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Talk of Iowa
9:07 am
Wed July 25, 2012

The Last River Rat

Kenny Salwey, 1981

Kenny Salwey lives along the upper Mississippi River. He hunts, fishes, traps, and writes; while he lives off the land in a cabin he built with his own two hands. He’s known as the "last river rat". Host Charity Nebbe speaks with him about his life, the river he’s built his life around, and his latest book, Muskrat for Supper.

Agriculture/Harvest Public Media
11:24 am
Tue July 24, 2012

My Farm Roots: Tom Karst

Tom Karst feels right at home on a summer morning at a farmer's market in Overland Park, Kan.
Donna Vestal Harvest Public Media

In this week's installment, we meet Tom Karst. He's the national editor for "The Packer," a trade newspaper covering the fruit and vegetable industry. For more than 25 years, he’s been reporting on issues of importance to the produce industry, including immigration, farm policy, and food safety.

To explore more "My Farm Roots" stories, and share your own, visit: http://harvestpublicmedia.org/myfarmroots

Arts & Culture
7:15 am
Tue July 24, 2012

"Papergirl" Project Rethinks Street Art

Some of the works were displayed in the Figge Art Museum lobby for one day only.
Clare Roth IPR

If you’re walking down the street this evening in Davenport, someone might hand you a work of art. "Papergirl" is an art movement where participants collect artworks from community members, roll it up newspaper-style, and distribute it to random passers-by via bicycles, like the paperboys of old.

River to River
2:59 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Summer Series: Prison Communities

Iowa State Penitentiary in Ft. Madison
Alex Heuer

The Iowa Department of Corrections operates nine institutions throughout the state, and together, they employ more than 3,000 people to supervise more than 8,000 adult inmates. On today's "River to River" we continue our summer series on Iowa towns with a look at how prisons, or correctional facilities, shape the communities where they are located.

Talk of Iowa
2:46 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Summer Series: College Towns

Downtown Iowa City
Emily Woodbury

A town that is home to a college or university is always changing.  There are always new students, new faculty, new staff, and the population ebbs and flows from semester to semester.  On today's "Talk of Iowa" we continue our summer series on Iowa towns and cities with a look at college towns.  The pros, the cons, the economics and the history.

River to River
10:50 am
Mon July 23, 2012

Innovative Iowa Businesses

Mark Ginsberg next to his 3D printer. He's holding a printed wrench and bicycle chain / Ben Kieffer

Our area is home to a host of unique and innovative entrepreneurs. Ben talks with Mark Ginsberg, owner of M.C. Ginsberg Jewelers in Iowa City, about how he is utilizing 3D printing technology in his jewelry business and in other areas of the city.

Later, Chad Dutler, owner of Shrimp 59 in Holstein, talks about what made him embark on the shrimp farming business. 

Talk of Iowa
10:03 am
Mon July 23, 2012

Reinventing Education

dcJohn / Flickr

At no time in history have schools been asked to do so much. Author, businessman, and attorney, Jamie Vollmer, experiences the challenges first hand in his book Schools Can't Do It Alone. Charity talks with Vollmer about the struggles education leaders face and how they can redevelop the system to increase student success.

River to River
9:51 am
Fri July 20, 2012

Cold Cases

Early one morning in 1995, anchorwoman Jodi Huisentruit didn’t show up for work at her Mason City TV station.

Her disappearance is one of Iowa’s most discussed unsolved cases. Listen back to host, Ben Kieffer’s, discussion with Beth Bednar about her book on the case called Dead Air.

Then, a look into how state law enforcement goes about investigating dozens of cold cases.

Talk of Iowa
9:18 am
Fri July 20, 2012

Horticulture Day: Trees

Derschueler/Wikimedia Commons

The drought continues throughout much of the state. On today's Horticulture Day Richard Jauron, horticulturist with the Iowa State University Extension, and Forester Mark Vitosh, talk about the stress the lack of rain has placed on trees.

Agriculture/Harvest Public Media
7:38 am
Fri July 20, 2012

Hoop Barns Protect Cattle From Heat

Row of six hoop barns at Grand Meadow Feeders near Washta
Rick Fredericksen Iowa Public Radio

Crops are not the only things wilting in the sweltering summer of 2012; cattle, the largest animals, on the farm are also under stress.

Some cattle producers are protecting their herds by putting them hoop barns, which are gaining acceptance across the Midwest. The simple structures are made from stretching fabric over strong metal arches, or hoops, providing vital shade and protection from rain, snow or sun.

Tanner Rowe, a cattle producer near Dallas Canter, Iowa, has found hoop barns can give cattle a much-needed break from sweltering heat.

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Politics
6:27 am
Fri July 20, 2012

Iowa Secretary of State Checking Voter Rolls for Non-Citizen Immigrants

League of Women Voters of California Flickr

Iowa’s Republican Secretary of State Matt Schultz  hopes to match  Iowa voter registration lists  against a federal database to purge non-citizens from the rolls.   Critics  call it  a solution in search of a problem.   

Politics
5:54 am
Fri July 20, 2012

Who are Iowa's Swing Voters, and What are They Saying?

Anna Sale is a politics reporter for WNYC. She's visiting Iowa this week talking to swing-state voters.
WNYC

If you were hoping the political ads would go away after the Iowa caucuses…well, no luck. As you’re probably well aware, Iowa is a swing state in this presidential election.  Both President Obama and his Republican rival Mitt Romney are fighting hard for our six electoral votes in what's looking like a very tight race.

Reporter Anna Sale of WNYC (http://www.wnyc.org/) in New York is also a writer for the political blog, “It’s a Free Country.”  She's been spending the week in Iowa as part of a tour of key swing states.

Read more
Arts & Culture
2:11 pm
Thu July 19, 2012

RAGBRAI Director TJ Juskiewicz on Ride's 40th Year

Dave Herholz / flickr

RAGBRAI XL, the Register’s Annual Great Bike Ride Across Iowa, rolls out of Sioux Center on Sunday. On the latest "Talk of Iowa", host Charity Nebbe spoke with the director of RAGBRAI, TJ Juskiewicz. Juskiewicz shared what is new for this year's route, why the tradition has continued over the years, and how the weather might affect the ride.

River to River
1:45 pm
Thu July 19, 2012

Summer Drought

Clint Alley / flickr

Most of Iowa is now experiencing moderate to severe drought conditions… along with more than half the country.  On today's "River to River' we hear from farmers, business owners and cities about how they’re being affected.  We talk with Elwynn Taylor about the prospects for turning the dry weather around.  And Harry Hillaker tells us how this drought compares with others in the state’s history. 

Business/Economy
5:54 pm
Wed July 18, 2012

Drought sinks teeth into Iowa cities

A sign warning of a blue-green algae bloom is posted on Sandpiper beach on Saylorville Lake. The Des Moines Water Works could tap this lake for its water supply if water levels along the Des Moines and Raccoon rivers continue to decrease.
Clay Masters IPR

With drought conditions now gripping more than half the country, many farmers in Iowa are waiting to see if they’ll even have much of a crop to harvest. While farm country feels the brunt of the drought, those in the city are also being hit. Iowa Public Radio’s Clay Masters reports.

Talk of Iowa
4:08 pm
Wed July 18, 2012

RAGBRAI's 40th Year

Eva Ekeblad / flickr

RAGBRAI XL, the Register’s Annual Great Bike Ride Across Iowa, rolls out of Sioux Center on Sunday.  On today's program, we talk about why this event has endured for forty years, why people from all over the world flock here to bike across Iowa in July, and we reminisce about RAGBRAI's past with Chuck Offenburger.

River to River
11:35 am
Wed July 18, 2012

Politics Day

Recent political ads from both presidential parties have caused hand-wringing on both sides of the isle. This Politics Day we talk with political experts Chris Larimer, associate professor of political science at the University of Northern Iowa, and Dennis Goldford, professor of politics at Drake University, about the latest developments on the political stage.

Talk of Iowa
11:26 am
Wed July 18, 2012

Town Slogans

Richc80/Wikimedia Commons

There’s only one chance for a first impression and many Iowa small towns have developed their own slogan to set them apart from the rest. Charity talks with Kyle Munson, a columnist with the Des Moines Register, and his recent search for the most favored town slogan in the state along with former “Iowa Boy” columnist, Chuck Offenburger. Jeremy Minnier, 18-year-old mayor of Aredale shares the story behind his town’s slogan.

Mike Draper, owner of the Raygun clothing store, also joins the conversation offering unofficial slogans his company has made into t-shirts.

Agriculture/Harvest Public Media
6:22 am
Wed July 18, 2012

Drought hurts grain farmers, but hits livestock producers hardest

Tom Woodward Flickr

It’s official: Iowa is deep in the throes of a drought. State climatologist Harry Hillaker is calling it the worst drought since 1988. Yesterday Hillaker joined Governor Branstad at a town hall in Mount Pleasant. Farmers from across the state came to share concerns—but the most worried? It wasn’t those with thirsty grain crops;  it was livestock farmers. 

River to River
11:59 am
Tue July 17, 2012

Summer Series: Manufacturing Communities

Cedar Rapids 2012
Christopher Dilts [Barack Obama / flickr]

Iowa ranks in the top 10 states most dependent on manufacturing, and the more than six-thousand manufacturing firms located in the state represent almost 11-percent of all employment.  We continue our summer series on Iowa towns with a look at how manufacturing has shaped the history, economy and education of Iowa communities.

Talk of Iowa
11:21 am
Tue July 17, 2012

Summer Series: Disaster Recovery

Parkersburg, IA 2008
1st Sgt. Duff McFadden, Iowa National Guard / flickr

A tornado devastated Parkersburg in 2008, fire gutted Grinnell in 1889, and in the 1980s Bell Plaine was laid low by the farm crisis. When disaster strikes, the repercussions can be felt for decades to come. We continue our series on Iowa towns, with communities that have been shaped by disaster.

River to River
1:24 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Solar Energy

A new state tax credit is encouraging homeowners to invest in solar energy and people throughout Iowa are already using the renewable resource.  Ben Kieffer talks with homeowner, Steve Peterson, who has a solar system in his home, along with Dennis Pottratz, whose renewable energy company installed Steve’s solar system. Energy Program Director for the Iowa Environmental Council, Nathaniel Baer, discusses the tax breaks.

Talk of Iowa
9:47 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Iowa's Opera Houses

The Warren Opera House in Greenfield, IA. (Photo taken by the Warren Cultural Center)

Though opera houses once meant a town held status, many have since fallen into disrepair. Today efforts are underway to renovate and shed light on Iowa’s opera houses, including Sam Knutson's project, the Iowa Opera House Project, which brings Iowa performers into these antique spaces for locals to experience.

Later, Richard Poole and George Glenn, co-authors of The Opera Houses of Iowa, share the history of the state’s opera houses.

Agriculture/Harvest Public Media
7:43 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Bridging the Gap Between Rural, Urban Ag

Urban-Ag Academy Facebook

In the Iowa Statehouse, and in statehouses across the nation, representatives are finding themselves separated—not by party lines, but by whether they come from an urban or rural district.  This weekend, the first Urban Ag Academy was held in Des Moines. The goal? To look at that divide and to give a voice to minority farmers. More than sixty state representatives from across the country came together to in an effort to help bridge the divide between city and country. 

Talk of Iowa
11:16 am
Fri July 13, 2012

Horticulture Day: ISU Field Days

Cindy Haynes, an associate professor of horticulture at Iowa State University, shares information about several upcoming Demonstration Garden Field Days, where the public can catch a glimpse of ongoing research and learn about gardening techniques. Charity also talks with Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture specialist, to tackle listener's gardening questions.

River to River
9:31 am
Fri July 13, 2012

Sustainable Businesses

In 1974, Elliot Hoffman founded the successful business Just Desserts in San Francisco. Now he’s working to spread a message of sustainability across the country.

Listen back to a conversation from April of last year between host Ben Kieffer and Elliot Hoffman. Hoffman’s new venture is called New Voice of Business. He visited Iowa last year – talking about how businesses can benefit the bottom line by adopting sustainable practices.

Iowa business owners and managers also talk about their struggles and successes with sustainability.

River to River
12:18 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Mistaken Eyewitness Identification

Kevin Dooley / flickr

Of the 273 exonerations granted to convicted criminals since 1989, more than 75-percent can be attributed to mistaken eyewitness identification. That's according to the Innocence Project. Today on "River to River", we talk with ISU Psychology professor Gary Wells, who says he's developed a procedure to substantially reduce mistaken identifications in photo lineups.

Talk of Iowa
11:39 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Hodgkin's Lymphoma documentary and the novel "On the Island"

Screenshot from "My Friend Learns If He Still Has Cancer" Nathan Matta / YouTube

When Jake Bouma of Des Moines was diagnosed with Hodgkin's Lymphoma earlier this year, he and his wife decided to document his cancer journey on video. Host Charity Nebbe speaks with Jake and his wife, Libby, about their documentary.

Crime, Justice and Public Safety
5:55 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Iowa Officials Cracking Down on Con Man Posing as ... Them

Iowa’s Democratic Attorney General and Republican Secretary of State have joined forces to stop an unusual kind of identity fraud.   A California con man tried  to collect fees from Iowa corporations by pretending to be the Secretary of State.        

Business/Economy
7:03 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Financial Fallout

Courtesy

Economic development officials have begun to assess the fallout from the abrupt closure of the Cedar Falls-based international brokerage firm, Peregrine Financial Group doing business as PFGBest.  The company is being investigated by both governmental and regulatory officials for fraud and misuse of customer money.  220 million dollars is reportedly missing, Company founder, 64 year old Russell Wasendorf Sr. attempted suicide on Monday. CEO of the Greater Cedar Valley Alliance and Chamber, Steve Dust says they're reacting to what they know and discounting what they can't verify.

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