medicine http://iowapublicradio.org en News Buzz: Preventing Preeclampsia http://iowapublicradio.org/post/news-buzz-preventing-preeclampsia <p>Preeclampsia, a cardiovascular condition that affects expecting mothers and often causes premature births, kills 100,000 women worldwide every year. Previously, it’s been difficult to predict or prevent before the late stages of a pregnancy. But a few researchers at the University of Iowa may change that. Fri, 11 Jul 2014 21:27:07 +0000 Ben Kieffer & Emily Woodbury 43615 at http://iowapublicradio.org News Buzz: Preventing Preeclampsia Behind the Numbers on Your Hospital Bill http://iowapublicradio.org/post/behind-numbers-your-hospital-bill <p>In the emergency room, the last thing you want to think about is what your bill is going to look like. But, weeks later you will receive a bill in the mail; and you might experience some sticker shock.</p><p>Today on <em>River to River</em>, we seek to answer your hospital billing questions. Questions like: why does an aspirin cost upwards of $15, when I can get a generic bottle at the drug store at 2 cents a pop?</p> Fri, 28 Mar 2014 01:07:27 +0000 Emily Woodbury 38233 at http://iowapublicradio.org Behind the Numbers on Your Hospital Bill The Murky World of Emergency Room Billing http://iowapublicradio.org/post/murky-world-emergency-room-billing <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">No matter how you slice it, medical care is expensive—especially in an emergency.</span></p><p>Martha Norbeck shuffles through paperwork as she looks back over her itemized hospital bill from a bike accident five months ago.</p><p>“Just to have the guy come to the ER to do my stitches was $460, the six stitches was $846… so that was $140 a stitch or something?” Norbeck&nbsp;muses.&nbsp;</p> Thu, 27 Mar 2014 10:21:00 +0000 Durrie Bouscaren 38185 at http://iowapublicradio.org The Murky World of Emergency Room Billing Noonan: The Most Common Medical Syndrome You've Never Heard Of http://iowapublicradio.org/post/noonan-most-common-medical-syndrome-youve-never-heard <p>Noonan syndrome is a&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">genetic condition. &nbsp;The characteristic facial features include&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">low set ears, widely spaced-eyes, bright blue or blue-green eyes, a low hairline at the back of the head, and multiple congenital problems like heart defects and an unusually shaped chest. </span></p> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 18:18:51 +0000 Charity Nebbe & Ben Stanton 36870 at http://iowapublicradio.org Noonan: The Most Common Medical Syndrome You've Never Heard Of Blood and Bone Marrow Donation http://iowapublicradio.org/post/blood-and-bone-marrow-donation <p>How likely are you to donate blood? Are you more motivated if you were given something in exchange for donating? A t-shirt? Maybe an umbrella?&nbsp; How about a 15-dollar gift card?&nbsp; On this River to River, Ben Kieffer&nbsp;talks a little about how our behavior is affected by the financial incentive to donate. But also the larger picture of how blood is processed, and how blood centers work to reduce the risks for recipients. &nbsp;</p><p></p><p></p> Tue, 26 Nov 2013 20:08:28 +0000 Ben Kieffer & Ben Stanton 32690 at http://iowapublicradio.org Blood and Bone Marrow Donation Iowa Medicine http://iowapublicradio.org/post/iowa-medicine <div>Nearly 200-thousand babies each year are born with congenital clubfoot. On this River to River<span style="line-height: 1.5;">, Iowa Week continues with a look at pioneering work in medicine. &nbsp;Hear</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;about the Iowa-based </span>Ponseti<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> International Association which treats clubfoot. &nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Dr. Wed, 25 Sep 2013 13:27:04 +0000 Ben Kieffer & Ben Stanton 29617 at http://iowapublicradio.org Iowa Medicine How Doctors Can Help Patients Lose Weight http://iowapublicradio.org/post/how-doctors-can-help-patients-lose-weight <p>Today we listen back to a show from September 2012 on how physicians can help their patients lose weight.</p><p>Have you ever been to the doctor and was told, "You really need to lose some weight."&nbsp; While many of us&nbsp; need to slim down, dropping the pounds is easier said than done.&nbsp; Host Charity Nebbe speaks with Dr. Lawrence Apple who&nbsp; studies the best and most efficient ways for physicians to help their patients lose weight.</p><p></p> Wed, 31 Jul 2013 18:13:59 +0000 Charity Nebbe 26700 at http://iowapublicradio.org How Doctors Can Help Patients Lose Weight Iowa Surgeon Helping Refugees in South Sudan http://iowapublicradio.org/post/iowa-surgeon-helping-refugees-south-sudan <p>An Iowa doctor is preparing to come home after spending the past couple of weeks doing relief work in a part of the world facing one of the worst refugee crises in memory.</p><p>Dr. Alan Koslow is a vascular surgeon from Des Moines. He landed in South Sudan about two weeks ago, in an area where tens of thousands of refugees have been fleeing violence and famine across the border in Sudan.</p><p>Koslow spoke with IPR&#39;s Sarah McCammon through an internet phone from the South Sudanese capital of Juba.</p> Fri, 13 Jul 2012 11:48:08 +0000 Sarah McCammon 4627 at http://iowapublicradio.org Iowa Surgeon Helping Refugees in South Sudan Civil War Medicine http://iowapublicradio.org/post/civil-war-medicine <p>More than six hundred thousand men died during the Civil War and&nbsp;twice as many men died of disease than of gunshot wounds. Charity talks with Dr. Kendall Reed from Des Moines University medical practices during the war and how the period led to numerous medical advancements.&nbsp; Later, Lester Menke,&nbsp;&nbsp;author of &nbsp;&ldquo;When Apples Had No Worms&rdquo;, shares his stories from&nbsp;growing up in the 1920s and 30s.</p> Mon, 09 Jul 2012 18:07:41 +0000 Charity Nebbe 4403 at http://iowapublicradio.org Civil War Medicine Encore Edition: Personalized Medicine http://iowapublicradio.org/post/encore-edition-personalized-medicine <p>It started as blood-typing and has advanced to designing cancer treatments specific to the cellular makeup of a tumor. And in the not-so-distant future, it will mean looking at a patient&#39;s DNA to determine the best course of treatment for a variety of diseases. In a program that originally aired last November, Ben talks with guests about the technology that allows doctors to use the right medicines for the right patients at the right time, and the ethical and cost considerations of unlocking the secrets that lie on our DNA.</p> Fri, 09 Mar 2012 05:00:00 +0000 Ben Kieffer 204 at http://iowapublicradio.org