Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Updated at 3:25 p.m. ET

NATO in Afghanistan says it will lead an investigation into an airstrike in Kunduz this weekend that hit a Médecins Sans Frontières hospital, killing 22 people — an attack that the humanitarian organization, also known as Doctors Without Borders, has called "a war crime."

A U.S.-led airstrike on the northern Afghan city was carried out Saturday, but the circumstances surrounding it remain murky. NATO acknowledges only that the raid occurred near the charity's hospital.

Utah GOP Rep. Jason Chaffetz says he wants to challenge Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy for the post of House speaker, saying he's a better communicator and has more credibility with the party's conservative base.

"I am running for Speaker of the House of Representatives because I want to lead the way on tackling the toughest issues facing the United States of America," Chaffetz said in a statement released today.

Updated at 12:55 p.m. ET

The Coast Guard says it has located several objects floating in the water near the spot in the Bahamas where a 790-foot cargo ship and its crew of 33 went missing last week after issuing a distress satellite notification amid hurricane-force winds and waves.

U.S. Coast Guard pilots searching for a third day for the El Faro — a roll-on, roll-off container ship — found life jackets, containers and an oil slick on the water.

Updated at 1:10 a.m. ET Monday:

A powerful rainstorm continues to soak South Carolina. At least five deaths have been reported across the state. Several sections of interstate highways have been closed including a 70-mile portion of I-95. In the state's capital Columbia, rescue operations will continue through at least Monday. Many schools and universities have canceled Monday classes and some businesses will also be closed. Forecasters predict it could be Tuesday before the rain stops.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The sheriff in Roseburg, Oregon, where a gunman killed 9 students at Umpqua Community College earlier this week, said that the shooter killed himself during a confrontation with police at the scene of the campus assault.

Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin, speaking at what he said would be the final scheduled new conference on the Thursday shooting, said that the Oregon medical examiner has identified the cause of death of the shooter as suicide.

Monsignor Krzysztof Charamsa, a 43-year-old Polish priest who revealed his homosexuality, and a same-sex relationship on the eve of gathering of bishops from around the world, has been stripped of his doctrinal responsibilities for what the Vatican says are "very serious and irresponsible" actions.

"The decision to make such a pointed statement on the eve of the opening of the synod appears very serious and irresponsible, since it aims to subject the synod assembly to undue media pressure," the Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, said in a statement.

Authorities are trying to build a profile of the 26-year-old gunman who shot and killed 9 people and wounded as many at a western Oregon community college on Thursday in hopes of discovering what his motive might have been.

The Douglas County Sheriff, John Hanlin, has refused to say the shooter's name, stating that he doesn't want to "glorify" him, but officials have said he is Christopher Sean Harper-Mercer and that he was killed at the scene in a shoot-out with police.

Here's what we know about him:

Updated at 9:03 p.m. ET

Hurricane Joaquin is moving rapidly away from the Bahamas as a Category 4 storm, with sustained winds of 155 mph. Although forecasters say it will stay well offshore from the U.S. East Coast, Bermuda could be in the storm's crosshairs.

Even without a direct hit on the Eastern Seaboard, severe flooding, partly from hurricane-generated rain, was is a big concern in the Carolinas. The White House has declared a state of emergency in South Carolina, which is getting historic levels of rainfall.

Updated at 1:35 p.m. ET

A powerful Hurricane Joaquin was pummeling the Bahamas as it stayed put over the islands with sustained winds of 130 mph.

The storm is expected to begin a gradual march north, but most forecast models now place it firmly on a trajectory that stays well offshore from the U.S. East Coast, alleviating some concern over its potential impact.

The Coast Guard was searching for a 735-foot cargo ship with 33 crew aboard after an emergency satellite message was received from the vessel saying it was caught in the path of Hurricane Joaquin.

It was a routine launch for the Atlas V booster, which was carrying a Mexican satellite into orbit as it lifted off from Florida's Cape Canaveral on Friday morning. But the rocket's expanding exhaust plume was anything but ordinary.

Updated at 10:50 p.m. ET

After a shooting at a community college in western Oregon, 10 people are dead and seven others are wounded, according to the Douglas County sheriff. Officials would not say whether the shooter, who was killed by police in an exchange of gunfire on campus, was included in the 10 fatalities.

In a evening news conference, Sheriff John Hanlin said that investigators believe they know the name of the attacker, and it will be released by the medical examiner.

Today is the day — the beginning of the end for the venerable (but woefully open to abuse) magnetic stripe, a technology pioneered in the 1960s. Enter the more secure age of the chip, or "EMV" cards.

At least in theory.

It's actually a bit more complicated. Here are three things to know:

Is today (Oct. 1) the deadline for the switch from magnetic-stripe cards to the chipped cards?

Updated, 1:20 a.m. ET

The National Hurricane Center's projections for Hurricane Joaquin in the past two days have incrementally moved the storm east. Now the government agency is saying the storm is likely to miss the United States altogether.

Some coastal flooding is still likely from the storm's surge, the hurricane center says, and unrelated rains could cause flooding in parts of the Carolinas and Virginia.

Updated at 8:50 a.m. ET on Sept. 28

Pope Francis has bid the United States farewell. His plane departed for Rome on Sunday night, thus bringing to a close his first visit to U.S. soil.

"My days with you have been brief, but they have been days of great grace for me. And I pray for you, too," the pontiff said, in a brief ceremony at the Philadelphia International Airport before his flight's departure. "As I prepare to leave, I do so with a heart full of gratitude and hope."

President Obama and Cuba's President Raul Castro will meet on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday, a White House official says.

The leaders met face-to-face in April in Panama for the first time. This would be their second such meeting, an official told reporters aboard Air Force One.

The Associated Press reports:

Iraq says it has reached a deal to share intelligence with Russia and Iran as part of an effort to defeat the Islamic State group, which controls large parts of the region.

French warplanes also carried out their first airstrikes against ISIS in Syria, hitting targets identified during reconnaissance missions over the past two weeks, according to the BBC.

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani tells NPR that much like in the United States, there are in his country "two differing viewpoints" on the six-party nuclear deal — one that is cautiously optimistic of success and another that is highly skeptical of Washington's desire to live up to its end of the bargain.

Updated at 8:40 a.m. ET Sept. 28

Pope Francis, in a previously unannounced stop, met with victims of clergy sex abuse in Philadelphia, as the pontiff is wrapping up a six-day visit to the U.S. that will culminate with a huge Mass this afternoon.

Meeting with 300 bishops, Francis said he had met with the sex abuse survivor group Sunday morning.

"It continues to be on my mind that the people who had the responsibility to take care of these tender ones, violated that trust and caused them great pain," he said, adding "God weeps."

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

The death toll in a stampede of hajj pilgrims in Saudi Arabia this week has risen to 769, many of whom are Iranians. Tehran has denounced the tragedy as a "crime."

"The latest statistics up to this hour reveal 769 dead. That is an increase of 52 on the previous figures," Saudi Health Minister Khalid al-Falih told a new conference, according to Arab News.

China's President Xi Jinping has pledged billions in aid to help the world's poorest countries implement sustainable development.

"China will continue to increase investment in the least developed countries, aiming to increase its total to $12 billion by 2030," Xi said in New York during a sustainable development summit of world leaders.

Police in Thailand say they are ready to prosecute two suspects in connection with the August bombing of a prominent religious shrine in central Bangkok that killed 20 people and wounded 120 others.

Authorities say that one of the two suspects is "yellow-shirt man" seen in a closed circuit video leaving a backpack behind moments before the deadly blast. The second man is said to have been an accomplice.

Switzerland has announced that it will temporarily halt the sale of Volkswagen diesel-engine vehicles after it was revealed earlier this month that the automaker cheated on emissions tests.

Thomas Rohrbach, spokesman for the Swiss federal office of roadways, is quoted by The Associated Press as saying that "the ban is on all cars with diesel engines in the 'euro 5' emissions category. It includes all VW models — as well as Seat, Skodas and others in the VW group."

Updated at 9:40 p.m. ET

Pope Francis, in a speech at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, spoke of the need to preserve religious freedom throughout the world and warned against the use of religion "as a pretext for hatred and brutality."

"In this place which is symbolic of the American way, I would like to reflect with you on the right to religious freedom," he said. "It is a fundamental right which shapes the way we interact socially and personally with our neighbors whose religious views differ from our own."

Embattled carmaker Volkswagen has named Matthias Mueller to take the wheel after CEO Martin Winterkorn stepped down earlier this week in the wake of a growing scandal involving some 11 million diesel vehicles equipped with software that cheated emissions testing.

Maybe you've become inured to all the superlatives that get attached to sky-watching events. But the one on Sunday really is worth a look — it's the first total eclipse that's also a supermoon and a blood moon in more than three decades.

Saudi Arabia is defending itself against criticism after a stampede in Mecca killed at least 717 hajj pilgrims and injured more than 850 others — the worst such incident in a quarter century.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET: Four Dead Were Students

A multi-vehicle accident involving a charter bus, a Duck boat tour vehicle and two cars in central Seattle has left at least four people dead and several injured, authorities say. reports:

Croatia has locked down its border with Serbia in an effort to stem the flow of thousands of refugees across the border.

Joanna Kakissis, reporting from the border region, says Serbia has closed its border to Croatians in retaliation. "Trucks are backed up for 8 miles on the highway to the border crossing at Batrovci [Serbia]," she says.

Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban on Thursday called the European Union's quota system for member nations to share the burden of resettling migrants "seriously flawed."

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

Pope Francis departed Washington, D.C., this afternoon, bound for New York, the second to last stop on his U.S. tour. Once in New York, he will celebrate Vespers, an evening prayer, at St. Patrick's cathedral around 7 p.m.

Earlier today, the pontiff delivered a historic speech before a joint meeting of Congress and ate lunch with low-income and homeless people at Catholic Charities in Washington, D.C.