Christ was being held up at gunpoint.
Juan Carlos for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 6:59 pm

As the sun sinks just below the horizon, Jorge Sandoval strolls across a dusty street.

He's a small man in his 50s, who runs volunteer patrols. The neighborhood is poor. The houses are cobbled together out of leftover wood and pieces of metal.

Two years ago, Sandoval says, these streets used to be desolate and controlled by gangs.

"They would shoot at each other at all hours," Sandoval says. "Suddenly you'd find someone injured, someone innocent, because they just didn't care."

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Goats and Soda
4:23 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

No Hand-Washing, Spotty Temperature-Taking At Liberia's Airport

NPR producer Rolando Arrieta approaches the Ebola screening station at the airport in Monrovia, Liberia.
Michaeleen Doucleff NPR

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 10:28 am

Ebola screening for passengers flying out of Monrovia's airport on Monday night wasn't functioning like a well-oiled machine. Parts of it were chaotic and slightly concerning.

After 10 days of reporting in Liberia, we arrived at the airport to take two of the same flights that Thomas Eric Duncan took last month: Monrovia to Brussels and then on to Dulles in Virginia. There were three of us: me, another reporter and a producer.

Before we went inside the terminal, a woman from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention greeted us outside.

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Law
4:22 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Former Band Member On Trial In Florida A&M Hazing Death

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 5:30 pm

Three years after Florida A&M student Robert Champion died after a beating on a bus, a member of the university's marching band is on trial for manslaughter. Prosecutors say it was hazing. The defense says it was a tradition more akin to an athletic accomplishment — and one Champion joined in willingly.

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History
4:22 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Jonas Salk's Polio Vaccine Trials Would Be Hard To Repeat Today

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 5:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Code Switch
4:22 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Some St. Louis Teachers Address Ferguson With Lessons On Race

Vincent Flewellen leads a lesson on Ferguson during his eighth-grade multicultural studies course at Ladue Middle School.
Tim Lloyd/St. Louis Public Radio

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 7:21 pm

This story is a consolidated version of a three-part series by St. Louis Public Radio that profiles how issues of race and class sparked by Ferguson are being discussed in St. Louis-area schools.

It was early September and Vincent Flewellen had just wrapped up his day teaching at Ladue Middle School, in an affluent suburb about 13 miles south of where protests erupted in Ferguson.

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Politics
4:22 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Constituent Services Give Voters Something To Remember

Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., poses with constituent Noelle Hunter. In a campaign ad, Hunter explains that McConnell helped get her daughter back from Mali after a custody battle.
AP

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 5:49 pm

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Shots - Health News
4:22 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Home Health Workers Struggle For Better Pay And Health Insurance

Home health care workers Jasmine Almodovar (far right) and Artheta Peters (center) take part in a Cleveland rally for higher pay on Sept. 4.
Sarah Jane Tribble WCPN, Ideastream

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 3:09 pm

Holly Dawson believes her job is a calling.

She is one of about 2 million home care workers in the country. The jobs come with long hours and low pay.

Each workday, Dawson drives through the Cleveland suburbs to help people take their medicines, bathe and do the dishes. She also takes time to lend a sympathetic ear.

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The Two-Way
4:17 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

FBI Spoofs News Story To Send Spyware To Suspect

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 7:06 pm

It was already known that the FBI uses spyware to investigate people — that was clear in federal documents obtained by the Electronic Frontier Foundation. What hasn't been fully appreciated until now was the lengths to which the FBI will go to infect a target's computer.

"Presumably, your typical Nigerian scam email offering $10 million dollars isn't going to work," says Christopher Soghoian of the ACLU.

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Shots - Health News
3:33 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Blood Test For Ebola Doesn't Catch Infection Early

Magnified 25,000 times, this digitally colorized scanning electron micrograph shows Ebola virus particles (green) budding from an infected cell (blue).
CDC/NIAD

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 7:48 am

In an ideal world, health care workers returning from West Africa would get a quick blood test to prove they aren't carrying the Ebola virus. A test like that would likely put to rest some of the anxiety surrounding these doctors, nurses and scientists.

Unfortunately, even the best blood test in the world can't do that.

The test uses a technology called PCR, for polymerase chain reaction. It can detect extraordinarily small traces of genetic material from the Ebola virus.

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NPR Ed
3:31 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

A Helping Hand To High Achievers

Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg was the No. 4 philanthropist in 2013, The Chronicle of Philanthropy reported.
Bebeto Matthews AP

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 11:15 am

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg wants to see more low-income high achievers graduate from college. Tuesday, his charitable group, Bloomberg Philanthropies, announced that it has partnered with several colleges and nonprofits to "expand college access and completion" for these promising students.

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The Salt
3:16 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

To Make Bread, Watch The Dough, Not The Recipe

Sourdough loaves made by Fromartz with a bolted white flour from Anson Mills in South Carolina that he says reminded him of the wheat he'd tasted in southern France.
Samuel Fromartz

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 9:29 am

Journalist Samuel Fromartz works at home on a quiet street near the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C. He's a journalist, and editor-in-chief of the Food and Environment Reporting Network.

On a recent morning, I went to visit him and found several unread newspapers piled on his front step. "I've been a little busy," Fromartz explains.

He's not too busy to make bread, though.

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The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Obama: Ebola Policies Should Support Health Care Workers On Front Lines

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 4:14 pm

U.S. polices on Ebola should be driven by science and should avoid discouraging American health care workers from going overseas to help curb Ebola outbreaks, President Obama said on Tuesday.

"We don't want to discourage our health care workers from going to the front lines," Obama said. When workers come back from West Africa, they should be thanked for their "incredible dedication."

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Author Interviews
2:40 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

A Candid Memoir From Comedian Amy Poehler? 'Yes Please'

Amy Poehler plays Leslie Knope on Parks and Recreation, which will air its final season next year. Poehler says, "It's a privilege in television to be able to have a proper goodbye."
Colleen Hayes NBC

When comedian Amy Poehler was in her 20s, she read her boyfriend's journal and found out that he didn't think she was pretty.

"It was almost like an itch being scratched, which was, 'Aha! I knew that you didn't think I was pretty!' ... And then it was followed by a real crash because ... my ego was bruised," Poehler tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

Poehler says it taught her that the earlier you figure out your "currency," the happier you'll be. For Poehler, that meant not leaning on her looks to be successful.

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

YouTube Considers Offering Subscriptions

A picture shows a You Tube logo on December 4, 2012 during LeWeb Paris 2012 in Saint-Denis near Paris. Le Web is Europe's largest tech conference, bringing together the entrepreneurs, leaders and influencers who shape the future of the internet. (Eric Piermont/AFP/Getty Images)

Google’s YouTube may soon offer users a subscription that allows them to watch videos free of advertisements, according to the Wall Street Journal, as other companies that require payment, from Netflix to Hulu and Amazon, continue to draw more viewers.

CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger joins Here & Now host Robin Young to discuss this potential move.

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Boko Haram Abducts More Nigerian School Girls

People demonstrate calling on the Nigerian government to rescue girls taken from a secondary school in Chibok region, in the city of Abuja, Nigeria . Days after Nigeria's military raised hopes by announcing Islamic extremists have agreed to a cease-fire, Boko Haram is still fighting and there is no word about 219 schoolgirls held hostage for six months. Officials had said talks with Nigeria's Islamic extremist rebels would resume in neighboring Chad this week, but there was no confirmation that negotiations had resumed by Wednesday. (AP Photo/Olamikan Gbemiga File)

Recent headlines out of West Africa have been flooded with the news of the Ebola outbreak, shifting the attention away from the social media campaign #BringBackOurGirls, aimed at rescuing nearly 300 Nigerian schoolgirls abducted by the Islamist group Boko Haram.

On Friday, Nigeria’s Foreign Minister said that negotiations to get the girls back were underway and that their release was imminent.

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Cooking With The Fruit Of Fall

Go beyond the apple this winter: try cooking with figs, persimmons and pears. (Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

Fall is in full swing and Here & Now resident chef  Kathy Gunst is thinking about fall fruit.

Apples are abundant, but so are pears, pomegranates, persimmons and figs. Kathy brings suggestions for livening up a spicy salad with fruit, as well as poaching pears and using pomegranate juice and seeds to liven up fall carrots.

Kathy shares some of her favorite recipes featuring fall fruits:

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Parallels
1:55 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

As Great Barrier Reef Ails, Australia Scrambles To Save It

These scuba divers are among the 2 million tourists who visit the Great Barrier Reef each year. They contribute about $5.6 billion to Australia's economy, according to the Queensland government.
Steve Dorsey for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 6:37 pm

The Great Barrier Reef has long been in trouble. One Australian government report in 2012 estimated the reef had lost more than half its coral since 1985.

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Music
1:38 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

The Mysterious Case of Arthur Conley, Otis Redding's Protege

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Arthur Conley was Otis Redding's protege, his special project, and had a number of hits before mysteriously disappearing. Our rock historian Ed Ward has uncovered what he can about Redding's story.

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Parallels
1:29 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Why Does Saudi Arabia Seem So Comfortable With Falling Oil Prices?

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks with Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud as the Saudi ambassador to the United States, Adel al-Jubeir, listens before a meeting at the Royal Palace in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia, on Sept. 11.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 5:30 pm

Oil prices continue to tumble: down about 25 percent since mid-June to a four-year low, and many analysts believe there is no end in sight.

While that's good for consumers and most businesses in the U.S., the falling price is bad for oil-exporting countries such as Russia, Venezuela, Iran and Iraq.

And blame — or credit — for the plummeting prices is falling squarely on Saudi Arabia.

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