Presidential Race
7:38 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Update From Ohio: Ballot Dispute

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Ohio is possibly the most important state in this presidential race. A challenge over early voting there has turned into a dispute over provisional ballots.

The Two-Way
7:37 am
Tue November 6, 2012

In The Rockaways, People Were Voting In The Dark

Debris lay in front of homes in a Rockaway neighborhood of the borough of Queens, New York, on Monday. The Manhattan skyline is seen in the background. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
Craig Ruttle AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 10:32 am

"Here in the rockaways, people are voting in the dark. There are no lights, there is no heat."

That's how NPR's Robert Smith described the situation in the Rockaways, which is in one of the boroughs hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy in New York.

"There was supposed to be a generator running to run this entire polling place but when poll workers got there in the morning, they discovered it had no fuel," Robert told our Newscast unit.

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It's All Politics
7:16 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Voting Queue Etiquette: Hey, Buddy, That's Out Of Line!

South Floridians stood in long lines Sunday during the last day of early voting in Miami.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 9:17 am

For most of us, Election Day marks a welcome end to months of relentless political ads and partisan bickering. You show up at your polling place, run the gantlet of sign-wielding campaign volunteers, and join your fellow Americans in long lines that inch toward the voting booth.

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The Two-Way
7:08 am
Tue November 6, 2012

It's Election Day: 10 Headlines That Tell Today's Story

A woman is accompanied by her dog as she casts her vote on in South Philadelphia, Pa.
Jessica Kourkounis Getty Images

It's finally here! It's Election Day. After months of campaigning and some $2 billion spent by both campaigns, it means political junkies will finally get some answers and those who aren't too enamored with Washington, will stop seeing ads on TV.

With that, here are 10 headlines that tell today's story:

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Election 2012
6:46 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Sandy Likely To Affect New York Voter Turnout

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The triumph in some parts of the country this morning is that people are able to vote at all. Just over a week after Hurricane Sandy slammed ashore, people are voting today in New Jersey.

And in New York City, NPR's Robert Smith is in the Borough of Queens, part of New York City. He's on the line. Robert, what have you seen today?

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Around the Nation
6:30 am
Tue November 6, 2012

N.J. Gov. Christie Chats With 'The Boss'

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. New Jersey Governor Chris Christie finally met his state's favorite son. He attended more than 100 Bruce Springsteen concerts without meeting the devoted Democrat. But after the Republican governor toured storm damage with President Obama, the two embraced. Campaigning with Springsteen, the president later put the two men on the phone, matching the Boss with the governor who once sang Springsteen music in a TV appearance.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THUNDER ROAD")

Around the Nation
6:20 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Boca Raton's Mayor Wants A Spelling Change

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. When the Florida city of Boca Raton hosted the last presidential debate, even the previous debate's moderator mispronounced it. Outsiders do tend to call it Boca Raton, like baton, possibly because it dropped the E on the end decades ago. Now the mayor wants the E back in the name. She joked to the South Florida Sun Sentinel: We'll put you in jail like Al Capone if you don't say it like Boca Raton. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

It's All Politics
6:03 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Guide For The Day: An Election Day Timeline

Voters fill out their ballots on the first day of early voting on Oct. 27 in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

The finish line is in sight as voters make their final decisions on Election Day. Here's a guide to key times of the day across the nation. Stay with NPR throughout the day as we follow the presidential race and key battles that will determine control of the House and Senate.

Join NPR to hear live coverage, which begins at 8 p.m. EST on NPR.org and many member stations.

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It's All Politics
6:01 am
Tue November 6, 2012

The Battle For Congress: Senate And House Races To Watch

Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., shakes hands with Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren at their Oct. 1 debate in Lowell, Mass. The race is one of a handful of contests that could determine party control of the Senate.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 6:02 pm

For Republicans itching to regain control of the Senate, Tuesday's election presents a rare opportunity. Only 10 GOP incumbents are on the ballot, compared with nearly two dozen Democrats and independents who caucus with them.

That means the magic number for Republicans is low. They need only a net gain of three or four seats to take over the Senate — and, assuming they keep the U.S. House of Representatives, consolidate their influence on Capitol Hill. Democrats need to pick up 25 seats to seize the House, a goal that political analysts consider all but out of reach.

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It's All Politics
5:58 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Voters To Settle Tight And Turbulent Presidential Battle

Supporters attend a Mitt Romney rally Monday in Columbus, Ohio.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 7:08 am

As Americans go to the polls, one of the closest presidential races in years may be determined by a state in the Midwest and a hurricane named Sandy.

After a campaign that has cost some $6 billion, the two candidates are in the same place they started: with President Obama a smidgen ahead of challenger Mitt Romney, so close that differences are in most cases statistically insignificant.

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