Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Freedonia won't be sending a representative, but delegates from Molossia, Slabovia and Broslavia will all attend the MicroCon 2015 summit in Anaheim, Calif., on Saturday.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will officially announce her intention to seek the 2016 Democratic nomination for president on Sunday afternoon, ending years of speculation over her plans to pursue the Oval Office, NPR has learned.

Pakistan's parliament has rejected a proposal to join a Saudi-led coalition battling Yemen's Houthi rebels, a move that could dash Riyadh's hopes of forming a wider Sunni front against the Iranian-allied rebels on its southern flank.

Pakistani lawmakers instead approved a draft resolution calling on all sides in the Arabian Peninsula conflict to peacefully resolve their differences peacefully. Riyadh had asked for troops, planes and possibly naval support.

Pacific Gas & Electric Co.has been ordered to pay a $1.6 billion penalty — the largest ever levied against a public utility — for a 2010 explosion in a gas pipeline it operated that killed eight people and destroyed dozens of homes in a San Francisco suburb.

The five-member California Public Utilities Commission voted 4-0 Thursday to impose the penalty. President Michael Picker called for a larger review of problems at PG&E, a move that The Associated Press says "suggests the energy behemoth could be broken up."

There's something amiss on Mischief Reef: Before and after satellite imagery of the disputed coral atoll in the South China Sea taken a few years ago and last month show that the reef is growing. And the telltale presence of a Chinese flotilla is proof of who's been at work dredging up white sand and depositing it on the surface.

Meiji Reef, as the Chinese call it, is part of the Spratly Islands, an archipelago that has long been the source of a tug-of-war between China, Vietnam, the Philippines and at least three other claimants.

A Chinese television star made a public apology after controversial remarks he made that were critical of communist revolutionary leader Mao Zedong.

Bi Fujian, a regular presenter on state-run CCTV and the host of its annual New Year's variety show — the most-watched television program in the world, according to the BBC — says he's sorry for his actions.

In one of India's largest-ever cases of corporate fraud, the founder and chairman of failed outsourcing giant Satyam Computer Services and nine other defendants have been sentenced to seven years in prison on charges of stealing millions from shareholders.

An Indian court in the country's tech hub, Hyderabad, ruled Thursday that B. Ramalinga Raju, his two brothers and seven other officials of Satyam — which collapsed in 2009 — used forged documents and fake bank accounts in a scheme that cost the company's shareholders $2.28 billion.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu urged the U.S. to seek a better agreement with Iran over its nuclear weapons program, insisting that he's not trying to kill any deal, just "a bad deal."

Netanyahu, speaking on NBC's Meet the Press, argued that the current plan "leaves the preeminent terrorist state of our time with a vast nuclear infrastructure."

He lamented that "not one centrifuge is destroyed" under the agreement.

Pope Francis, in his annual Urbi et Orbi ("To the City [Rome] and to the World") Easter address at St. Peter's Basilica, praised the framework agreement on Iran's nuclear program and expressed concern about bloodshed in Africa and the Middle East.

Many Kenyans are spending Easter Sunday mourning the 148 people killed in an attack by al-Shabab gunmen on a university campus last week, amid reports that the son of a senior government official was among the assailants.

The gunman in question – one of four killed during the siege at Garissa College – was Abdirahim Mohammed Abdullahi, the son of the local chief in Mandera County, The Associated Press and the BBC report.

Updated at 5:35 p.m. EDT

Islamic State militants and al-Qaida's Syrian affiliate appear to have worked together earlier this week to seize a Palestinian refugee camp on the outskirts of the Syrian capital.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reports that ISIS and al-Nusra Front gained control of about 90 percent of the Yarmouk refugee camp after an assault on Wednesday. A Palestinian official says today that civilians were fleeing the camp amid clashes between the extremist groups and Palestinian armed factions.

A man in San Diego who ran a so-called "revenge porn" site that charged hundreds of dollars to remove anonymously posted nude photos has been sentenced to 18 years in prison after his conviction on 21 counts of identity theft and six counts of extortion.

Kevin Bollaert, 28, ran the sites UGotPosted.com and ChangeMyReputation.com.

A coalition of tribal fighters riding in pickup trucks have entered Yemen's coastal city of Mukalla in an effort to displace al-Qaida militiamen who seized the Gulf of Aden town just two days before.

Reuters reports:

"The fighters are part of a tribal alliance in the eastern Hadramawt province which has pledged to restore security after the militants seized Mukalla on Thursday and ransacked buildings, broke into banks and freed prisoners.

Rescuers in north and central Kentucky were trying to reach people trapped by a sudden flash flood that followed torrential downpours on Thursday and Friday.

In Lee County, about 50 miles southeast of Lexington, authorities were searching for a mother and daughter swept away as rescue workers were trying to reach them, The Associated Press reports. It was one of about 160 rescues prompted by the heavy rainfall, the AP says.

Kenyan officials say that five suspects have been arrested in connection with this week's attack by al-Shabab militants on a university in the country's east, killing 148 people, as the Islamist extremist group warned that more bloodshed is forthcoming.

Kenya's internal security minister says some of the suspects were captured while trying to flee to neighboring Somalia, where the al-Shabab movement is based.

Early risers (very early on the U.S. West Coast) who had clear skies might have caught a view of today's lunar eclipse — the third in a cycle of four that had its premiere nearly a year ago.

Those of us on the East Coast (this writer included) got to see a partial eclipse before the moon set in the west.

North Americans could get a glimpse of the Earth shadowing the moon (very) early Saturday — the third in a series of four lunar eclipses that began nearly a year ago. But only those on the West Coast, in the Pacific or Asia will have a chance at seeing the full show.

Many politicians and businesses have expressed satisfaction with changes made to the language of "religious freedom" measures in Indiana and Arkansas aimed at preventing them from being used to discriminate against gays and lesbians.

Others see the compromise language as a watering down or worse — a sellout. And a few said the changes didn't go far enough.

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

The U.S. economy gained just 126,000 jobs in March, a figure well short of economists' expectations and the weakest growth since December 2013, the Labor Department reports. The unemployment rate held steady at 5.5 percent.

The consensus among economic forecasters had been for 245,000 new jobs, which would have continued a 200,000+ monthly streak that has been the longest such spurt of job growth since the early 1990s. Over the last year alone, the U.S. economy has added 3 million jobs.

Updated at 9:35 a.m. ET

In late January, Louis Jordan sailed away from the South Carolina coast aboard his 35-foot sailboat. More than two months later, almost given up for dead, he was rescued 200 miles off Cape Hatteras.

In 66 days at sea, Jordan survived by catching fish and drinking rainwater, he told his rescuers after being spotted by and taken aboard the German-flagged container ship Houston Express.

One of Alabama's longest-serving death row inmates will go free on Friday after prosecutors acknowledged that there's not enough evidence linking him to the 1985 murders for which he already has served nearly three decades.

China is strongly protesting the apparent emergency landing of two U.S. Navy F-18 fighters at an airbase in Taiwan — the first time such an incident has occurred in three decades.

Beijing has long considered Taiwan part of its territory and the presence of U.S. warplanes there has caused unease.

"We have already made solemn representations to the U.S. side," China's Foreign Ministry spokeswoman, Hua Chunying, told a regular news briefing.

"We require the U.S. to abide by the 'One-China Policy' ... to prudently deal with the relevant issue," Hua added.

Christian televangelist Robert Schuller, best known for the Sunday morning Hour of Power telecast he hosted for decades from his Crystal Cathedral megachurch in California, has died at 88.

Schuller's daughter, Carol Schuller Milner, and grandson, Rev. Bobby Schuller, announced the news on Twitter. Bobby Schuller, who has taken over as host of a scaled-back Hour of Power, said today that his grandfather "passed this morning into eternal life with Christ."

Updated at 6:21 p.m. ET

Lawmakers in Indiana and Arkansas have approved changes to their respective "religious freedom" measures designed to answer critics who charged the laws were meant to discriminate against gays and lesbians by allowing businesses to refuse them service.

The amendments were passed by Legislatures in Indianapolis and Little Rock after a day of wrestling over the details of amendments to the measures.

A Russian fishing trawler plying the frigid northern waters off the far eastern Kamchatka Peninsula suddenly capsized and sank, reportedly while recovering its nets, killing at least 56 among a crew of 132.

At least 63 people have been rescued after the Dalniy Vostok went down in the Sea of Okhotsk, leaving 13 still missing in the bitterly cold water.

As NPR's Corey Flintoff reports, some of the rescued crew members said the vessel was hoisting aboard a net full of fish when it capsized and sank in just 15 minutes.

Update at 10:50 p.m.:

NPR's Peter Kenyon, covering the talks in Lausanne, Switzerland, reports:

"A major compromise that could be part of a deal wold involve Iran agreeing to ship much of its stockpile of nuclear fuel out of the country, presumably to Russia. But Sunday evening, Iranian media quote Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araqchi as saying, 'Sending uranium stockpile out of the country is not [on] the agenda.'"

The Arab League has agreed in principle to establish its own military force designed to combat the threat from Islamist extremists in the region, as the 22-member grouping said that Saudi-led airstrikes against Yemeni Shiite insurgents would continue until the rebels "withdraw and surrender their weapons."

Islamist insurgents in Nigeria have reportedly killed about 40 people, including a lawmaker, as the polling for a new president continues in the West African country.

Voting was extended for a second day after technical problems kept some from casting their ballots on Saturday. Incumbent President Goodluck Jonathan is squaring off against former military dictator Muhammadu Buhari.

Pope Francis, addressing tens of thousands at St. Peter's Square for his Palm Sunday Mass, remembered the dead of the Germanwings crash and paid tribute to "martyrs" killed for defending their faith.

Speaking in Italian, Francis, 78, prayed for those killed last week in the crash of the airliner in the French Alps, noting that schoolchildren were aboard the plane, which is believed to have been deliberately crashed by the co-pilot.

Updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence — facing a major backlash from a new law that would allow businesses in the state to cite religious objections to refuse to serve gay people — says he supports an effort to "clarify the intent" of the legislation while acknowledging surprise over the hostility it has sparked.

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