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The Two-Way
7:42 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Top Stories: Boston Bombings; Midwest Floods; Texas Explosion

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 11:52 am

Good morning.

Our early headlines:

-- Boston Bombings: Monday's Developments; (our running coverage).

-- Midwest's Floods Aren't Over, But So Far, So Good.

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Around the Nation
7:05 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Golden Retrievers Sent To Help Boston Heal

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. As Boston begins healing, they are getting a little help from man's best friend. Five Golden Retrievers: Addie, Isaiah, Luther, Maggie and Ruthie. They're comfort dogs sent by Lutheran Church Charities in Illinois. One of their jobs: just be ready if someone needs a friend to hug.

The Two-Way
7:01 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Midwest's Floods Aren't Over, But So Far, So Good

As the Mississippi River has risen in St. Louis, the city's Lewis and Clark statue has — as often happens in the spring — been partially submerged.
Bill Greenblatt UPI /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 11:51 am

The good news is that "the big river didn't get too big," The St. Louis Post-Dispatch writes this morning.

"Sandbags held back the cresting Mississippi River from several towns north of St. Louis on Sunday," it adds, "while the forecast for the immediate vicinity remained high but manageable."

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Around the Nation
6:58 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Jogging Banned From Baskett Slough Wildlife Refuge

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Running can be good for you but apparently, is bad for animals. People who like to run through the Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge were stunned by a new sign. According to the Statesman Journal, the signs at a trailhead there say: No Dogs, Horseback Riding and No Jogging. Hiking is apparently fine. Wildlife officials warn that running people can stress out the animals, and might even interfere with their breeding.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Record
6:42 am
Mon April 22, 2013

The Ghostface Killah Rises Again

Adrian Younge (left) and Ghostface onstage at the Seattle stop of their tour last week.
Erich Donaldson

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 1:26 pm

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The Two-Way
6:17 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Book News: E.L. Konigsburg, 'Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler' Author, Dies

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 11:04 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
6:17 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Tsarnaev Charged: Suspected Boston Bomber Accused Of Using WMD

A sign reading "Flying With Angels Krystle Campbell," is seen Monday as a passing MBTA bus with "Boston Strong" displayed on its message board drives through Medford, Mass. A funeral service for Campbell, one of the three people killed in the marathon bombings, was held later in the day.
C.J. Gunther EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 7:07 pm

(Most recent update: 7:00 p.m. ET.)

The surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings was charged Monday with using a weapon of mass destruction to kill three people and wound more than 200 in what FBI investigators said evidence shows was a coldly calculated attack.

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Analysis
5:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Lawmakers Weigh In On Boston Bombing Case

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Members of Congress are already weighing in on how they think the Boston suspect should be questioned and tried. And some are also questioning whether the FBI is sufficiently vigilant against terrorists in the wake of last week.

Joining us as she does most Mondays is Cokie Roberts. Cokie, good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS: Hi, David.

GREENE: Well, there was quite a difference of opinion on the Sunday talk shows yesterday about whether Dzhokhar Tsarnaev should be tried in a military court or a civilian one.

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NPR Story
4:55 am
Mon April 22, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now solar power has had its problems in recent decades. For years, solar panels were too expensive to compete. More recently, as we heard earlier in the business news, solar panels got so cheap that manufacturers ran into trouble. But solar energy had a signal achievement in March, and that is our last word in business today.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:55 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Rap Genius Annotates Song Verses

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK, lets meet a couple of guys who are big fans of Ghostface Killah.

MAHBOD MOGHADAM: The best Ghostface song, I think, is " Nutmeg." That's all of his...

GREENE: That's Mahbod Moghadam. He and his friend Tom Lehman co-founded a Web site called Rap Genius.

MOGHADAM: Tom is here looking up...

TOM LEHMAN: These are my favorite lines of Ghost. It's from "Buck 50," where he says: supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, docialiexpilisticfragicalsuper Wu-Tang Chamber. Cancun catch me in the a room eating grouper...

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NPR Story
4:55 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Explosion Fails To Divide Texas Community

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's check in on another major story that dominated our attention last week, a fertilizer plant that caught fire and exploded in Texas. We can now say that 14 people were killed and 200 injured. But those numbers alone do not quite capture the impact of this disaster.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

To understand that, recall that the disaster with that scale came in a city of fewer than 3,000 people.

NPR's John Burnett reports from West.

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Shots - Health News
2:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Scammers Find Fertile Ground In Health Law

Confusion over the details of the new health care law is leaving many people vulnerable to con artists. Evelyne Lois Such, 86, was recently the target of an attempted scam.
Matt Nager for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

One recent morning, Evelyne Lois Such was sitting at her kitchen table in Denver when the phone rang. Such, who's 86, didn't recognize the phone number or the deep voice on the other end of the line.

"He asked, 'Are you a senior?' and I said yes, and he said, 'Well, we are sending out all new Medicare cards, and I want to make sure I have all your statistics just correct,' " Such recalls.

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Shots - Health News
2:26 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Young Adults With Autism Can Thrive In High-Tech Jobs

Amelia Schabel, 23, works with art director Andrew LaBounty at the nonPareil Institute in Plano, Texas.
Courtesy of nonPareil

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 2:07 pm

The job hunt is complicated enough for most high school and college graduates — and even tougher for the growing number of young people on the autism spectrum. Despite the obstacles that people with autism face trying to find work, there's a natural landing place: the tech industry.

Amelia Schabel graduated from high school five years ago. She had good grades and enrolled in community college. But it was too stressful. After less than a month she was back at home, doing nothing.

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Business
2:24 am
Mon April 22, 2013

This Building Is Supergreen. Will It Be Copied?

This Seattle building, a project by the Bullitt Foundation, is said to be the world's greenest office building. It uses a weather station to conserve energy, creates lighting via photovoltaic cells on the roof and features composting toilets.
Courtesy of John Stamets

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:18 am

One of the world's greenest office buildings formally open its doors Monday — Earth Day. It's a project of the environmentally progressive Bullitt Foundation. Its ambition is bold: to showcase an entirely self-sustaining office building hoping that others will create similar projects.

The first thing that strikes you about the new Bullitt Center is the windows. Walking up to the building in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood, six stories of floor-to-ceiling glass soars above you.

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The Salt
2:22 am
Mon April 22, 2013

How Coffee Brings The World Together

The best coffee comes from high altitudes with a warm climate like in Huehuetenango, Guatemala.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 2:51 pm

Coffee is more than a drink. For many of us — OK, for me — it's woven into the fabric of every day.

It also connects us to far corners of the globe.

For instance, every Friday, a truck pulls up to the warehouse of Counter Culture Coffee, a small roaster and coffee distributor in Durham, N.C., and unloads a bunch of heavy burlap sacks.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
2:20 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Want More Gender Equality At Work? Go To An Emerging Market

Petrobras state-owned oil company CEO Maria das Gracas Silva Foster makes a speech during the Women's Forum Brazil 2012 in Sao Paulo, Brazil last year.
Yasuyoshi Chiba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 9:11 am

A White House report puts it bluntly: "Today, younger women are more likely to graduate from college than are men and are more likely to hold a graduate school degree."

For the past decade more American women than men have earned undergraduate and Master's degrees; and in the past three years, they've outpaced men at the doctoral level, too.

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Author Interviews
5:23 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

'Humanity' May Get Second Chance In Jean Thompson's New Novel

chuwy iStockphoto.com

In Jean Thompson's latest novel, The Humanity Project, humanity isn't doing so well and could use some help. Sean is a wayward carpenter whose bad luck with women turns into even worse luck: He's addicted to painkillers, and he and his teenage son Conner are facing eviction. Linnea is the teen survivor of a school shooting who travels west to California to live with a father she barely knows. Mrs. Foster is a wealthy woman who's taken to living with feral cats, and whose "Humanity Project" just might take a chance on people who thought they were out of luck.

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World
4:44 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Rare Churchill Poem Fails To Sell At Auction

A portrait of Winston Churchill in 1900, around the time he wrote "Our Modern Watchwords."
J.E. Purdy Library of Congress

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 5:23 pm

Around the turn of the 19th century, before he became Britain's revered prime minister, a young Winston Churchill found himself in South Africa. He was serving in the Army and as a war correspondent covering the Boer War.

One day, he put a blue pencil to army-issued notepaper and conveyed his thoughts about the conflict in a 40-line poem. More than a century later, "Our Modern Watchwords" was discovered by a retired manuscript dealer.

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All Tech Considered
4:18 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Philly Turns Skyscraper Into Video Game Screen For Tech Week

The Cira Centre, right, was illuminated Friday night with LED lights, transforming it into a giant screen to play the video game Pong.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 5:23 pm

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Music
4:18 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

A Folk Singer Sets Sail, With The Bard At The Bow

Amy Speace's latest album is called How to Sleep in a Stormy Boat.
Gina Binkley Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 5:23 pm

Before Amy Speace embarked on a career in music, the stage called her name. That's a good fact to keep in mind when listening to the actor-turned-folk singer's latest album, How to Sleep in a Stormy Boat.

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NPR Story
4:18 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

How Media Can Avoid Tripping Over Fast-Paced Developments

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 5:23 pm

Host Jacki Lyden speaks with Craig Silverman of the Poynter Institute about the problematic media coverage of the Boston bombings and other breaking news events. He discusses how journalists can avoid the all-too-common pitfalls when reporting on a developing story.

The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Antares Rocket Launch Is A Success, In Test Of Orbital Supply Vehicle

The Antares rocket lifts off from the launchpad at the NASA facility on Wallops Island Va., Sunday, beginning a test mission that has now been deemed a success. The Orbital Sciences Corp. rocket will eventually deliver supplies to the International Space Station.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 5:04 pm

The Antares rocket launch is back on for 5 p.m. ET Sunday afternoon, as engineers and spectators look for the rocket to lift off from a launch pad at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility. A check of all systems at 10 minutes before its launch was positive.

Update at 5:20 p.m. ET. Mission Called A Success:

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The Two-Way
2:44 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Midwest River Towns Ready Themselves For Cresting Floodwaters

In Clarksville, Mo., Bob Bailey adjusts a pump as he tries to keep floodwater from the Mississippi River out of a rental property Sunday. The small community has worked for days to build a makeshift sandbag levee.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 5:28 pm

Towns in Missouri, central Illinois and at least four other Midwestern states are under a flood warning, as heavy spring rains swell the Mississippi and other rivers to dangerously high crests. In some areas, rivers have already hit record flood levels.

In places where residents have been forced to evacuate their homes, the American Red Cross has set up shelters at schools and other facilities.

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The Two-Way
2:28 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Outrage Erupts In India Over 5-Year-Old Girl's Rape

Activists from India's main opposition party jostle with police outside Sonia Gandhi's residence on Sunday.
AP

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 9:28 pm

"What has changed?" That is the question echoing through Delhi on Sunday. Public frustration over sexual crimes against women is erupting again, this time over a gruesome sexual assault of a 5-year-old girl.

The protests are smaller than those that swept over the capital in December with the fatal gang-rape of a 23-year-old woman, but the incident has revived debate over the startling state of sexual violence in India.

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The Two-Way
1:23 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Hundreds Gather For Boston Memorial Service Near Marathon's Finish

People participate in an interfaith memorial service with members of six churches near the site of Monday's Boston Marathon bombings.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 7:26 am

Hundreds of Boston-area residents gathered Sunday to pray, to sing and to remember the victims of bombs and other violence in the city this week.

Six churches organized an interfaith service near the intersection of Boylston and Berkeley streets, close to the cordoned-off area where investigators are examining the crime scene created when two bombs tragically altered the finish of the 2013 Boston Marathon.

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The Salt
12:19 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Spirituality And Sprite, Aisle 1? What An Artist Sees In Wal-Mart

O'Connell also crowdsources the photographs he uses as fodder for his paintings. This piece, which shows men buying candies and Valentine's Day cards for their sweethearts, was based on a submission.
Courtesy of Brendan O'Connell

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 11:43 am

Most people would be hard-pressed to call Wal-Mart a source of artistic inspiration. A place to purchase peanut butter, cereal and other mundane necessities? Yes. But a rendezvous spot with transcendence? Hardly.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
11:47 am
Sun April 21, 2013

An Exploration Of The Changing Lives Of Women

Graphic designer Kaleena Porter sits with her dog, Moby, in the living room of her new home in Washington, D.C.
Marie McGrory NPR

Many revolutions begin with the sound of explosions and marching boots.

Now, another revolution is shaking up the world, and it's moving forward to the beep of alarm clocks and the clack of heels heading out.

Legions of women around the world are leaving their homes to join the paid labor force. Worldwide, 4 in 10 paid workers are female; in the coming decade, an estimated 1 billion more women will enter the formal workforce, pushing up economic growth.

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The Two-Way
11:07 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Miranda Rights And Tsarnaev: Ex-U.S. Attorney General Weighs In

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 3:06 pm

Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has not yet been questioned — but officials' decision not to read him his Miranda rights before interrogation is the subject of much debate.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
11:02 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Tragedy In Real Time: Living A Terrible Week, Vicariously

In Texas, veteran Bill Warren lowers a flag to half-staff in memory of victims from the West Fertilizer Co. explosion last week. The nation has absorbed the past six days of nonstop tragedy and relief in a firsthand-once-removed way that now defines our communal experiences.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 7:54 am

We have imagined ourselves searching like Kelly Manning for loved ones after the explosions on Boylston Street.

We have pictured ourselves huddling in the basement like Beth and Paul Robinson and their four children as bullets and bombs fly on our own city street.

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Sunday Night Forecast: Cloudy With A Chance Of Meteors

Another meteor shower, the Geminid, sparkled over the Spanish canary island of Tenerife on Dec. 13, 2012.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:49 am

Keep your eye on the sky Sunday evening; the Lyrid meteor shower is expected to peak. It's the first meteor shower of the spring season.

The Lyrid shower is caused by Earth passing through the orbit of a comet known as Thatcher, though the comet itself hasn't been seen since 1861. Dust particles from the comet will be seen as flashes of light as they burn up in our atmosphere.

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