The Two-Way
7:06 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Book News: Author And Wife Of Amazon CEO Defends Online Retailer

Mackenzie Bezos and Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com attend the "Schiaparelli And Prada: Impossible Conversations" Costume Institute Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Dimitrios Kambouris Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

  • Mackenzie Bezos, the author of the novel Traps and the wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, defended the company publicly for the first time to The Times [paywall protected], calling it "great for authors and books." She herself is not published by Amazon.
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Arts and Culture
7:01 am
Wed April 3, 2013

The Latino Experience in Iowa: Many Cultures Over Many Years

Family posed in front of car, Holy City, Bettendorf, Iowa, 1920s
Iowa Digital Library University of Iowa Libraries

Latino immigration has helped to shape - and re-shape - Iowa communities for more than a century. Dr. Omar Valerio-Jimenez, associate professor of history at the University of Iowa, joins Sarah McCammon to discuss "The Latino Experience in Iowa." That's the title of a lecture he's giving as part of a series on race and gender at Mt. Mercy University in Cedar Rapids.

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Wed April 3, 2013

'Fired' Could Be Next F-Word For Rutgers Coach Seen Berating Players

Rutgers men's basketball coach Mike Rice during a game in March.
Chris Szagola CSM/Landov

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 11:38 am

(We most recently updated the top of this post at 11:10 a.m. ET.)

Responding to outrage from around the nation after videotape of men's basketball coach Mike Rice assaulting his players and spewing homophobic slurs at them was aired on ESPN, New Jersey's Rutgers University fired Rice at mid-morning Wednesday.

The 44-year-old "visibly distraught" Rice, WABC in New York reports, told reporters earlier in the day that:

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Around the Nation
6:23 am
Wed April 3, 2013

911 Dispatcher Asks Her Mom To Rescue Kayaker

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 7:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Raedyn Grasseth might get the award for most creative 911 operator. The Washington state woman dispatched an officer to rescue a stranded kayaker on the Colombia River. The boater was in powerful currents, hanging onto a pile of logs. Grasseth had a feeling she might not be reached in time. And so, she called an experienced kayaker who happened to live nearby, her mother. The dispatcher's mom paddled out and within minutes brought the woman to safety.

The Two-Way
5:52 am
Wed April 3, 2013

North Korea's Brinksmanship: Same As Before, More Dangerous Or Both?

Turned back: South Korean trucks returned Wednesday after being barred from entering a joint industrial complex just across the border inside North Korea.
Park Jin-hee Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 9:47 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Louisa Lim and Steve Inskeep discuss North Korea

Wednesday's news from the Korean peninsula, where tensions seem to rise each day:

"North Korea ... barred South Korean workers from entering a jointly run factory park just over the heavily armed border in the North, officials in Seoul said."

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Asia
5:45 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Auto Industry Stalls In Japan

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 7:19 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's look now at a vital part of the Japanese economy: the auto industry. While vehicle sales in the United States last month were at the highest level since August of 2007, Japanese auto sales decreased by nearly 16 percent. That is just the latest in a six-month slide for auto sales in Japan. In today's business bottom line, NPR's Sonari Glinton looks at Japan's faltering domestic auto sector.

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NPR Story
5:22 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Remembering Robert Remini

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:20 am

A former House historian, prolific biographer and professor emeritus at the University of Illinois, Chicago, Robert Remini spent a lifetime exploring handwritten letters and other documents that illuminate the 19th century. He won a National Book Award for the three-volume The Life of Andrew Jackson.

NPR Story
5:22 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Restaurants Take Risks For Big Rewards At Phoenix Airport

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 7:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

If you travel a lot you're probably doing a lot of meals in airports, maybe fast-food by Gate C31 or the chain coffee place nearby. Well, one of the busiest airports in the country is now bringing in local restaurants.

As Peter O'Dowd reports from member station KJZZ in Phoenix, these small businesses are taking a risk for a shot at a big reward.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

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Politics
3:34 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Outrage Alone Won't Advance Gun Control Measures

President Obama urged Congress to take action on measures to protect children from gun violence while speaking in the East Room of the White House last week. Standing with Obama are Vice President Joe Biden and, according to the White House, law enforcement officials, victims of gun violence and others, whom the White House did not want to name.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 7:42 am

President Obama is trying to regain some traction for federal gun control measures by visiting states that are moving forward on their own.

On Wednesday, the president speaks in Colorado, where lawmakers recently passed a series of bills requiring background checks for all gun purchases and limiting the size of ammunition magazines.

Obama would like to see similar measures adopted nationwide. But if Colorado serves as an inspiration for the president, it also provides a cautionary tale.

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Tina Brown's Must-Reads
2:06 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Tina Brown's Must Reads: Women Vs. The World

Malala Yousafzai, targeted by the Taliban for her advocacy in favor of education for girls and young women in her native Pakistan, will be honored at the opening night of Tina Brown's Women in the World Summit.
AP

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:39 am

Tina Brown, editor of the Daily Beast and Newsweek, joins NPR's Steve Inskeep again for an occasional feature Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth. She talks about what she's been reading and offers recommendations.

This month, as Brown prepares for her annual Women in the World Summit in New York City, her reading suggestions address just that: the role of women in the developing world.

Malala And The Media

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