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Shots - Health News
3:02 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

What Health-Minded Smartphone Users Have In Common With Obama Voters

Elizabeth Ball checks her phone while waiting to vote Monday in Bowling Green, Ohio.
J.D. Pooley AP

Maybe I've got too many election results on my brain.

But the Pew Research Center's report about how people are using their mobile phones to get health information sent me to the data from the exit polls. Really.

Why?

The bottom line of the Pew report is that cellphone "owners who are Latino, African American, between the ages of 18-49, or hold a college degree are also more likely to gather health information" than other people on their mobile phones.

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The Salt
2:52 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

J.R. Ewing And A Found Recipe For Poppy Seed Cookies

Poppy seed cookies bring back memories of watching Dallas with Aunt Ida, the Brass Sisters say.
Maren Caruso Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 5:44 pm

During the holidays, family kitchens are ground zero for intense craziness: mixers whirling, timers buzzing, knives flying. So yes, it's understandable that many of us just stay out of way of the experienced cook. Especially when the knives come out and Mama is talking under her breath.

But by staying out, you're missing out.

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Author Interviews
2:16 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

'Crushing Eastern Europe' Behind The 'Iron Curtain'

Courtesy of Doubleday

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 3:47 pm

If you read Anne Applebaum's Iron Curtain as a manual on how to take over a state and turn it totalitarian, the first lesson, she says, would be on targeted violence. Applebaum's book, which was recently nominated for a National Book Award, describes how after World War II, the Soviet Union found potential dissidents everywhere.

"It really meant anybody who had a leadership role in society," she tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "This included priests, people who had been politicians, people who had been merchants before the war, and people who ran youth groups."

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The Two-Way
2:07 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Pentagon Says Iran Fired On Unarmed U.S. Drone Flying Over Persian Gulf

In this Sept. 6, 2007 photo, an MQ-1 Predator unmanned aerial vehicle flies over a range in Nevada.
MSgt. Scott Reed AP

Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said that Iranian warplanes fired on an unarmed U.S. drone in the Persian Gulf on Nov. 1.

According to Reuters, Little said the MQ1 Predator drone, which returned safely to its base, was in international waters at the time. Reuters adds:

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NPR Story
1:56 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Author Warns 'Second Nuclear Age' Is Here

Second Nuclear Age

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 7:34 am

Since the end of the Cold War, many Americans have come to the conclusion we don't need nuclear weapons anymore and ought to focus on reduction of stockpiles as quickly as possible. The problem, according to Yale professor Paul Bracken, is that the other countries that have nuclear weapons view them very differently.

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Shots - Health News
1:34 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Polio Hides Out In A Few 'Sanctuaries' In Nigeria

Ado Ibrahim carries his son Aminu through a village in northern Nigeria. Aminu, 4, was paralyzed by polio in August.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 3:05 pm

Nigeria is the world's epicenter for polio. It's the only place where cases are ticking up, and it's been the source of outbreaks in other countries since 2003.

There was a disappointing update from public health officials Thursday about the polio situation in Nigeria. Despite beefed-up efforts to vaccinate kids and a flood of new resources, Nigeria still hasn't turned the corner on polio.

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Asia
1:03 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

In China, A Transition Of Power Begins

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 1:34 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

The contrast couldn't be clearer. On Tuesday night, crowds gathered to watch election returns. The candidates and their nervous supporters had no way to know who'd win. In Beijing, as the Communist Party Congress gathered, the government cleared Tiananmen Square to create an eerie scene one observer described as post-apocalyptic. China's new leaders are being chosen in secret and few have any idea how they proposed to direct policy.

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Election 2012
1:03 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

What Did The Billions The Campaigns Spent Buy?

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 1:34 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Before the election recedes too far, there are a couple more takeaways that deserve attention. One is the money. Spending in the 2012 campaign reached record heights. Some estimates put the total at more than $6 billion, and the new outside groups, the superPACs and the nonprofits, spent more than a billion to buy maybe one million television ads. In a moment, the effect of that unprecedented flow of cash.

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From Our Listeners
1:03 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Letters: Hurricane Sandy And The Snow Storm

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 1:34 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

With all the election news, we couldn't get to it earlier, so it's Thursday and time to get to your comments.

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The Two-Way
12:52 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Pee-peegate: 3-Year-Old's Whiz Leads To $2,500 'Public Urination' Ticket

Dillan Warden, the little guy who had to go.
KCTV

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 1:21 pm

While we were busy paying attention to storms and presidential politics earlier this week, we missed a story from Oklahoma that may just (insert four-letter euphemism for urine here) you off.

It seems that when 3-year-old Dillan Warden of Piedmont, Okla., (no joke!) had to "go" on Sunday he did what many little guys will do:

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Asia
12:32 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Highly Scripted, China Moves Toward New Leaders

Chinese Communist Party leaders attend the opening session of the 18th Communist Party Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, on Thursday. The meeting marks the beginning of a once-in-a-decade transfer of power.
Alexander F. Yuan AP

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 7:31 pm

Two days after the U.S. election, another major political development is unfolding on the other side of the world. China began its once-in-a-decade transition of power on Thursday with the opening of its 18th Communist Party Congress.

With its lack of personalities or political platforms, it is almost diametrically opposed to the hurly-burly of U.S. elections. In Beijing, the message was about fighting corruption and keeping the Communist Party in power.

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It's All Politics
12:13 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Once Again, Florida's Voting Doesn't Add Up

A Miami-Dade Elections Department employee tallies absentee ballot reports in Doral, Fla., on Thursday.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 5:43 pm

Florida is again having problems determining the winner of its presidential vote. But its difficulties are entirely different from the ones that kept the nation in suspense for more than a month back in 2000.

"It was just a convergence of things that were an embarrassment to Florida," says Susan MacManus, a political scientist at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

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Music Reviews
11:34 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Samuel Yirga Ushers In A Golden Age Of Ethiopian Music

Samuel Yirga plays Ethiopian standards with a voracious talent that helps him savor each musical flavor.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 11:09 am

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The Two-Way
11:22 am
Thu November 8, 2012

With Giffords In Courtroom, Loughner Will Sentenced For Shooting Spree

In this artist rendering, Jared Lee Loughner, right, makes a court appearance with his lawyer, Judy Clarke, at the Sandra Day O'Connor United States Courthouse in Phoenix, Ariz. in January.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 5:02 pm

Update at 2:13 p.m. ET. Life In Prison:

Jared Loughner, the 24-year-old who pleaded guilty to killing six people and wounding 13 others during a shooting spree at a congressional meet-and-greet in Tucson, Ariz., will spend the rest of his life in prison.

Loughner was sentenced today as a U.S. District Court in Tucson, Ariz.

Before the judge handed down his punishment, victims and their families addressed Loughner and the court.

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Education
11:10 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Challenges Of Going From War Zone To The Classroom

Hundreds of thousands of service members are transitioning from bases to college campuses. As Americans get ready for Veterans Day, host Michel Martin discusses the challenges veterans face, and the programs that help them succeed. She talks with Meg Mitcham, a veteran and the head of veterans programs for the American Council on Education.

Economy
11:06 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Can Bipartisanship Save Us From The Fiscal Cliff?

The election is over and the deadline for the so-called "fiscal cliff" is drawing closer. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax about how the two relate, and what it could mean for America's economic future.

The Two-Way
10:53 am
Thu November 8, 2012

7.2 Magnitude Earthquake Kills At Least 52 In Guatemala

A relative mourns the ten members of the Vasquez family who died in the earthquake in the San Cristobal Cuchu municipality in San Marcos, Guatemala.
Johan Ordonez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 2:50 pm

Guatemalans are picking up the pieces of a massive 7.2 magnitude earthquake that struck the country's Pacific coast on Wednesday.

According to Guatemala's Prensa Libre, the temblor left 52 dead and 22 others are missing.

The BBC reports that this is the strongest quake to hit the country since 1976.

The BBC adds:

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It's All Politics
10:51 am
Thu November 8, 2012

5 Foul-Ups In The Romney Campaign

Mitt Romney talks to reporters on his campaign plane on Election Day. "I'm very proud of the campaign we've run," he said. "No campaign is perfect."
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 11:37 am

File this under the Strange Case of the 2012 Presidential Campaign. It was a long, tortuous trip that ended up at a very familiar destination: the re-election of President Obama.

But along the way, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney did garner more electoral votes than a lot of losers, including John McCain in 2008, Bob Dole in 1996 or Jimmy Carter in 1980.

Romney must have done some things right. And he must have done some things wrong.

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The Two-Way
9:19 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Word To The Wise: Change Your Twitter Password

Twitter.com

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 11:23 am

The news is spreading that Twitter is warning quite a few users that their accounts may have been compromised and that they should immediately change their passwords.

TechCrunch says, "keep your eyes peeled Twitter users: Twitter is sending out emails to some of its users telling them it has reset their password and asking them to create a new one."

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The Two-Way
8:46 am
Thu November 8, 2012

McDonald's Has First Drop In Key Sales Figure Since 2003

The golden arches at a McDonald's restaurant in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 8:50 pm

Fast-food giant McDonald's said today that revenue at its restaurants that have been open at least 13 months fell 1.8 percent in October — the first time it has suffered a month-to-month decline in that key indicator since April 2008, according to BloombergBusinessweek.

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The Two-Way
7:44 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Jobless Claims Fell By 8,000 Last Week; Superstorm Sandy Might Be Factor

Job-related booklets at a New York State Department of Labor Employment Services office in Brooklyn.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

There were 355,000 first-time claims for unemployment insurance last week, down by 8,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration says.

But a measure designed to show the trend edged up: "The 4-week moving average was 370,500, an increase of 3,250 from the previous week's unrevised average of 367,250."

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The Two-Way
7:22 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Three More Stories That Help Explain Why Obama Won

Some of the faces of those who supported the president, at his victory rally Tuesday in Chicago.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

NPR.org's Scott Neuman wrote earlier about how "a mixture of demographics, superior organization and a few tactical missteps from Republicans" helped President Obama win the battleground states.

From this morning's post-election analyses of the presidential campaign, here are three more looks at why Obama was re-elected Tuesday:

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Texas Judge Who Beat His Daughter Is Reinstated To Bench

Hillary Adams (left) as her father was striking her with a belt. She set up a video camera to record what she says was one of many such beatings.
YouTube.com (warning, video is graphic)

There was outrage across the nation last November when video of a 2004 beating that a local judge in Texas gave to his 16-year-old daughter went viral.

Within days, Aransas County Court-at-Law Judge William Adams was suspended by the State Commission on Judicial Conduct.

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Around the Nation
6:27 am
Thu November 8, 2012

App Lets You Write Poetry Like William Shatner

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Fans of William Shatner out there with a yen to write poetry, there's an app for you. The Shatoetry app allows users to compose poems from 400 words recorded by the former Star Trek captain in his signature staccato voice, like this example on YouTube.

WILLIAM SHATNER: She who lives with caffeine joyously fears not the dark.

MONTAGNE: Shatoetry on MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:21 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Brothel Owner Wins County Commissioner Election

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with congratulations to Lance Gilman. He's a newly elected member of the county commission in Storey County, Nevada. Mr. Gilman is a business owner, who won 62 percent of the vote. But as he takes office, Gilman is unlikely to be one of those people who disparages politics by, say, comparing it to a brothel, because Gilman runs a legal brothel, one of the most famous in the country: Nevada's Mustang Ranch. You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:08 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Nor'easter Adds Fear To Misery In N.Y. And N.J.

The snow this morning in Manhattan's Central Park, where several inches fell.
Margot Adler NPR

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 11:25 am

  • Martin Kaste on 'Morning Editon'

Still struggling to recover from Superstorm Sandy, parts of New Jersey, New York City and surrounding regions are today digging out from a Nor'easter that dropped several inches of snow (more in some places) and caused more power outages.

We're following the news about the impact of the latest storm.

Update at noon, ET. Getting The Power Back On In New Jersey:

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Around the Nation
5:23 am
Thu November 8, 2012

N.Y. Schools Scramble To Relocate Storm Victims

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Most of New York City's one million public school students went back to class on Monday, a week after Sandy hit. Still dozens of school buildings were flooded, damaged, without power so their students had to relocate. Beth Fertig of member station WNYC visited one of those schools in its new location on Staten Island.

BETH FERTIG, BYLINE: Intermediate School 2 is almost a mile away from the beach. But when the surge of water came during Hurricane Sandy, Principal Adrian Stallone(ph) says it flooded the basement.

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Election 2012
5:05 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Calif. Affirms Death Penalty, Amends 'Three Strikes'

Mike Reynolds authored California's three-strikes law after his daughter, Kimber, was killed in a 1992 purse snatching. On Tuesday, Californians approved a ballot initiative that weakens the law — a measure Reynolds opposed.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 11:15 am

Several thousand prisoners in California may be eligible to apply for sentence reductions, after voters overwhelmingly approved a ballot initiative Tuesday that alters the state's controversial three-strikes law.

But voters also rejected a proposition that would abolish the death penalty in the state. Proposition 34 would have replaced capital punishment with life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.

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NPR Story
4:35 am
Thu November 8, 2012

South Africa Bank Notes Feature Nelson Mandela

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is Mandela money.

That's Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid leader and first black president of South Africa. He's now also the first black person to grace South Africa's currency.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:35 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Syrian Opposition Groups Try To Reinvigorate Mission

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Opposition groups working to bring down the regime in Syria are meeting in Doha, Qatar in a furious bid to reorganize and reinvigorate themselves. The aim is to form a legitimate government in exile that would be recognized by the international community. This new effort to bring together the Syrian opposition is strongly backed by the U.S. NPR's Kelly McEvers is in Doha and joins us to talk about it.

And let's start by you telling us exactly who is there.

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