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Agriculture and Harvest Public Media
5:00 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Mutton busting a rodeo tradition for rough and tumble kids

Navaeha Salgado, 6, peers through a fence at the Greeley Stampede to scope out the sheep she'll soon be latching onto and riding around the arena.
Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

A furry beast, a brave rider and a roaring crowd make up the list of ingredients for the Western rodeo tradition known as “mutton busting.” Think of it as bull-riding, but for 6-year-olds, and the furry beast is actually a wooly sheep.

Mutton busting has its roots in Colorado, where it was first introduced in the 1980s at the National Western Stock Show in Denver. The crowd-pleaser is now a favorite at many rodeos and county fairs across the Midwest and Great Plains.

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River to River
5:08 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Decades of Advocacy for Women: Leaders at RVAP and Planned Parenthood Retire

Karla Miller of RVAP (left) and Jill June of Planned Parenthood of the Heartland (right)

Great strides have been made in understanding and combating domestic and sexual violence, but much more needs to be done. In the first half of River to River, Ben Kieffer talks with Karla Miller, who just retired after 22 years as director of the Rape Victim Advocacy Program in Iowa City.

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Studio One
2:45 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Your Midwest Summer Music Festival Guide

Credit Des Moines Register

The music festival season is well under way, and as the fourth of July weekend approaches there are several to choose from around the Midwest depending on what kind of music you enjoy, and how far you would like to travel. But even if you already have plans for this weekend there are several upcoming festivals that are taking place on various dates throughout the summer

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Talk of Iowa
12:43 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Gentlemen Bootleggers, the True Story of Templeton Rye

A bar on the eve of prohibition, 1919
Library of Congress

During prohibition, there were people all over the United States making and selling spirits, but the people in Templeton, Iowa who were making fine whiskey were not your run of the mill bootleggers.  Host Charity Nebbe digs in to the remarkable history of Templeton Rye with Bryce Bauer, author of Gentlemen Bootleggers: The True Story of Templeton Rye, Prohibition, and a Small Town in Cahoots and historian Tim Walch.  They talk about why Iowa went dry five years before the rest of the country and how this small town set

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Agriculture and Harvest Public Media
5:00 am
Thu July 3, 2014

My Farm Roots: Smells Like Home

Growing up in Nebraska, Kari Williams spent many vacations visiting her family’s farms.
Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Most family vacations are remembered for endless car rides, packed tourist beaches and a string of poorly decorated hotel rooms.

But not former Nebraskan and current Coloradan Kari Williams. Her family vacation memories center on smells of cow manure, adventures on horseback and roosters with bad attitudes on farms in central Nebraska.

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Politics Day
4:00 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

More Than Red and Blue, Political Typology Shades of Gray

Wikipedia

We often like to think of states in terms of red and blue, and people in terms of Democrats, Republicans and Independents.  But, the Pew Research Center finds our politics offers many more shades of gray.  Host Ben Kieffer talks with a Pew researcher about their latest political typology study and what hints it might provide for the upcoming midterm elections.  Are you a "Young Outsider," or a "Hard Pressed Skeptic?"  You can take the quiz

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Education
9:11 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Treasured Ink: Is Cursive a Thing of the Past?

Wikimedia Commons

Between typing and texting we are a lot less likely to put pen to paper. What's lost when we don't? 

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Agriculture and Harvest Public Media
5:00 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Chef Camp Teaches Basics of Food Production

Farmer Marty Travis shows off one of his fields to the chef campers on June 8, 2014.
Sean Powers for Harvest Public Media

With farm to table restaurants springing up left and right, cooks are having to go beyond the grocery store. That’s why about a dozen chefs from Chicago and central Illinois recently gathered for a two-day crash course on where their food comes from – the farm.

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Agriculture and Harvest Public Media
7:54 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

FFA Chapter "Beefs Up" Its Investments

Lime Springs Beef LLC owner Jesse Stevens
IPR's Pat Blank

  Students at Crestwood High School FFA are making a 20 thousand dollar investment in a soon to be opened beef processing facility near Lime Springs in North Iowa. They're using some of the 90 thousand dollars they had in the bank after selling some land a few years ago. Initially the FFA chapter was unable to take advantage of the opportunity because state law did not allow investment of taxpayer money in a private enterprise.  State lawmakers assisted the group in introducing the Entrepreneurial Funds for Student Organizations and Clubs Act.

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River to River
5:52 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

The Washington Redskins: “I think it’s very derogatory; native people are not red”

Keith Allison

The U.S. Patent Office says the Washington Redskins' federal trademarks must be canceled. Today on River to River we ask - what’s in a name?

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River to River
5:52 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Iowans Weigh in on Supreme Court Hobby Lobby Decision

Nicholas Eckhart

Monday's U.S. Supreme Court decision in favor of Hobby Lobby can be seen as "narrow" or "broad" - depending on how it's looked at. Today on River to River, we ask a political scientist and a legal expert what implications this ruling has for the future.

Today's guests include: Scott Peters, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Northern Iowa, and Mark Kende, Professor of Law at Drake and the Director of the Drake Constitutional Law Center.

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Wildlife Day
2:31 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Great Waterbirds of Iowa

Green Heron
Jim Pease

With their long elegant necks, spindly legs and otherworldly calls, an encounter with one of Iowa's herons can take your breath away.  Host Charity Nebbe talks with Wildlife Biologist Jim Pease about his summer spent paddling many of Iowa's waterways.  On those trips he has gotten up close with Great Blue Herons, Green Herons and Egrets, some of Iowa's most impressive waterbirds.  We learn about their mating, nesting and feeding habits.

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Science and Technology
11:51 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Testing New Weather Radar Over the Rocky Mountains

Rockwell Collins Senior Systems Engineer, Gregory Koenigs, explains the advanced radar displays aboard the company’s experimental aircraft which is analyzing storm clouds in the flight path.
Photo by Dean Borg

Rockwell Collins is building advanced weather radar technology that analyzes storm clouds to provide aircraft pilots with predictions for hail, wind shear, and lightning threats in the plane’s flight path.  The new radar, called “Threat Track Weather Radar” is built in the company’s Cedar Rapids and Decorah plants. Dean Borg travels hundreds of miles with engineers to see a demonstrate of this new technology in an experimental aircraft flying over the Rocky Mountains.

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Health
4:28 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Migraine Science Making Strides

Sasha Wolff Wikimedia Commons

36 million Americans suffer from migraine headaches, but understanding why exactly these types of headaches happen has been elusive. Until recently, scientists thought migraines were a vascular issue, caused by irregular blood flow to the brain, but Dr. Lynn Rankin of Unity Point Health in Des Moines says we’ve come to a new understanding in the last few years. Migraines are most likely a brain disorder that has to do with pain circuitry. 

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Talk of Iowa
2:18 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Prairie Silence

When Melanie Hoffert returned home to help with harvest, she decided to try driving a grain truck.
Melanie Hoffert melaniehoffert.com

Melanie Hoffert grew up on a farm in North Dakota.  Like so many others, she left.  But now she feels torn between the land and people she loves and the freedom to live an authentic life.  Host Charity Nebbe talks with Hoffert about her memoir Prairie Silence: A Rural Ex-Patriot's Journey to Reconcile, Home, Love and Faith.  In that book, she describes the month she returned to her family farm to help her father and brother during harvest.  They also discuss what it was like to grow up as a gay woman in rural North Dakota.

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News
8:32 am
Mon June 30, 2014

Immigrant Children Learn Through Art

Art Force Iowa Director John Mark Feilmeyer works with his group of immigrant and refugee children on their mini-documentary
Credit Amanda Horvath

There are at least 15 thousand immigrant children living in Iowa, some of them are refugees. As that number continues to grow one Des Moines organization is trying a different approach to help them adapt to their new lives.

  On the north side of Des Moines a dozen immigrant and refugee children produced a mini documentary.

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News Buzz
4:44 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Lightning Follows the Path of Least Resistance (Don't let that be you!)

The last Iowa death caused by lightning was in 2008
William Ingram

True or False - If taller things are around you, you're safe from getting hit by lightning.

True or False - You should determine whether it is safe to be outside based on the amount of seconds between lightning and thunder.

True or False - You can develop tree looking "tattoos" if you survive a lightning strike.

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News Buzz
4:26 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Taking Flight This Weekend: Iowa's Air Shows

A fan plays with his Thunderbird F-16 souvenir during the Quad City Air show at the Davenport Municipal Airport in Iowa
U.S. Air Force photo/ Tech. Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez

Fly Iowa "takes flight" in Iowa City this weekend, for the first time since 2001, showcasing the role of aviation in Iowa.

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News Buzz
4:02 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Former State Official Says Branstad Aides Involved in Secret Settlements

John Pemble IPR

Des Moines Register political columnist, Kathie Obradovich, joins River to River to discuss the ongoing investigation into settlement agreements given to former state employees for their silence upon termination.

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Health
2:27 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Chiropractic School Must Accommodate Blind Students

Lumbar spine with right (R) x-ray marker.
Michael Dorausch

The Iowa Supreme Court ruled Davenport’s Palmer College of Chiropractic discriminated against a blind student when the school did not provide accommodations for his disability.

A few years before Aaron Cannon entered Palmer’s graduate program, the school started requiring students to read and interpret X-rays, to meet industry standards.

Cannon told the school he could complete the course work with the assistance of a sighted aid. Palmer said this wouldn’t suffice since the aid would be interpreting X-rays by describing photos to Cannon. 

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Horticulture Day
12:08 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Dandelion Donuts and Mulberry Taffy

Eat your dandelions
Leo Seta under Creative Commons Attribution License 2.0 Flickr

Everyone knows that morel mushrooms are delicious, but our forests and fields hold a lot of other wild delicacies too.

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Arts and Culture
1:07 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Dead Man Walking: Intimate View of Death Row through Opera

Sister Helen Prejean speaks during a lecture at Drake University, May 2014. Her work with death row inmates is the basis for the opera “Dead Man Walking”, which is being presented by the Des Moines Metro Opera's summer 2014 season.
Photo by John Pemble

The Des Moines Metro Opera's summer 2014 season includes “Dead Man Walking”, the company’s first work from the 21st century.  It’s an adaptation of Sister Helen Prejean’s 1994 book about her experiences of ministering to death row inmates.  The story is based on Prejean’s early prison ministry work when she became the spiritual advisor for death row inmate, Patrick Sonnier until his execution in 1984 at the Louisiana State Penitentiary.  While the opera is based on Sonnier’s case, the story uses a fictious character, Joseph De Rocher.

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Talk of Iowa
5:51 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Surrogacy: Stories of Love, Pain, and Giving

Talk of Iowa host Charity Nebbe (left), surrogate mother Kate Duffus (middle), and psychologist Stacey Pawlak (right)
Emily Woodbury

Kate Duffus is pregnant for the fourth time, but the little girl she is carrying will not be her little girl.

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Politics
4:44 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Sister Activism: An Opera and Reflections from a Nun on a Bus

Sister Simone Campbell
Wikimedia Commons

When Sister Simone Campbell first heard about Congressman Paul Ryan’s budget deal, she was less than impressed. “America was not founded on individualism, you can’t have a quilting bee alone. We need to encourage solidarity. He made it seem like it’s the responsibility of the poor to pull themselves up by the bootstrap, that’s not right.”

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News
6:30 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Siouxland Recovers from Floods

Dawn De Wit, of Rock Valley, stands beside a flooded farm field on the outskirts of this town of more than 3,000 residents in northwest Iowa.
Credit Clay Masters / IPR

  Torrential downpours in northwest Iowa caused rivers to swell… floodwaters damaged homes, businesses and farmland.  Federal Emergency Management Agency officials are assessing the area to see if it qualifies for federal help. State officials on Monday said public infrastructure sustained more than $15 million worth of damage in the state.

That doesn’t include homes, businesses and farmland in Rock Valley and other parts of the region that were destroyed.

“We’ve had a few (floods), but nothing remotely close to this,” said Rock Valley Mayor Kevin Van Otterloo.

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Bakken Crude
10:49 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Bakken Crude Routes Revealed

Photo by Cha gia Jose

The United States Department of Transportation  has ordered the nation’s rail lines to let states know how much crude oil is coming through from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota.  The  Bakken crude is especially  flammable and a number of derailments have resulted in disastrous fires.   Iowa officials are  in dispute with the rail lines about whether to release  the information to the general  public.  

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Politics Day
4:24 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

November Matchups Set

David Young, the Republican nominee for Congress from Iowa's third district
Young for Iowa

The last round of primary elections until August was held on Tuesday.  Most of the matchups for the November midterm elections are set, including Iowa's contests.  In a surprise victory this weekend, delegates to the third district Republican convention, chose David Young, former Chief of Staff for Senator Charles Grassley, as their nominee.  That despite his fifth place finish in June 3rd voting.  Host Ben Kieffer talks with Tim Hagle, Associate Professor of Political Science at University of Iowa and Chris Larimer, Associate Professor of Political Science at University of Northern Iowa ab

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Music
3:20 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Women in Song: From Codependence to Independence

from "Respect: A Musical Journey of Women" in Chicago
Courtesy of Dorothy Marcic

When Professor Dorothy Marcic was asked to give a talk about how women have been portrayed in song lyrics over the course of the 21st century, she was shocked to find that nobody had really look into it, so she did.

“What I found was that the songs that resonated on Top 40 charts, have shadowed the women’s empowerment movement. Songs start out being very co-dependent, like in Little Peggy March’s ‘I Will Follow Him’ and end up being very empowering. Take ‘I Will Survive’ by Gloria  Gaynor," she explains.

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News
4:59 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Data Centers in Iowa: Are the Incentives Worth It?

17-year-old Jacob Higgins explains the small-scale data center his class built with a grant from Google.
Durrie Bouscaren Iowa Public Radio

Google, Facebook and Microsoft have all made large investments to build large data center facilities in the state of Iowa. All three have also received multi-million dollar tax exemptions, rebates, and grants to entice them to come. In Part One of Iowa Public Radio’s data center series, we talked about why our state appeals to these Silicon Valley titans. Today, reporter Durrie Bouscaren visits Council Bluffs to ask, what’s in it for our state? 

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River to River
4:34 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Vegetables or Candy?

Martin Cathrae/Creative Commons

When you ask people what is important to eat, they'll tell you vegetables.  When you quietly watch, they'll mostly eat candy.  It turns out the same is true of news.  The launching board for our conversation is a new study showing that while people consistently rank news coverage of international news, business and politics as being most important to their lives, an analysis of their online behavior tells a different story.  The study sparked this recent article in

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