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Goats and Soda
1:08 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

So How Did They Get That Crashed Plane Off The Runway In Kathmandu?

The nose of the Turkish Airlines plane rests on a flatbed tow truck several days after it slid off the tarmac at Kathmandu's international airport.
PRAKASH MATHEMA AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 3:12 pm

Maybe you read the story about the Turkish plane that crash-landed on March 4 in Kathmandu's Tribhuvan International Airport (TIA), skidding off the runway and plowing its nose into the rain-soaked grass.

Fortunately, no one was injured. Unfortunately, Nepal didn't know quite what to do about the Airbus 330 stuck on the single runway of its sole international airport.

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The Two-Way
12:36 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

No Hope Of Survivors In Black Hawk Crash, Military Says

After finding only debris and human remains in the area where a Black Hawk helicopter crashed in Florida Tuesday night with 11 people aboard, officials at Eglin Air Force Base say the mission has transitioned from a search and rescue into a recovery effort.

"At this point, we are not hopeful for survivors," said Col. Monte Cannon, vice-commander of the 96th Test Wing. "Our thoughts and prayers continue to be with the family members and the units where our soldiers and Marines call home."

Update at 1:30 p.m. ET: Two Soldiers Confirmed Dead

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Parallels
12:27 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

The West Bank Battle For Land ... And Water

The Bedouin camp has a black plastic water tank near a school built from mostly mud and tires.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sat March 14, 2015 12:45 pm

On Moshav Na'ama, a big Israeli farm in the West Bank inside the wide Jordan Valley, Inon Rosenblum raises fresh herbs for export.

He hires Palestinians to work the fields and pack the crops. The farm is 300 feet below sea level, a desert climate where irrigation is mandatory. Rosenblum won't say exactly how much water he uses, or exactly where it comes from.

"From wells," he says. "In the mountains." Then he changes the subject.

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The Two-Way
11:35 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Terry Pratchett, Prolific Fantasy Author, Dies At 66

Terry Pratchett at the 2012 South Bank Sky Arts Awards in London.
Ian Gavan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 6:56 am

Sir Terry Pratchett, the prolific author behind the Discworld series, has died at the age of 66. The British writer had struggled with a rare, early-onset form Alzheimer's disease for the better part of a decade.

His publisher, Transworld Books, confirmed news of the writer's death in a tweet Thursday morning.

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Shots - Health News
11:05 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Before The Gas Is Passed, Researchers Aim To Measure It In The Gut

Feces contain digested food residue and a wide variety of microorganisms, mostly bacteria, that are adapted to life in the intestines. The gases the microbes produce could help doctors and scientists track and understand changes related to health.
Scimat Scimat Photo Researchers/Getty Images

Electrical engineer Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh calls the stinking mixture puddled in jars inside his laboratory "fecal inocula."

The jars of fresh poop are instrumental to his research at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia to develop ways to scientifically analyze people's farts, something that the researchers believe could help them more easily track the activity of the human gut microbiome.

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Thu March 12, 2015

FCC Publishes Full Text Of Net Neutrality Rules

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 1:24 pm

Two weeks after it voted to approve rules on net neutrality, the Federal Communications Commission has released the full text of the Open Internet Order. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler calls it "a shining example of American democracy at work."

Wheeler also listed what he calls "bright-line rules" in the order. From his summary:

  • Ban Paid Prioritization: "Fast lanes" will not divide the Internet into "haves" and "have nots."
  • Ban Blocking: Consumers must get what they pay for — unfettered access to any lawful content on the Internet.
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Goats and Soda
10:01 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Meet The 15-Year-Old From Rural Guatemala Who Addressed The U.N.

Emelin, 15, spoke at the United Nations this week about her efforts to improve the health and education in her town in Guatemala.
Misha Friedman for NPR

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 1:56 pm

When Emelin was 13, she asked the mayor of her rural Guatemalan town to find ways to help girls stay in school and get better health care. He laughed out loud. "You are wasting my time; you should go home," he told Emelin and her friend Elba, who had come with her.

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The Two-Way
7:24 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Space Station Astronauts Make Safe Landing In Kazakhstan

The Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft is seen as it descends toward Earth, carrying NASA's Barry Wilmore and Russian flight engineers Alexander Samokutyaev and Elena Serova.
Bill Ingalls NASA

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 5:57 pm

After spending nearly six months on the International Space Station, an astronaut and two cosmonauts have landed safely back on Earth. While in orbit, they traveled almost 71 million miles, NASA says.

Cmdr. Barry Wilmore of NASA and flight engineers Alexander Samokutyaev and Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) touched down in Kazakhstan on Thursday morning, local time.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Ditching The Common Core Brings A Big Test For Indiana

Indiana squeezed the normal life cycle of a test—pilot, field, real—into one, massive exam that clocked in at 12 hours.
LA Johnson/NPR

Every eldest child knows all too well: Going first can be tough.

There's no one to help you pick the good teachers at school or give you advice on how to tell Mom and Dad about that fender bender.

Right now, Indiana is the firstborn, feeling its way through some thorny — and consequential — education decisions with little precedent to lean on.

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Europe
6:24 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Moscow City Hall Offers Handyman Services

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 6:37 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
6:21 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Iraqi Force Makes More Gains Toward Taking Tikrit From ISIS

Shiite militiamen pose with their banner (right) next to a captured — and upside-down — ISIS flag (left) in Tikrit, Iraq. Militias are bolstering Iraqi forces in a major operation to retake the city from the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
Mohammed al-Mozani AP

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 10:15 am

Pro-government forces in Iraq are making progress in the push to take back the city of Tikrit from the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or ISIS. Iraqi officials say the focus is now on the city's center, and that advances were still being slowed by bombs and booby traps.

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Around the Nation
5:52 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Lesson To Learn: Keep Your Eye On The Ball

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 6:37 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:10 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Twitter Updates Policy To Combat Revenge Porn

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 9:14 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:10 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Like The Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process, Area C Is Complicated

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 12:38 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:10 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Lower Oil Prices Hurt Iraq's Fight Against ISIS

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 6:37 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Ed
4:10 am
Thu March 12, 2015

A Child Of Slavery Who Taught A Generation

Anna Julia Cooper was the fourth African-American woman in the U.S. to earn a doctoral degree.
Scurlock Studios Smithsonian

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 12:15 pm

Some great teachers change the life of a student, maybe several. Anna Julia Cooper changed America.

Cooper was one of the first black women in the country to earn a Ph.D. Before that, she headed the first public high school for black students in the District of Columbia — Washington Colored High School. It later became known as the M Street School and was eventually renamed for poet Paul Laurence Dunbar.

Dunbar was a citadel of learning in segregated Washington, a center for rigorous study and no-holds-barred achievement. Its graduates over the years include:

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Middle East
3:38 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Drawn-Out Syrian Civil War Spawns A Literal Dark Age

Girls carrying school bags provided by UNICEF walk past destroyed buildings on their way home from school on March 7 in the rebel-held al-Shaar neighborhood of Aleppo, Syria. So many people have fled the city and so much of its infrastructure has been destroyed that nighttime satellite images show 97 percent less light there compared with four years ago.
Zein al-Rifai AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 10:26 am

The conflict in Syria is entering its fifth year, and two new reports suggest it just keeps getting worse for civilians there.

One United Nations agency says life expectancy has plummeted by 20 years in the once-developed nation, while another new study based on nighttime satellite imagery finds that, in the past four years, 83 percent of the country's lights have gone off.

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U.S.
3:28 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Plans To Explore For Oil Offshore Worry East Coast Residents

Mayor Billy Keyserling of Beaufort, S.C., speaks out against drilling for oil offshore, Jan. 14. He says local votes expressing opposition to oil drilling plans are important even if they don't hold the force of law.
Bruce Smith AP

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 6:37 am

As the Obama administration opens the door to offshore drilling, the oil industry is promising more jobs and less reliance on foreign oil. Some people who live along the Eastern Seaboard are saying, "no thanks."

Coastal towns and cities in several states are formally opposing offshore drilling and oil exploration.

Tybee Island, Ga., is a short drive across the marsh from the historic city of Savannah. The island is dotted with hotels and tiny vacation cottages for tourists — and for about 3,000 people, it's home.

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Shots - Health News
3:27 am
Thu March 12, 2015

When Life Overwhelms, This Group Lends A Healthy Hand

Ella Barnes-Williams visits the thrift shop associated with Martha's Table, a nonprofit social services organization in Washington, D.C.
Anders Kelto/NPR

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 1:03 pm

Ella Barnes-Williams is dealing with a lot right now.

For starters, her government-subsidized house in Northeast Washington, D.C., leaks when it rains. She points at a big brown splotch on the ceiling.

"It's like mold, mold, mold all over," she says. "I've got to clean that now 'cause that just came back."

Barnes-Williams is 54 and lives with her 30-year-old daughter and three young grandchildren. All three grandkids have severe asthma, which makes the mold a serious problem. And she and her daughter are diabetic.

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The Two-Way
3:24 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Researchers Think There's A Warm Ocean On Enceladus

A new analysis suggests that Enceladus' ocean is being heated from the bottom up. That could explain plumes of ice seen at its south pole.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 10:01 am

Saturn's moon Enceladus is a mystery. From Earth it looks tiny and cold, and yet it's not a dead hunk of rock. Passing spacecraft see trenches and ridges, similar to Earth's, and in 2005 NASA's Cassini mission spotted ice geysers streaming from its south pole.

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The Two-Way
2:30 am
Thu March 12, 2015

2 Police Officers Shot Amid Protest At Ferguson Police Department

Police in riot gear respond to demonstrators blocking traffic during a protest Wednesday outside the Ferguson Police Department in Missouri. As the protests were ending, someone fired at the police and wounded two officers.
Michael B. Thomas Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 1:02 pm

St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar said two police officers were shot and seriously wounded shortly after midnight outside the Ferguson, Mo., police department. The shooting occurred as a protest outside the police station had begun to wind down.

A St. Louis County police officer and an officer from nearby Webster Groves, Mo., were shot, according to Belmar. He did not identify them by name.

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Around the Nation
9:42 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Police Chief Is Latest Ferguson, Mo., Official To Resign

An assistant chief will replace Tom Jackson; a Justice Department probe following the shooting death of Michael Brown had found serious problems in how the department operated.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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The Two-Way
6:50 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Filmmaker Richard Glatzer, Who Wrote And Directed 'Still Alice,' Dies At 63

Still Alice directors Richard Glatzer (left) and Wash Westmoreland. Glatzer has died at age 63 after battling ALS.
Ina Jaffe NPR

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 7:20 pm

Filmmaker Richard Glatzer, the co-writer and co-director of Still Alice, died Tuesday in Los Angeles after a battle with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 63.

On the night actress Julianne Moore won an Oscar for her work in the film about a woman with Alzheimer's, Glatzer watched from his hospital room.

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Code Switch
6:28 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Racial Tension Draws Parallels, But Madison Is No Ferguson

Madison Mayor Paul Soglin addresses a crowd of protesters on Martin Luther King Boulevard in Madison, Wis., during a protest of the shooting death of Tony Robinson.
Andy Manis AP

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 10:03 pm

Five days after a white police officer shot and killed 19-year-old Tony Robinson, an unarmed black man, in Madison, Wis., protesters are staging large rallies to demand that charges be filed. Meanwhile, officers are rallying at the Wisconsin State Capitol on behalf of the city's police.

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The Two-Way
5:41 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Report: Secret Service Agents Drove Car Into White House Barricades After Drinking

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 12:33 pm

Updated at 8:44 p.m. ET

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The Salt
4:50 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Why Some Schools Serve Local Food And Others Can't (Or Won't)

A lunch served by the Yarmouth, Maine, School Department on Sept. 26, 2014, featured Sloppy Joe's made with Maine beef and local beets, carrots, apples and potato salad. More than 80 percent of Maine schools said they served local foods in a survey conducted by the USDA.
U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 3:23 pm

For many years, if a public school district wanted to serve students apples or milk from local farmers, it could face all kinds of hurdles. Schools were locked into strict contracts with distributors, few of whom saw any reason to start bringing in local products. Those contracts also often precluded schools from working directly with local farmers.

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Shots - Health News
4:46 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Results Of Many Clinical Trials Not Being Reported

Glenn Lightner in 2012 at age 13. His father searched clinicaltrials.gov for years, to no avail, hoping to find a promising experimental cancer treatment that might save his son's life.
Courtesy of Lawrence Lightner

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 12:01 pm

Many scientists are failing to live up to a 2007 law that requires them to report the results of their clinical trials to a public website, according to a study in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine.

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Shots - Health News
4:34 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Would A Pill To Protect Teens From HIV Make Them Feel Invincible?

Truvada can dramatically reduce the risk of HIV infection when taken as a preventative medicine — if taken every day. Studies are underway to determine if young people are likely to take the pill consistently.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 10:08 am

Leon Richardson is 18 years old and tall, charismatic and thoughtful about his sexual health.

He understands that as a young, gay black man, he is in the demographic with the highest rate of HIV infections in the country. But when Richardson learned that he could be part of an HIV prevention pill research study for young people, he was skeptical.

"I was scared. I had to really think about it, 'What is this drug going to do to me?' " he says.

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Inside NPR.org
3:55 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Ferguson, Mo., Police Chief Resigns Following Justice Department Report

Ferguson, Mo., Police Chief Thomas Jackson is resigning after a scathing Justice Department report showed racial bias in the department and the city's courts.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 6:31 pm

Updated at 6:57 p.m. ET

Ferguson, Mo., Police Chief Thomas Jackson will step down in the wake of a scathing Justice Department report that accused the city's police and court system of racial bias, Mayor James Knowles said at a news conference Wednesday.

Knowles called Chief Thomas Jackson's departure "a mutual separation, which involves the police chief's resignation from the city of Ferguson."

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Around the Nation
3:54 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Investigation Continues Into Crash Of Blackhawk Military Helicopter In Fla.

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 9:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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