Rob Dillard

Correspondent

Rob Dillard is a Des Moines based correspondent for Iowa Public Radio. He joined IPR in 2001 as host of Morning Edition and moved to reporting in 2007.  He has been on special assignment for IPR since early 2011 reporting the ongoing series “Being in Iowa.” It has taken him around the state shining light on small segments of the population, including Muslims, military veterans, Latinos and the physically disabled. The series has won awards from the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) and Northwest Broadcast News Association (NBNA).

Rob has extensive experience in radio, newspaper and media relations dating back more than 30 years. He has also taught news writing at Central College in Pella. Rob earned his bachelor’s degree in mass communications at the University of Iowa.

Rob’s favorite public radio program is Morning Edition.

Ways To Connect

All this week, Iowa Public Radio has been bringing you a series of stories about home schooled students. We’ve met several parents who have chosen to take charge of their children’s education for a variety of reasons. Occasionally, they seek help, especially as their kids get older. In today’s story, reporter Rob Dillard tells us that many of them turn to publicly supported Home School Assistance Programs.

Today, we continue our week-long series “Being Home Schooled in Iowa.” As we heard in yesterday’s segment, a significant number of parents who decide to home school do so to follow their religious convictions. But Iowa Public Radio’s Rob Dillard has discovered there are many reasons families choose to keep their children out of public and private schools.

Being in Iowa is funded in part by The Principal Financial Group Foundation and Alliant Energy.

More than a third of families who home school nationwide do it for religious purposes. That’s by far the Number One reason for keeping kids out of public or private schools. These parents say they want to be in charge of building the moral character of their children, and not leave it to teachers or peer groups. Reporter Rob Dillard looks into the significance of faith in home education.

Iowa Public Radio returns today to its ongoing series, “Being in Iowa.” This week, reporter Rob Dillard asks what does it mean to be home schooled in the state? He begins our series by examining the law that applies to home schools.

Being in Iowa is funded in part by The Principal Financial Group Foundation and Alliant Energy.

All this week we've been hearing what it's like to come out to family and friends, or deal with bullying as part of "Being Gay in Iowa." Host Ben Kieffer talks with four Iowans who share their experiences with these issues and more... from running for political office as an openly gay candidate, to being put in the spotlight as part of the battle over same sex marriage.  Guests include Nate Monson, Executive Director of Iowa Safe Schools; Sharon Malheiro, Chair of One Iowa; Kate Varnum, plaintiff in Varnum v.

Today, Iowa Public Radio continues its series “Being Gay in Iowa.” Many same-sex couples have children. Some had them while in opposite-sex marriages before coming out. Others are becoming parents through sperm donors or adoption. What is life like for these kids who were raised in homes that are out-of-the-norm? Reporter Rob Dillard introduces us to some young people whose family life made them a curiosity while growing up.

Today, Iowa Public Radio continues its week-long series “Being Gay in Iowa.” It’s often a tumultuous experience when young people acknowledge they’re gay. It opens them up for teasing and downright bullying from classmates.  In part-four of our series, reporter Rob Dillard looks into what’s being done in Iowa to protect gay students from the taunts of their peers.

Today we have Part Three of our week-long series “Being Gay in Iowa.”  Often, the most emotionally stressful time in a gay person’s life is when they come out to their family and friends. The announcement is so difficult for many, they don’t make it until middle age, after they’ve been married and raised children.  It’s getting easier for younger gays, who are coming out in high school or even before.  Iowa Public Radio’s Rob Dillard met with a number of gay Iowans to find out what it was like to step out of the closet.

Today we continue our exploration of what it means to be gay in Iowa. Members of various faith communities approach questions surrounding gay lifestyles from widely different perspectives. Some church leaders were quite vocal in protesting the Iowa Supreme Court ruling that allowed same-sex couples to marry. Others were among the first clergy to lead marriage ceremonies for gays and lesbians as soon as they were able. Iowa Public Radio’s Rob Dillard looks into the divide among religions on matters of gay rights.

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