Ari Shapiro

Ari Shapiro has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from five continents. (Sorry, Australia.)

In 2015, Shapiro joined Kelly McEvers, Audie Cornish and Robert Siegel as a weekday co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine.

Shapiro was previously NPR's International Correspondent based in London, from where he traveled the world covering a wide range of topics for NPR's national news programs.

Shapiro joined NPR's international desk in 2014 after four years as White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. In 2012, Shapiro embedded with the presidential campaign of Republican Mitt Romney. He was NPR Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering one of the most tumultuous periods in the Department's history.

Shapiro is a frequent guest analyst on television news programs, and his reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, L'Olympia in Paris, and Mount Lycabettus in Athens.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Today, President-elect Donald Trump spoke by phone to Tsai Ing-wen, the president of Taiwan. That breaks nearly four decades of diplomatic protocol and threatens to upset U.S. relations with China. NPR's Rob Schmitz joins us to talk about this. Hi, Rob. ROB SCHMITZ, BYLINE: Hi, Ari. SHAPIRO: Donald Trump has had so many telephone conversations with world leaders. Explain why this one with the leader of Taiwan is so...

In this season of indulgence (and overindulgence), some people will turn to the treadmill, while others turn to the Pepto-Bismol. Author Brad Thomas Parsons will reach for the bottle — specifically, a bottle full of a liqueur called amaro, which people have used as a digestive aid for centuries. It's an herbal recipe, and "it's actually bittersweet," Parsons says. "The bittering agents in it are actually helping your digestive system," he explains. "Four out of five doctors may not agree with...

By the time a group of high school students showed up at Richard Moss' home in 1980, he was an old man in his 80s. He was a master of shape-note singing — a remarkable old style of music he learned from his elders, who learned it from their elders in the mountains of northern Georgia. The students wanted to document the tradition for their magazine, Foxfire . Named after a bioluminescent fungus that glows in the hills of North Georgia on certain summer nights, Foxfire started in 1966, when an...

This is a big weekend for matzo ball soup. Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, starts Sunday night, and chef Pati Jinich wants all the matzo-ball makers out there to understand: The soup doesn't care whether you prefer floaters or sinkers. "It turns out that matzo balls are insanely capricious," Jinich says. "One Friday, they're like, you can have me fluffy. And the other week is like, this is what you'll get." Matzo ball soup is a classic recipe straight from Eastern Europe — typically...

In every field, there are people whose behind-the-scenes work ripples out; whose vision helps define the way we live, work or play. In fashion, Grace Coddington is one of those people. Many people first heard of Coddington through The September Issue , the 2009 documentary about American Vogue . She's been a top editor there for nearly 30 years, directing the photo spreads that appear in the magazine. She helps choose the clothes, setting and models, and she works with the photographer to...

Sometimes the world can feel a bit uniform: the same department stores in every shopping mall, the same fast food chains on every corner. The website Atlas Obscura will make you reconsider that sense of monotony. "The world is still this huge, bizarre, vast place filled with astounding stuff," says co-founder Dylan Thuras. "And if you sort of tilt your view a little bit and start looking for it, you start finding it everywhere." Thuras' new book, also called Atlas Obscura , is a guide to the...

The building rises — bronze and "brooding," in the words of architect David Adjaye — floating in a sea of white marble and limestone on the sprawling National Mall in Washington, D.C. The mission of the National Museum of African American History and Culture — set to open to the public next week after a 100-year journey into existence — is to tell the story of America through the lens of black history and culture. That mission is reflected in the exhibits and encapsulated in a Langston Hughes...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: For months I have been watching as a fantastic new building has risen on the National Mall here in Washington. The long awaited Smithsonian Museum of African-American History and Culture will open its doors later this month. It promises to tell the American story through the lens of African-American history and culture. That mission is reflected not just in its exhibits but in the building itself. Our co-host Ari...

Evelyn and Grattan Betancourt bought their "forever" home in 1986. It's two-stories tall, with a brick front and a wide lawn. Some evenings, deer come out of the woods and linger in their yard. "This was our first, and it'll be our only home," says Evelyn. The Betancourts live in Fort Washington, Md., located in one of the wealthiest majority-black counties in the United States: Prince George's , just east of Washington, D.C. The median income in the county of about 900,000 people is $73,000...

In Baton Rouge, La., people are using whatever tools they have to help their community recover from the flood. That includes cameras. Four photographers have been creating portraits of those affected. Their project, "Humans of the Water," focuses not on what people lost, but on what they saved. One of those photographers is Collin Richie. He says documentary photography isn't typically his style. Most of his work involves snapping photos for weddings, magazines and corporate advertisements....

Out on the wide open plains of West Texas, you can see the horizon for 360 degrees, interrupted only by the nodding up and down of pump jacks pulling oil up out of the earth. There lies the aptly named town of Midland. To get the hang of the place, you need to start downtown, on a corner near the Chase Bank, where an electric billboard displays the essentials: the temperature, a message — "God Bless Midland" — and a number. On this day, it's 45.94. That number — the price of oil by the barrel...

What does it mean to be middle class in America? Nearly a century ago, in Detroit — which was then the burning core of the country's middle class — the answer might have looked like a hot dog: a Detroit Coney, to be precise. At its most basic, a Detroit Coney is a kind of chili dog — "a steamed bun, with a natural-casing hot dog, beef and pork," explains Joe Grimm, author of the book Coney Detroit. "And on top of that hot dog — which should be grilled, not boiled, not deep-fried — goes the...

In the U.S., affordable housing has always been a big concern for poor people. Now in some of America's biggest cities, "middle class" families can't afford the rent. And that is making affordable housing a more important issue for the elected leaders who run these cities. As part of the All Things Considered series "The New Middle," a look at what it means to be middle class in America today, NPR's Ari Shapiro went to the most expensive city in the country to see what happens when you earn a...

While covering the aftermath of the shooting at Pulse in Orlando, Fla., NPR's Ari Shapiro realized he had gone to the nightclub more than a decade ago. "We saw you there by yourself and wanted to make sure you were, you know, part of the group," recalls Nathan Jokers, a former Pulse bartender. "We didn't want you to feel alone." You can listen to their conversation at the audio link above. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In a remote corner of eastern India, far in the jungle and hours by boat from any village, there is a camp with a brightly colored shrine to a forest goddess. Behind a tall fence, a statue of Bonbibi wears silks and garlands, with a gold headdress. She shelters a boy from a tiger. Every day, forest guard Bhabotaron Paik prostrates himself before the goddess and makes an offering of sweets before he goes out on patrol. When he has finished the ritual — the puja — Paik explains that protection...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In a dimly lit hut made of mud and straw, a shaft of sunlight slices through a hole in the ceiling and lands on a bag of rice. Debendra Tarek, 80, pulls out a handful of the rough brown grains and holds them up to the beam of light. His bare chest is sunken, and his eyes glow deep in their sockets. "This resists the saltwater," the village elder explains through an interpreter. This variety of rice, he says, allows his family to remain here on Ghoramara, the island where they were born....

Waiting quietly in the living room of a home in an upscale New Delhi neighborhood are a dozen people of all ages — maids, security guards, construction workers, all of whom earn at most a few dollars a day. The elegant, plant-filled room is hushed except for the sound of coughing. Over in the next room, Dr. Gita Prakash is at her dining table with a stethoscope pressed to a pregnant woman's chest. Prakash has been treating indigent patients here for 30 years, six nights a week, in the...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dx06c0ZEBMk http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGze8bbBQ-A http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nck6BZga7TQ When James Corden took over The Late Late Show one year ago, the question on everyone's mind was, "James who?" He was big in the U.K. In the U.S. he had starred in the movie Into the Woods and won a Tony for the play One Man, Two Guvnors on Broadway. But beyond that, he was relatively unknown. So it's kind of unreal that after just one year in the chair, his show...

A few months ago, when we were in Toledo, Ohio, we spotted a small item in the Toledo City Paper about a tattoo artist named Brian Finn. Finn has been tattooing for nearly 20 years. These days, he does it on his days off, too — but not for just anyone. On those days, he's creating tattoos for people with scars caused by trauma: domestic violence, human trafficking or self-inflicted. And he's offering these tattoos free. "Otherwise, you know, they wouldn't be able to get that done. Maybe they...

In Flint, Mich., government officials allowed water from the Flint River to corrode the city's pipes, leaching lead and other toxins into the tap water. The damaged pipes continue to contaminate the water, and it could take months — or years — to repair and rebuild the water system. It could take even longer to rebuild something more abstract: trust, between citizens and their government. Roxanne Adair, a vendor at the local farmers market, says this goes deeper than just the water. "So many...

The problems with high lead levels in Flint, Mich.'s water started in April 2014, when the city switched water sources and began drawing its supply from the Flint River. The new water was harder, and government officials allowed it to corrode the city's pipes, leaching lead and other toxins into the tap water. Even though the city switched back to its original supply in October 2015, the damaged pipes continue to contaminate the water, and Flint's nearly 100,000 residents don't know when the...

In Flint, Mich., families are using bottled water to do everything — from cooking to bathing. The tap water is still unsafe to drink after government officials allowed corroded lead pipes to poison the water. People in Flint have lots of questions for those officials. Perhaps the biggest is the one Hattie Collins has. " When are you gonna fix it? And I mean fix it right," she says. On a recent day, Collins is distributing bottled water at Triumph Church in Flint. A massive 18-wheeler is...

Hillary Clinton walks a daily tightrope between attacking Republicans and trumpeting her ability to work with them. Republicans "seem to be very fact averse," she told me in an interview, shortly after saying "I'm interested in us solving problems together."

I met the Democratic presidential candidate in San Antonio, Texas, for a wide-ranging conversation before a campaign fund-raiser at a fancy hotel. We talked about immigration, the private email server she used as secretary...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEPHEN MARCUS: Hello, everyone. UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Hello. UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Hi. MARCUS: You're on the Gangster London Tour. This thing here... ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: We're walking through East London, where I lived until a few months ago. The actor Stephen Marcus is giving about 20 people a tour of this city's gritty, glamorous, bloody gangster past. MARCUS: So that brings me to the infamous Kray twins. Here they are....

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: This story tells us what it feels like to finish a global deal on climate change. In a word, the feeling is tired. Negotiators have been racing to complete the agreement in Paris. It's described as an effort, however limited, to head off the very worst effects of climate change around the world. Our colleague Christopher Joyce reports that negotiators have worked out the deal but have not formally...

Nearly 200 countries are attending the Paris climate summit and nearly every one has something at stake. Yet it's hard to find anyone with more on the line than Tony de Brum, the foreign minister for the Marshall Islands. "The Marshall Islands covers an area of approximately a million square miles of ocean. Many people call us a small island state. I prefer to be called a large ocean state," de Brum says. The islands sit in the Pacific, far west of Hawaii, with a population of more than 70...

At the U.N. climate summit in Paris, the U.S. has a big footprint. Cabinet officials scurry from meeting to meeting, trying to get a binding deal that would help some 200 countries slow the planet's warming. Yet in some ways, the United States is an outlier. "Everybody else is taking climate change really seriously," President Obama said during his visit to Paris at the start of the summit. "They think it's a really big problem." As the president acknowledged, he leads one of the few advanced...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Here's a question. If a pregnant woman does drugs and her baby is born dependent, should the mother be prosecuted for harming the child? In Tennessee and Alabama, the answer is yes. Tennessee's fetal assault law has been on the books for a year and half. It's controversial, and other states are considering similar laws. I went to Tennessee to meet some of the people at the center of this debate, and I...

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